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View Full Version : Ten High is now a blend, at least in New York.



cowdery
02-01-2009, 23:18
Be on the look out for Ten High labeled not as "Kentucky Straight Sour Mash Bourbon Whiskey," but as "Bourbon Whiskey - a Blend."

My friend in upstate New York, who discovered this outrage after he got the bottle home, was told by his whiskey monger that the straight has been discontinued.

My friend wondered if this was some depredation by the brand's new owner, but I assured him it can't be Sazerac's fault, as that deal won't even close for another month or so.

The Constellation Spirits web site still shows the only available expression of Ten High as being the 80-proof straight bourbon we all know and love...well, know, anyway.

Ten High was once a big brand, made by Hiram Walker in Peoria, Illinois. It passed first to Heaven Hill, then to Barton. The name refers to aging in the upper part of the warehouse, at the tenth rick high or above.

sotnsipper
02-02-2009, 07:06
Be on the look out for Ten High labeled not as "Kentucky Straight Sour Mash Bourbon Whiskey," but as "Bourbon Whiskey - a Blend."

The Constellation Spirits web site still shows the only available expression of Ten High as being the 80-proof straight bourbon we all know and love...well, know, anyway.

Ten High was once a big brand, made by Hiram Walker in Peoria, Illinois. It passed first to Heaven Hill, then to Barton. The name refers to aging in the upper part of the warehouse, at the tenth rick high or above.

I actually looked at a bottle of this the other day because it was stuck over on the "Canadian Whiskey" shelf. I can remember drinking this a while back, well a few years back, and remember it being the straight whiskey. I guess the store just ran out of room on the shelf because it is still labeled this way here in TN. It is funny that you make this post after I actually picked up(not to buy)this bottle just the other day. I will keep my eye on it to see if the label changes any time soon. Don't think it is a fast mover here so may take a while to rotate stock.

P.S. That is interesting info on the name, I never knew that. Thanks.

mozilla
02-02-2009, 07:13
Chuck, when was TH a HH product? I have a TH10 from Barton in 1990 and thought that Hiram Walker was still around at that time.

cowdery
02-02-2009, 14:27
I believe Hiram Walker retained the brand for some time after it closed the plant in Peoria, but contracted with Heaven Hill to produce it. They closed Peoria in 73, so they probably contracted with Heaven Hill in the late 70s, when they started to run out of the Peoria whiskey. I'm not sure when Walker sold the brand, but I think it was always just a contract job at HH, then HW moved the contract to Barton, which eventually bought the brand, and then only a few more years after that, took the Hiram Walker name off the label. They also added their own (i.e., Tom Moore's) founding date of 1879.

ILLfarmboy
02-02-2009, 14:33
Be on the look out for Ten High labeled not as "Kentucky Straight Sour Mash Bourbon Whiskey," but as "Bourbon Whiskey - a Blend."

My friend in upstate New York, who discovered this outrage after he got the bottle home, was told by his whiskey monger that the straight has been discontinued.



This sucks.

What sucks is that they can keep the "bourbon" part. I didn't think they could get away with that. I thought that's why Early Times started calling itself a "Kentucky whiskey" when some of the juice in the bottle was replaced with distillate aged in used cooperage.

This Ten High "Bourbon Whiskey - a Blend", does it contain GNS? Surely they can't go that far and still use "bourbon" as part of the name. Right?

kickert
02-02-2009, 14:35
Good Questions Brad.

mozilla
02-02-2009, 14:48
From what I understand....if they are making the whisky from bourbon and gns...it can be called bourbon blend.

If they are using used cooperage with new distillate...then they can't call it bourbon. And thus, it is just called whisky.

Now, if BF wanted to...they could call their product a bourbon blend, because they use bourbon in the blend. I think they liked the term whisky to blend? Also, I don't think ET has any gns in it?

Sound right, Chuck?

craigthom
02-02-2009, 17:56
I believe Hiram Walker retained the brand for some time after it closed the plant in Peoria, but contracted with Heaven Hill to produce it. They closed Peoria in 73, so they probably contracted with Heaven Hill in the late 70s, when they started to run out of the Peoria whiskey. I'm not sure when Walker sold the brand, but I think it was always just a contract job at HH, then HW moved the contract to Barton, which eventually bought the brand, and then only a few more years after that, took the Hiram Walker name off the label. They also added their own (i.e., Tom Moore's) founding date of 1879.

OK, now I'm confused. I've got a bottle of Ten High that says "Distilled by Hiram Walker & Sons, Inc., Peoria, Illinois", but it's a 750ml bottle, which would make it '76 or '77, wouldn't it? So it wasn't actually distilled in Peoria?

Maybe they quit distilling in 1973 but kept bottling what was in the warehouses?

I only bought this thing to have mainstream bourbon not distilled in Kentucky.

cowdery
02-02-2009, 19:02
Maybe they quit distilling in 1973 but kept bottling what was in the warehouses?

That is exactly what they did. The distillery closed altogether in 1981. I'm not sure when ADM acquired it and started to make ethanol there.

"Bourbon - a Blend," aka "Blended Bourbon Whiskey" is a recognized category in the federal standards. While a "blended whiskey" must contain 20% straight whiskey on a proof gallon basis, a "Bourbon blend" must contain at least 51% straight bourbon, also on a proof gallon basis. "Proof gallon basis" means it must be at least 51% full proof (i.e., 100 proof) straight whiskey, so if it's then diluted down to 80 proof, the ratio of whiskey to GNS is even more in the whiskey's favor. You can also have blended rye whiskey, same deal.

Although it's not required by the law, most producers use grain spirits that are not, technically, neutral because they have spent a few months in used barrels.

The term "blend" is reserved for those products that combine straight whiskey with an un-aged spirit, either a neutral spirit or un-aged whiskey, or these grain spirits. Early Times really isn't that. Early Times combines straight whiskey with something called "Whiskey distilled from bourbon mash.'' That is a bourbon mash whiskey that has been aged in used, not new, cooperage. Not wanting to get bogged down in all that terminology, Brown-Forman just coined the term "Kentucky Whiskey," which has no legal meaning beyond the legal meaning of "whiskey" and the fact that place-of-origin names have to be truthful. After all, they had pretty good success with "Tennessee Whiskey."

Buffalo Bill
02-03-2009, 17:14
Rectified Booze made to look AUTHENTIC.

HELLO?!?

BB

cowdery
02-03-2009, 19:34
Since the original message, my correspondent has tasted the stuff. He writes:


I am sorry to have to tell you that the taste is just awful. It gets that (as best as I can describe it ) that high in the nose taste, that a cheap blend has. That is from the gns. I will just have to switch brands. Drink a little too much of that, and you will smell it all day tomorrow. Reminds me of blended Bourbon Supreme.  Luckily, Ancient Age, is available.

Please be on the look-out for this stuff. I'm curious to know how widely it's distributed.

polyamnesia
02-03-2009, 19:38
well, around here, it's still the real thing....not that i've cared to try, but in the name of an homage-to-the-disappearing-past, is it worth trying the final run of the non-blended version?

cowdery
02-03-2009, 19:44
One good thing about control states such as Pennsylvania is that the producer can't just make the switch. Since they're actually changing the product, they have to de-list the original and apply for listing of the new version, which costs money and runs the risk that the new product won't get listed, so one can often find in control states products that aren't sold anywhere else, because the maker is loath to give up the listing.

I have a half-full bottle of the real stuff, and will buy another at my next opportunity. It's not bad, and it is cheap, and I too would like to have a full one against its future disappearance.

Even though Sazerac has done a good job in the cats and dogs business, I thought they were moving away from that. If they really are, then I expect they will do some serious pruning, either by selling brands to someone like Luxco, or just discontinuing them.

Or maybe not. The thing about cats and dogs is you don't spend any money marketing them, so all you need is enough business to justify the incremental cost of making and distributing them. As long as the distributor keeps ordering it, why stop making it?

The problem is that except at the very bottom of the scale, essentially generics, you can't really substitute. If you discontinue, say, Ten High and say, "here, take Ancient Age instead," some people (both trade customers and consumers) will, but plenty of others will switch to Old Crow or JTS Brown, something else on the bottom shelf that's not made by BT.

whskylvr
02-03-2009, 19:57
Hello,

I work for a distributor in California and YES all the Ten High is switching from Straight Bourbon to Bourbon Whiskey a blend. This something Constellation did before the sale to Sazerac. Disappointed we sold Ten High to many bars for their well, now they will have to switch to Old Crow.

Dave

StraightBoston
02-03-2009, 21:39
Just had Ten High KSBW at a bar Friday night in MA. As I explained to my teammates, if I don't see something on the top shelf that tickles my fancy, I'm just as likely to "call" for the "well" drink. I find Ten High to be very drinkable (I'm not sure I can say the same for Old Crow, though I didn't mind the newest version of Old Taylor) but quite light.

ThomasH
02-04-2009, 09:34
I was just at my local liquor store (which really isn't much of one) to get lottery tickets and the Ten High here is still KSB. At 10.65 a 1L, I may have to get a bottle before the blended replacement shows up!

Thomas

unclebunk
02-04-2009, 12:23
I believe Hiram Walker retained the brand for some time after it closed the plant in Peoria, but contracted with Heaven Hill to produce it. They closed Peoria in 73, so they probably contracted with Heaven Hill in the late 70s, when they started to run out of the Peoria whiskey. I'm not sure when Walker sold the brand, but I think it was always just a contract job at HH, then HW moved the contract to Barton, which eventually bought the brand, and then only a few more years after that, took the Hiram Walker name off the label. They also added their own (i.e., Tom Moore's) founding date of 1879.

I just found a Hiram Walker's Ten High Ten (86 proof) in a handsome metal cannister for $15 at a local liquor store. It was distilled by Barton in Bardstown and has a number "90" on the bottom of the bottle, so I'm assuming that it was bottled in 1990. Can't wait to taste it actually--I'll spring for a $15 ten year old any day of the week and give her a try. Nice looking bottle too!

cowdery
02-04-2009, 15:16
Thomas, Ohio is probably safe since they would have to delist the bourbon and relist the blend, which they will be loath to do.

Unclebunk, I'll be interested in your opinion of the Ten High Ten. It wasn't available for very long and was rather too early to the super premium bourbons game, launching just shortly after Beam's Small Batch Collection. Super premium at $15? It was in 1990.

What can we learn from this change? We can conclude that Barton is allocating its stock of fully-aged whiskey to its most profitable distribution channels. It just can't spare enough 4-year-old bourbon to support Ten High as a 4-year-old bourbon.

They could have saved a lot more bourbon by making it a straight-up blend, but this allows them to keep the word "Bourbon" on the label.

I assume that Ten High, in Barton's overall mix, is high volume, low margin. They probably calculate that a price increase will cost them more business than will a cheapening of the product. Those are the kind of calculations you make.

The fact that they have other channels where they can sell that bourbon more profitably means the bourbon market continues to be healthy, which is overall good for us as straight bourbon enthusiasts.

ThomasH
02-04-2009, 18:15
Chuck, if this is the case (and I hope it is), I will probably be on the lookout for a couple of minis of the blended, one for the collection and one to taste!

Thomas

unclebunk
02-05-2009, 12:39
Unclebunk, I'll be interested in your opinion of the Ten High Ten. It wasn't available for very long and was rather too early to the super premium bourbons game, launching just shortly after Beam's Small Batch Collection. Super premium at $15? It was in 1990.
.

Well, I had an opportunity to pour a few fingers of the Ten High Ten last night and was really impressed. Chuck, I think you're on to something with your suggestion that THT might very well have been marketed in its day (1990) along the lines of a "super premium," but didn't exist long enough to gain any traction. Judging by the handsome outer packaging, unique bottle shape (tall, rectangular and stylish symmetrical indentations on each side) and elaborate notes on the rear of the bottle, the THT has all the traits of an ahead-of-its-time super premium and the juice inside the bottle confirms that. In fact, I'll go way out on a limb and suggest that, in a blind taste test, the THT would compete favorably with virtually any bourbon currently on the market in the $20-$30 range.

While I hate to make comparisons of this sort, as each bourbon should be appreciated on its own merits, I would liken THT to Ancient Ancient Age 10 Year Old. They are both 10 year old 86 proofers with a similar flavor/aroma, however THT seems slightly more robust all the way around, with a more burnished copper color in the glass, better legs and a bit more body in the mouth. My brother reached the same conclusion without a word from me, if two feeble-minded opinions count for anything. What a nice surprise for a mere $15. I guess it pays to keep an open mind because cost really has little to do with quality bourbon in the overall scheme of things.

unclebunk
02-05-2009, 14:14
Here are a few pictures, by the way.

cowdery
02-05-2009, 16:51
Word just in: add Massachusetts to the list of states that are getting the new, gag-worthy Ten High.

MissingKY
02-06-2009, 11:46
I was in two liquor stores in Florida today, and both had the blend, not the KSBW.

StraightBoston
02-07-2009, 15:26
I can unfortunately confirm Chuck's report for Massachusetts...

(Can't believe we're bemoaning the loss of Ten High!)

sotnsipper
02-07-2009, 16:59
I can confirm that TN is now getting the blended whiskey. I was in another store today and found the 750 as the straight bourbon whiskey but the liter and the 1.75 are now Kentucky Blended Whiskey. Is it time to grab the Original Straight for safe keeping?? There are only a few bottles left. Grab them or leave them?

kickert
02-07-2009, 17:14
Here in the motherland it is already switched to the blend as well. Saw it tonight at the Kroger's Spirit Shoppe.

spun_cookie
02-07-2009, 19:05
Tucson has both ... the non blends are dusties down here

smokinjoe
02-07-2009, 19:33
I would only say, that if we are still finding WT12's today...then you'll still be able to find Ten High Bourbons well into the 2030's.

Then again, if you really like it, and it's your "go to"...then start hoarding.

spun_cookie
02-07-2009, 19:43
I would only say, that if we are still finding WT12's today...then you'll still be able to find Ten High Bourbons well into the 2030's.

Then again, if you really like it, and it's your "go to"...then start hoarding.

There will be Ten High and Cockroches left in DC after the world is destroyed....

htomczak
02-10-2009, 11:56
Well just picked up 2 1.75's in Pennsylvania and as Chuck said it is still the KSBW. And there was plenty on the shelf. The funny part is I've never had it before but figured I'd give it a shot just in case it does change. Haven't checked the Jersey shelves yet.

funknik
02-10-2009, 12:07
I see only KSBW on the shelves up here in Maine, but this stuff is $9.50 a 750....besides the principle, does it really matter if we lose this one? I've never had it, I might buy one for posterity before it all switches, but then I think....why?

cowdery
02-10-2009, 12:21
The owner of the whiskey has decided that its best and highest use is not as Ten High straight bourbon. That's a shame because it's an old brand and was a good value, so that's a loss. But it's happening because bourbon is so strong right now, which is good. So it's mixed.

funknik
02-10-2009, 12:33
The owner of the whiskey has decided that its best and highest use is not as Ten High straight bourbon. That's a shame because it's an old brand and was a good value, so that's a loss. But it's happening because bourbon is so strong right now, which is good. So it's mixed.
Right! Hopefully the distilleries are distilling the hell out of stuff now so that in 10 years we can either save some of those brands (or re-introduce them at a higher price as is the current trend :hot: ) or have a cavalcade of the stuff and we'll never have to worry about finding good bourbon again.

A fella can dream.....:bis:


Let me take it another way...hopefully there's no chance that someday the state of bourbon quality will be so awful that we will all be gushing about how wonderful those 10 High KSBWs from 2008 are.

cowdery
02-10-2009, 15:43
Good bourbon isn't going away, it's just getting more expensive.

For example, Van Winkle Lot B, $39.99 at Binny's in December, now $44.99.

I blame myself.

But Binny's does still have Ten High KSBW, $8.99/750ml.

jburlowski
02-10-2009, 16:31
The blend is now on the shelves at The Party Source. I had to check carefully to see the difference on the label --- and I was looking for it! The average consumer doesn't have a chance

I asked one of the employees why it was stocked with the straight whiskey and not with the blends. He wasn't aware of the change until I pointed it out.

craigthom
02-15-2009, 06:52
I've got questions about this old bottle of Ten High I found.

It's got a tax strip, or at least I think it does. It's very faded and hard to read, but I think it's a real one.

The bottle is 750ml.

It says "Distilled by Hiram Walker & Sons, Peoria, Illinois".

It claims to be Straight Bourbon Whiskey, not KSBW.

The catch is that the bottle has an 82 on the bottom.

If it was indeed bottled in 1982, I see two possibilities:

1. The whiskey was distilled at Heaven Hill.

2. It's pretty old stock actually distilled in Peoria.

It doesn't claim to be actually distilled IN Peoria, but it doesn't claim to be KSBW, which you'd think they would do as a selling point.

I guess we'll have to open it to find out. Maybe I should bring it to the Sampler if I get a chance to go.

Josh
02-15-2009, 13:53
I've got questions about this old bottle of Ten High I found.

It's got a tax strip, or at least I think it does. It's very faded and hard to read, but I think it's a real one.

The bottle is 750ml.

It says "Distilled by Hiram Walker & Sons, Peoria, Illinois".

It claims to be Straight Bourbon Whiskey, not KSBW.

The catch is that the bottle has an 82 on the bottom.

If it was indeed bottled in 1982, I see two possibilities:

1. The whiskey was distilled at Heaven Hill.

2. It's pretty old stock actually distilled in Peoria.



What about the date makes you think it was distilled by HH? It's currently made at the Tom Moore/Barton distillery in Bardstown. It seems pretty that it was distilled in Peoria given the lack of "Kentucky" on the bottle and the fact that Peoria is listed on the label.

callmeox
02-15-2009, 15:35
IIRC, the juice can be distilled anywhere in the US and be labeled as KSBW as long as it ages at least one year in a warehouse in Kentucky.

craigthom
02-15-2009, 18:22
What about the date makes you think it was distilled by HH? It's currently made at the Tom Moore/Barton distillery in Bardstown. It seems pretty that it was distilled in Peoria given the lack of "Kentucky" on the bottle and the fact that Peoria is listed on the label.

According to what I've read on this site Heaven Hill had the contract for distilling the Hiram Walker stuff after the Peoria distillery closed and before the labels were sold to Barton.

There are bottles of ER101 out there that say "New Orleans" on the label, but the bourbon wasn't distilled there. All sorts of shenanigans go on with company names and cities on labels. I'm not sure if "Distilled by Hiram Walker & Sons, Peoria, Illinois" actually means the distilling happened there.

The label does not say KSBW, but that doesn't mean that it isn't. Maybe they wanted to maintain the illusion that it was still made in Peoria. Or maybe it actually was.

cowdery
02-15-2009, 20:04
My guess would be that as long as Hiram Walker owned the brand, or possibly the brand and the plant, the label stayed the same as it was in Peoria. After Barton took over, they decided "Kentucky" would be a good thing to have on the label.

Remember, people then didn't know how long the bourbon crash would last. Some thought it might turn around quickly and go back to its former levels. Consistent with the above, perhaps Walker closed Peoria but didn't sell it, with the expectation that if bourbon did rebound, they could reopen. Eventually Hiram Walker itself was sold, and parts such as the distillery and the Ten High brand were sold off. Even if bourbon did rebound, Barton wasn't moving Ten High back to Peoria, so it became moot.

Just a theory.

Josh
02-16-2009, 09:40
My guess would be that as long as Hiram Walker owned the brand, or possibly the brand and the plant, the label stayed the same as it was in Peoria. After Barton took over, they decided "Kentucky" would be a good thing to have on the label.

Remember, people then didn't know how long the bourbon crash would last. Some thought it might turn around quickly and go back to its former levels. Consistent with the above, perhaps Walker closed Peoria but didn't sell it, with the expectation that if bourbon did rebound, they could reopen. Eventually Hiram Walker itself was sold, and parts such as the distillery and the Ten High brand were sold off. Even if bourbon did rebound, Barton wasn't moving Ten High back to Peoria, so it became moot.

Just a theory.

Makes a lot of sense.

Jono
02-17-2009, 09:48
The local grocer...Meijer...has plenty of 10 High - unblended - selling for about $10-11. I have never had it...it looked by color fairly light...I still think I will pass on it.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1870&highlight=Ten+High

barturtle
02-25-2009, 20:24
Ten High - Bourbon a blend is on the shelves in KY now

cowdery
02-26-2009, 10:55
Interesting that it's still a bourbon in Illinios. I wonder if Illinois is a partcularly good market for the brand, due to the fact that until 30 years ago it was made here. It's also possible that the Illinois distributor just has a lot of the bourbon so the blend hasn't rolled out yet. I got a bottle for the bunker and maybe if it's still a bourbon the next time I'm in a liquor store, I'll buy another.

JeffRenner
02-26-2009, 16:12
The local grocer...Meijer...has plenty of 10 High - unblended - selling for about $10-11

I picked up a bottle (straight bourbon) at our local Meijer for $7.22, the state minimum. Lots on the shelf.

It's not bad for a mixer or cooking bourbon, but a little rough for drinking straight/on the rocks/with a splash.

Jeff

sotnsipper
02-27-2009, 06:49
I have been keeping an eye on Ten High since this thread was posted. I have watched it all turn to the blend in a few short weeks. All I see now is the blend.

htomczak
02-27-2009, 13:25
I have been keeping an eye on Ten High since this thread was posted. I have watched it all turn to the blend in a few short weeks. All I see now is the blend.

Still the bourbon in PA - NJ and DE all switched to the blend. Had never had this until this thread started. I actually kinda like it! Not premium bourbon for sure but very drinkable - and has a nice kick.

Waiahi
03-02-2009, 15:03
I have been keeping an eye on Ten High since this thread was posted. I have watched it all turn to the blend in a few short weeks. All I see now is the blend.

Same here in Hawaii. Two days ago is the first time I saw the blend at my local grocery store. Funny, I've never even tried TH the KSBW, yet thanks to this forum and Chuck's blog, I find myself looking at the Ten High label every time I go to the liquor/grocery store... :slappin:

cowdery
03-02-2009, 17:24
One interesting point about these reports is it shows how well Ten High is still distributed. It's a shame the brand's owners couldn't build on that and decided to milk it instead.

The next thing to watch for: does the Ten High blend start showing up on close-outs? That will tell us that retailers initially ordered in as much of the blend as they had the bourbon, but consumers stopped buying it. Ditto if it starts to disappear from stores that had been carrying it.

Waiahi
03-03-2009, 19:26
Chuck, do you think you could tell the difference in a blind taste test between TH the blend and TH the Bourbon? Is it drastically different? Do you think a regular TH Bourbon drinker could be fooled if he weren't paying attention to the label?

sotnsipper
03-04-2009, 05:26
I find myself looking at the Ten High label every time I go to the liquor/grocery store...

I know. I did actually run across a place where they actually had NO blend, just the KSBW. I have never tried it but even at ~$8 a bottle, I still did not pick it up. Now I am afraid I will like it, and it is going away.

smokinjoe
03-04-2009, 05:42
I've had Ten High before, but it had been at least a couple of years, so I couldn't honestly remember what it tasted like. So, I took the $9 plunge, and picked up a bottle. Now, I remember why I can't remember it. There simply isn't much there. It's not off-putting. It's not offensive. It's not bad. It's just a plain 'ol, $9, 80 proof ,Ten High. If you're in dire need of a bland $9 bourbon, there will remain forty-eleven bottles for you to choose from when Ten High bourbon is completely gone from the shelves in 2053. OK, they might not be $9 then, but you get my point.
This is not meant to be critical, it's just opinion. That being said, I AM distressed that this bourbon, or any bourbon, gets dumbed-down to a blend.

gblick
03-04-2009, 06:28
There's tons of Ten High everywhere here in Houston, but I've yet to see the new blend. I guess the stores are not going to restock until they run out or get really low.

mozilla
03-04-2009, 07:23
Though I don't buy Ten High as a regular pour...I do buy other Barton products as mixers and sippers.

I find Ten High to be consistent with other 80 proof Barton labels(Barclays, Col. Lee, Tom Moore, Ky. Tavern, Ky Gentleman, Ten High, Walkers Deluxe, Very Old Barton).
For example: Kentucky Tavern goes onsale for $11.25 a 1.75ltr...I use it frequently as a house bourbon. To me...it taste identical to TenHigh and other Barton labels.

cowdery
03-04-2009, 08:52
The guy who tipped me to this originally, whose opinion I value, says it is very different. Ten High has long been his everyday bourbon. He says the new blend is awful, choke-worthy.

I became a Ten High fan years ago, when the whiskey glut was still in force and they were using older and better whiskey in it. As stocks have tightened, it has gone downhill but still tastes like what it is, which is a well-made but barely 4-year-old bourbon. I still like it from time to time. People who don't like it mainly just don't like young bourbons. I don't care for a steady diet of them, but sometimes it's just the thing.

Route 66
04-18-2009, 08:32
This is an interesting thread. I just picked up some 10 High two days ago (4/16) in the southwest suburbs of Chicago. It's still KSBW thank goodness. I even looked at the label when I bought it just to make sure it was labeled as real bourbon because the price was so cheap, despite NOT knowing that they're starting to roll out blended stuff.

I haven't opened it yet but just as I don't buy a lot of stuff I used to since I've noticed a lot of stuff getting really harsh to the point that makes it harder to discern the flavors. Some exapmples of this are EW black label, Rittenhouse BIB and Weller Antique and Reserve.

I did buy the 10 High simply for mixing but if it's still good enough I'll use it as a inexpensive straight pour. And if it still passes the test of still being a solid product... I'll soon be stocking up.

Waiahi
04-24-2009, 19:00
I just want to give a heads up...it now seems like every liquor and grocery store I go to here in Hawaii now no longer has 10 High the KSBW stocked. It has been completely replaced by the blend.

Of course this may not be true everywhere, but I suspect that you will be seeing this eventually everywhere.

If you like 10 high the KSBW, I would suggest stocking up on it before you can no longer find it.

callmeox
04-27-2009, 10:11
FWIW, during our tour of Tom Moore on Friday we asked if the bourbon was going away in lieu of the blend and we were told no.

IIRC, all of the Ten High 1.75 that were flying down the line and in the boxes were KSBW and not the blended variety.

ILLfarmboy
04-27-2009, 18:26
I checked the Ten High bottles in the store today when I picked up a fifth of Weller 12. Its still KSBW here. Since no one has seen the blend up in Chicago and I haven't seen it down here, I wonder, in light of ox's post, if it will stay a bourbon here in ILL/the midwest since I was also over on the Iowa side and it is still KSBW there to.

B3Nut
04-27-2009, 19:13
Still KSBW up here in Cheesecurdistan, too, Woodmans and Steve's Liquor still have it.

p_elliott
04-28-2009, 08:23
I peeked at it in Maryville MO the other day and it looked like it was still a straight Bourbon there as well.

Josh
04-28-2009, 10:51
FWIW, during our tour of Tom Moore on Friday we asked if the bourbon was going away in lieu of the blend and we were told no.

IIRC, all of the Ten High 1.75 that were flying down the line and in the boxes were KSBW and not the blended variety.

How strange! Why would they have both? Maybe the blend was just a temporary release to tide them over to when they had enough sb ready? Or was the blend release halted when Tom Moore was sold to Saz?

cowdery
04-28-2009, 10:54
Unfortunately, due to the impending sale, I'm not sure who to ask who would be in a position to give us an informed answer.

pausted
04-28-2009, 19:18
Here in McAllen in South Texas we have two retailers that account for most of the business in the area. Both have multiple locations. One has only the Ten High blend and the other has KSBW. I assume that the one with the blend has received a recent shipment and the other is working on stock from his warehouse. I expect that eventually it will all be the blend. To add to the confusion, the stores with the KSBW carry several Barton whiskeys...The High, Tom Moore BIB and 80, etc. The stores with the blend carry only Ten High from Barton. Probably has no significance but its interesting.

As a funny aside, the other day I was in the store that had only the blend and pointed out the change to the clerk. Of course, he didn't even know it till I called it to his attention. He said "I have a customer who buys Ten High all the time. He hasn't even mentioned the change." I thought to myself...he probably dumps it in coke or 7 up and hasn't noticed a difference.