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Hye1
11-11-2008, 21:00
Hi Folks:

I am the proprietor and distiller at Garrison Brothers Distillery in Hye, Texas. We've been making fine bourbon, legally, since January 2008.

Since we will not have anything to sell for many years, this is not an ad. But I did want to extend an invitation to bourbon drinking Texans, or anyone else who might get down our way, to come by for a visit. We'll probably put you to work but I'd be proud to show you around.

(Please accept my apologies if this introduction is not appropriate on this forum. I have never entered one of these before; had to get my son to show me how. Please also accept apologies if I don't reply often. We have poor Internet service in Hye.)

Kind regards!

fishnbowljoe
11-11-2008, 21:08
Welcome Hye. Look forward to your comments. Good luck with your bourbon. Keep us posted as to how it's going. Joe

NeoTexan
11-12-2008, 03:27
Welcome and enjoy.

(MMMM Stonewall peaches!!)

ACDetroit
11-12-2008, 06:20
Welcome aboard Hye1, give us some history, I would love to hear what got you started in Distilling? What are you drinking or favorite Bourbons? and Maybe the type of mash bill you are using at your distillery...yes I am sure it's at least 51% corn but are you making a rye, or wheated recipe?

Hope you enjoy your stay and I look forward to your participation.

Tony

wadewood
11-12-2008, 06:21
http://www.garrisonbros.com (http://www.garrisonbros.com/)

Here is the website. Please tell us about your still.

I'm in Houston but I will get over and stop by sometime.

ACDetroit
11-12-2008, 06:29
Thanks Wade, that answered one of my questions.


Tony

Hye1
11-13-2008, 14:59
We are currently making a wheated recipe. We use #1 organic food grade grains and try to source as much as we can from Texas. We're going to fill our 100th barrel next week, so we sent out a press release annnouncing it. I'm going to see if I can attach it. It should answer many questions.

Kind regards,

ACDetroit
11-13-2008, 17:39
Very cool Dan and we look forward to the progress of your wonderful distillate! Can you share with us what you white dog proof is entering the barrel? Seems back in the day low entry proof was the key to good flavor, now they just have to wait extra years to get the same result.

Thanks,
Tony

Damon
11-18-2008, 16:41
Hey Dan. I'm brand new here and really more of a wine guy. I am in the middle of visiting Texas wineries on a project right now. I'd like to stop by and see you on my travels.

fussychicken
12-03-2008, 20:05
This sounds like it might could be interesting...

Its organic
Mostly locally sourced grains
#1 Grains instead of #2
Filtered Rainwater?!? (Maybe a little hokey?)
Good for him for waiting the 4 years needed to call it bourbon.This stuff probably won't be cheap though!!

bvscfanatic
12-03-2008, 22:02
Hi Folks:

I am the proprietor and distiller at Garrison Brothers Distillery in Hye, Texas. We've been making fine bourbon, legally, since January 2008.

Since we will not have anything to sell for many years, this is not an ad. But I did want to extend an invitation to bourbon drinking Texans, or anyone else who might get down our way, to come by for a visit. We'll probably put you to work but I'd be proud to show you around.


It's exciting, actually, to hear about a brand new bourbon that is just now in the very first stages of production. You have alot with which to compete, and ALOT of it is made within an hour or so drive of where I live. I guess all we can do is wait until that stuff of yours is ready. Welcome aboard!!!

HighTower
12-05-2008, 03:40
Welcome Dan,

I just read the article, it's pretty exciting to see someone get into something like this, I wish you the best of luck!

We will need some of this Texas Bourbon in Australia....:grin:

Scott

Hye1
12-08-2008, 12:30
We filled Barrel 100 Thursday night and then my crack team of taste testers and I had a little party..., I mean ... quality control analysis meeting. It'll be a while, and yes -- it'll be expensive, but I think ya'll will enjoy it as much as I do once I can share it with you.

Anyone headed down our way is welcome to come by and see the place. You can sign up on our website for the newsletter if you'd like occasional updates.

Thesh
12-08-2008, 23:04
All I can say is, you can never have too many distilleries... That is, until there are too many to try in a lifetime... And then again, that would just be a challenge.

mozilla
01-08-2009, 18:06
Some of the boys and I are planning a trip out to Marble Falls to check out the new distillery. If anyone is interested in making the drive out there...send me a pm. We will go in the next week or two.

Blitz
01-08-2009, 20:18
Welcome to the board. You have an fascinating story.

I have a question. I recently toured some of the Kentucky distilleries and learned the importance of seasonal temperature changes in order to move the bourbon in and out of the wood for aging. Is the lack of cold weather a problem for you?

Forgive me if this is a stupid question. I'm just getting started in the world of Bourbon.

Good luck!!

mozilla
01-08-2009, 21:54
The hill country has a wide range of temperatures that fluctuate sometimes 50 degrees in a day. So, there should be no problem with proper aging. I would think that the bourbon should age a little faster here.

mozilla
01-12-2009, 17:58
It looks like the trip to the distillery is still on. Just ironing out a few scheduling details.

Thing are bustling out at the Garrison place. Hope to send a report soon.

Hye1
01-13-2009, 08:04
Mozilla is correct. Maturation pretty much ceases when the temp drops delow about 50 degrees anyway. The temp changes here are dramatic, daily. It was 20 degrees in our barrel barn when I woke up this morning and it will be 80 in there this afternoon. As a result, we're getting what looks and tastes like a 3-year old in just 6 months. The Angel's Share eats us alive in August though.

mozilla
01-13-2009, 08:13
Dan,
Is there a way to air condition the warehouses...similar to the heating that is needed in Ky durring the winter? Maybe, there is a way to decrease the evaporation loss. Do you have to tighten up the barrel hoops durring the winter? I have always wanted to know a little more about coopering in the warehouses.

barturtle
01-13-2009, 08:34
It'd be a bit unconventional, but a good architect should be able to design you a warehouse that takes advantage of natural airflow and such to help keep it from getting quite so hot during the summer. An air-conditioning system would be quite expensive and wasteful to run.

mozilla
01-13-2009, 08:53
Wasteful could be the amount of whisky that evaporates.

And I think your opinion might change when your on the top floor of the warehouse on a day that is 104 degrees. I used to deliver furniture in the summers and when it was 100 outside it was about 150 in the back of the boxtruck. You could only stay in the back and pull furniture for a few minutes before having to escape for some fresh air. It would seriously melt you in there.

I do agree that there is probably a way to efficiantly airflow the warehouse.

Hye1
01-13-2009, 17:20
We've already designed a barrel barn prototype that will solve the existing problems. We hope to start construction on the prototype this spring but this is an expensive endeavor.

mozilla
01-20-2009, 19:15
The trip to the distillery is shaping up to be this Friday around noon. I will be getting in touch with Dan tomorrow and schedule things out. If anyone is interested in going...give a shout and we'll get you set up. Randy, Wade and I are on the list as of now. There are a few that have not confirmed at this point.
Looking forward to it.

mozilla
01-26-2009, 07:03
Well, we had a great visit out to Hye on Friday. I will post some pics, soon.

wadewood
01-26-2009, 10:08
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11633

here is the thread with trip details and pictures