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Blitz
12-31-2008, 13:17
First a little background....
I was a long time Jim Beam white drinker. On the rocks. Didn't even know there were premium Bourbons out there. Tried JB Black and thought it tasted funny. I was just so used to the white label. Then went to kentucky with my 22 yr old son and visited some of the distilleries. I got absolutely hooked on the history and craft of Bourbon. Got hooked on fine Bourbon also. Now I want to learn everything there is to learn and taste every Bourbon. It's my new passion.

Here's my question:
A friend left a half bottle of really cheap Scotch at my house. Can I mix this with Bourbon or something else to make it drinkable?

I appreciate any suggestions and I am looking forward to being part of this great community.

kickert
12-31-2008, 13:53
There is a place for scotch and there is a place for bourbon, but I am not convinced there is a place for both of them in the same glass. I like the sweet smoothness of bourbon and the smokey character of scotch; but together I can't imagine they would complement each other.

fishnbowljoe
12-31-2008, 13:54
Welcome to the site Blitz. I'm pretty close to you. I'm from Rockford. I personally wouldn't mix bourbon with the scotch. Save it for when you have company you don't want to serve the good stuff.:slappin: You can mix different bourbons (vatting) and get good results, but I don't think a bourbon-scotch mix would be any good. I'm sure others will post their opinions. Good luck on your bourbon journey. You came to the right place. Joe

smokinjoe
12-31-2008, 14:12
Welcome Blitz. If you've developed a passion for everything bourbon, then you've come to the right place. You're with "family" now. :)

The bourbon/scotch thing is all a matter of how you look at it. If you want to ruin any perfectly good bourbon...add scotch to it. If there's any chance of salvaging scotch...adding bourbon can only help. :D

Special Reserve
12-31-2008, 16:10
Blitz,

First, welcome to the board. Second, there are those on this board who don't even want to mix bourbon with water. Be careful, as that condition is contagious. Third, I'd keep the Scotch tightly sealed it will keep and offer it to scotch drinking visitors or drink it occasionally to reinvigorate your love of bourbon.

Here is a You Tube video done by one of the members that you may enjoy.

How to enjoy your whiskey.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frKWrWcAmMQ&feature=related

Will

Dramiel McHinson
12-31-2008, 18:04
Blitz,

Welcome! Your's is a great story on finding a passion for bourbon. It's a huge bourbon world out there. There are slums and seedy dwellings that give way to a vast area of middle class that stretches over the horizon. Through the maze of middle class is the oasis of ultra premium whisk(e)y. Beware for here be dragons that tear one's wallet to shreds with exquisite taste and beguiling smells. Every citizen you meet along the way will give you true and good advice but in the end it is always your personal taste and experience that matters most to you.

I personally have never thought of mixing bourbon and scotch. Do it once to settle your own mind. my suggestion would be to add only an ounce of one to an ounce of the other and give it a try. If you don't like it, don't waste your time with further experiments mixing the two.

Cheap scotch may not necessarily be bad scotch as price is no indication of taste. If you have tried it neat or with water and you don't care for it then you might mix it. Blended scotches mix well with certain things but not always with the same mixers as bourbon. So...my suggestion would be to visit the brand's website and look for recipes for mix drinks or other inventive ways to enjoy the bottle. If all else fails then visit the friend who left the bottle and gift it back to him with a simple explanation that he forgot it and it seemed to suffer some evaporation while in your possession.

Please enjoy your stay

chefmel
12-31-2008, 19:20
Here's my question:
A friend left a half bottle of really cheap Scotch at my house. Can I mix this with Bourbon or something else to make it drinkable?

I appreciate any suggestions and I am looking forward to being part of this great community.

Welcome aboard Blitz,

In my humble opinion, there's nothing you can mix with most any scotch that will make it drinkable!:slappin:

Enjoy the all the knowlege you'll find on this site!

Mark

funknik
12-31-2008, 23:14
Welcome aboard Blitz,

In my humble opinion, there's nothing you can mix with most any scotch that will make it drinkable!:slappin:

Enjoy the all the knowlege you'll find on this site!

MarkI'm not much of a scotch fan, either...I did love the McCallan 12 so I have high hopes for the single malts in the future, but in my opinion, bourbon is bourbon and everything else is....not bourbon. Never mix, never worry.

shoshani
01-01-2009, 07:19
I wouldn't do it. The bourbon would most likely overpower the Scotch. There are higher-end blended Scotches that cost at least as much as, if not more than, single malts, and they have great depth and complexity....but cheaper blended Scotch is basically a mixer designed to keep a low profile. Bourbon would throw it in the bed of a pickup truck and drive it at high speed through the hills until it was dizzy. :D


One thing to keep in mind is that blended scotch is a mixture of malt whisky, made from 100% malted barley, and grain whisky, which is whisky distilled primarily from corn, wheat, or a mixture of the two and then matured in barrels for a few years before being used. This means that the grain whiskey element, which makes up the majority of the blend, is actually not that far away from being a lighter-flavored "bourbon style" spirit. (No Scotch whisky, malt or grain, uses new charred barrels as bourbon and rye do. That's one of many reasons why bourbon and rye has more flavor at a younger age and takes half the time to fully mature...)

Blitz
01-01-2009, 11:18
Thanks for all the replies. I am really going to enjoy it here. I figured there was a reason I had never really heard of this type of mixing, and most of the replies confirmed it. The following quote probably summed it up the best:


If you want to ruin any perfectly good bourbon...add scotch to it. :D

Don't want to do that!

Here's what I have tried so far ....
Buffalo Trace
Knob Creek
Woodford Reserve
Evan Williams Single Barrel 1998
Makers Mark

I think I am working mostly in the 'wheated' catagory here. Can someone make a recommendation for a first 'Rye' to give a try?

Blitz
01-01-2009, 11:22
Blitz,

Here is a You Tube video done by one of the members that you may enjoy.

How to enjoy your whiskey.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frKWrWcAmMQ&feature=related

Will

Thanks for the link. I think I will sit in front of a Bowl game and watch the videos during commercials. :cool: Talk about a perfect day!

chilidawg7
01-01-2009, 11:44
Thanks for all the replies. I am really going to enjoy it here. I figured there was a reason I had never really heard of this type of mixing, and most of the replies confirmed it. The following quote probably summed it up the best:



Don't want to do that!

Here's what I have tried so far ....
Buffalo Trace
Knob Creek
Woodford Reserve
Evan Williams Single Barrel 1998
Makers Mark

I think I am working mostly in the 'wheated' catagory here. Can someone make a recommendation for a first 'Rye' to give a try?

One of my personal favorite rye choices (and a popular choice among many here) is Old Grand Dad 114. It is also pretty fairly priced. Here in FL, I can find it for about $24.99 most of the time.

kickert
01-01-2009, 17:28
Here's what I have tried so far ....
Buffalo Trace
Knob Creek
Woodford Reserve
Evan Williams Single Barrel 1998
Makers Mark

I think I am working mostly in the 'wheated' catagory here. Can someone make a recommendation for a first 'Rye' to give a try?

Actually Maker's Mark is the only wheater you have on the list. You have actually done a very good job of balancing your list. It looks like you need to try a Four Roses (I like the small batch, but others swear by the single barrel). If you want a rye, and try another distillery, I would go with something from Wild Turkey.

fishnbowljoe
01-01-2009, 18:18
Actually Maker's Mark is the only wheater you have on the list. You have actually done a very good job of balancing your list. It looks like you need to try a Four Roses (I like the small batch, but others swear by the single barrel). If you want a rye, and try another distillery, I would go with something from Wild Turkey.Yeah, What he said.:lol: Although I'm one of those that prefer the FR Single Barrel. Joe

Blitz
01-01-2009, 21:18
Actually Maker's Mark is the only wheater you have on the list. You have actually done a very good job of balancing your list. It looks like you need to try a Four Roses (I like the small batch, but others swear by the single barrel). If you want a rye, and try another distillery, I would go with something from Wild Turkey.

My original question question was if the Bourbons I have tried so far are too similar in taste, or do I just need to develop my tasting skills. I guess Kickert gave me the answer. I need more practice! Lucky me.

OscarV
01-01-2009, 21:23
yeah Blitz, the info provided here is good, but the best way is to drink 'em all and learn for yourself.

kickert
01-02-2009, 07:45
My original question question was if the Bourbons I have tried so far are too similar in taste, or do I just need to develop my tasting skills. I guess Kickert gave me the answer. I need more practice! Lucky me.

I might actually recommend you try a rye whisky. In my humble opinion, Rittenhouse BIB is the best moderatly priced rye. WT101 is also tasty. I have not had Old Overholt or Beamr Rye. While these are not bourbons, they will give you a good feel for what rye tastes like in a bourbon. If you compare Makers to Rittenhouse will see a definite difference. Then you may be able to pull out the rye flavors in something like Knob Creek.

When I first started tasting bourbon I had a very hard time distinguishing differences. I actually did a 5 way taste test and only 2 of them seemed evenly slightly different. I have found the easiest taste profile to first pick up is the movement from sweetness (high corn like Old Charter and High Wheat like Makers Mark) to spiciness/pepperiness (High rye like Wild Turkey). Of those you listed the movement from sweetest to spiciest will usually look like this: MM, BT, EW, WR, KC

Keep it up... it took me about 6 months of trying different bourbons and reading this board to be able to even describe what I was tasting.

sotnsipper
01-02-2009, 10:55
If you want a good rye'd bourbon, I would go with the suggested WT101, OGD114, and another good one is Old Forester Signature. The OF Sig is a little cheaper and I really prefer it over the WT101. If you want a straight rye I would also suggest the Old Rittenhouse, very good stuff. I have been going back and forth between the wheatiers and the rye's. On the wheatier side I highly suggest Weller Antique 107 and for the Rye, go with the Signature. If you do not like them, I will gladly take them off your hands:slappin:. Oh yeah, one more I about forgot bout on the rye side is Fighting Cock. It has a little more bite but still good. I would also suggest start out drinking with a few cubes of ice and work your way to trying to drink it neat, or with a splash of water. May take a while to work up to drinking neat, but you cant beat it on really experiencing the true flavor of the bourbon. Enjoy!

kickert
01-02-2009, 12:04
I would also suggest start out drinking with a few cubes of ice and work your way to trying to drink it neat, or with a splash of water. May take a while to work up to drinking neat, but you cant beat it on really experiencing the true flavor of the bourbon. Enjoy!

This is great advise. The goal is not necessarily to get to the point where you can drink it neat. Rather, the more you drink it, the more you realize the advantages of drinking bourbon neat. I started with it on the rocks and moved to using a splash of water and now I almost always drink it neat.

Blitz
01-02-2009, 18:12
I might actually recommend you try a rye whisky. In my humble opinion, Rittenhouse BIB is the best moderatly priced rye. WT101 is also tasty......

When I first started tasting bourbon I had a very hard time distinguishing differences. I actually did a 5 way taste test and only 2 of them seemed evenly slightly different......Keep it up... it took me about 6 months of trying different bourbons and reading this board to be able to even describe what I was tasting.

Kickert, this post is very, very encouraging. Thanks.


..... Oh yeah, one more I about forgot bout on the rye side is Fighting Cock. It has a little more bite but still good. I would also suggest start out drinking with a few cubes of ice and work your way to trying to drink it neat, or with a splash of water. May take a while to work up to drinking neat, but you cant beat it on really experiencing the true flavor of the bourbon. Enjoy!

This suggestion and others have been very helpful. I have already put it to use. I found a 50ml bottle of WT101 and tasted it with MM. I went with MM first, and it was familiar, but knowing that it was 'wheaty' before I tried it will will help me to associated the wheat charactor in future tastings. Then I tried the Wild Turkey. After tasting the MM, I could immediately tell the difference. Then a crazy thing happened. I had a flashback of my grandfather. The taste of the 'rye' reminded me of him. He lived with us when I was a teenager and he was an old time whiskey drinker, and gave me a little bit every once in a while. I don't remember what he drank specifically, but it was rye, I have no doubt. This was really fun. Thanks for the encouragement.

polyamnesia
01-02-2009, 18:19
hmmm....just take that scotch, pour it in the back yard as an offering to the Spirits....

go and get a bottle of something ELSE. a decent single barrel bourbon might be a way to spoil ya....

ROTYDE
01-06-2009, 12:27
Why mess up a good bourbon?:rolleyes:

Blitz
01-11-2009, 13:01
I might actually recommend you try a rye whisky. In my humble opinion, Rittenhouse BIB is the best moderatly priced rye. WT101 is also tasty. I have not had Old Overholt or Beamr Rye. While these are not bourbons, they will give you a good feel for what rye tastes like in a bourbon. If you compare Makers to Rittenhouse will see a definite difference. Then you may be able to pull out the rye flavors in something like Knob Creek.

Kickert, I took your advice and picked up a bottle of Rittenhouse. You were right, once you taste full rye, it is easier to pick it out in Bourbon. I spent the evening comparing the rye to the wheated Makers Mark and then looking for the Rye in Knob Creek. This is an excellent exercise in building fundamental whiskey tasting skills, and I recommend it to other newbies. Thanks again.

kickert
01-11-2009, 13:08
Kickert, I took your advice and picked up a bottle of Rittenshouse. You were right, once you taste full rye, it is easier to pick it out in Bourbon. I spent the evening comparing the rye to the wheated Makers Mark and then looking for the Rye in Knob Creek. This is an excellent exercise in building fundamental whiskey tastings skills, and I recommend it to other newbies. Thanks again.

I am glad it worked for you. I still have so much more to learn, but once I got rye down, it helped identify other mashbills. I have found high corn mashbills and wheaters both tend to be sweet (as opposed to spicy). High corn is usually oilier and (at least to me) a bit more syruppy (i.e. the sweetness lingers). Wheaters tend to be sweet, but more straightforward. But then again when you get the older wheaters they pick up a lot of vanilla / carmel from the oak and that can be confusing.

Keep it up... it is a pursuit that is fun even when we fail :-)

Rughi
01-11-2009, 13:33
I have found high corn mashbills and wheaters both tend to be sweet (as opposed to spicy). High corn is usually oilier and (at least to me) a bit more syruppy (i.e. the sweetness lingers). Wheaters tend to be sweet, but more straightforward. But then again when you get the older wheaters they pick up a lot of vanilla / carmel from the oak and that can be confusing.

I think you've got those thoughts nailed better than many long time enthusiasts. Trust your tastebuds, they're proving very good so far.

Roger