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View Full Version : Ordinary Joe may be joining Jack and George



TNbourbon
06-21-2009, 08:54
Legislation to allow wider distilling passes Tennessee General Assembly:
http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2009/jun/20/distillery-bill-passes/

OscarV
06-21-2009, 09:02
Also looks like the folks in TN see KY's tourist industry growing because of the Bourbon Trail and they want a peice of it.

Jono
06-21-2009, 09:20
I wonder if the existing distillers look upon these changes going on across the country as "good" for business...competition effects, quality pressure, more public awareness etc. or as something to be fought due to competition etc.

If it passes in TN, a known whiskey state, then it could happen in many other states following the home wine making and microbrewery developments.

kickert
06-21-2009, 10:15
Corsair Artisan Micro Distillery (which I work for) is currently based in Nashville, but the distillery proper was opened in Bowling Green, KY because legislation in TN was so restrictive. Right now we are looking to open a second distillery location in Nashville alongside the one in Bowling Green.

Our founders were in constant discussion with the legislators in TN to make sure this went through. There are several smaller guys looking to launch micros as soon as possible.

ILLfarmboy
06-21-2009, 14:12
I wonder if the existing distillers look upon these changes going on across the country as "good" for business...competition effects, quality pressure, more public awareness etc. or as something to be fought due to competition etc.

If it passes in TN, a known whiskey state, then it could happen in many other states following the home wine making and microbrewery developments.

Something to be fought, would be my guess. Free market capitalism is always good but established companies may seek, through government action, to hobble or impede upstart competition, and that's never good.

Jono
06-21-2009, 19:31
http://www.examiner.com/x-2327-Drinks-Examiner~y2009m5d14-Kentucky-craft-distiller-debuting-Friday

Article on Corsair.....Kickert, as with most artisanal distilleries I assume vodka and gin are usually first to be marketed due to the relative speed of production....what is a "red absinthe"?

silverfish
06-21-2009, 20:04
...what is a "red absinthe"?

According to wikipedia:

"Absinthe can also be naturally colored red using
hibiscus flowers. This is called a rouge or rose
absinthe. As of now, only one historical rouge
brand has been discovered".

Jono
06-21-2009, 20:14
A red absinthe certainly adds to the uniqueness of the product and makes it stand out in the marketplace. A wise choice for an artisanal maker.

p_elliott
06-22-2009, 08:57
I wonder if there was anything in that bill that would allow for JD to start selling their product on their premises?

kickert
06-22-2009, 09:12
I wonder if there was anything in that bill that would allow for JD to start selling their product on their premises?

Before this legislation the only counties in TN where you could operate a distillery were the ones where Jack and George were already set up. All this bill did was open that up to all counties that currently allow both package sales and liquor by the drink sales. As far as I know, no other changes were made.

kickert
06-22-2009, 09:14
A red absinthe certainly adds to the uniqueness of the product and makes it stand out in the marketplace. A wise choice for an artisanal maker.

Of the 4 products we have on the market, the Absinthe is the most polarizing. Absinthe lovers can be rabid about their drink and we have had a great response from them. On the other hand, people who are not familiar with the spirit are often overwhelmed by the strong anise (black licorice) flavor.

silverfish
06-22-2009, 09:33
I wonder if there was anything in that bill that would allow for JD to start selling their product on their premises?

The JD distillery does offer some bottles
for sale. When I was there in 2007, they
had the 1981 Gold Medal and one of the
"Scenes" bottles for sale.

kickert
06-22-2009, 16:23
The JD distillery does offer some bottles
for sale. When I was there in 2007, they
had the 1981 Gold Medal and one of the
"Scenes" bottles for sale.

Current TN regs only allow "special editions" to be sold on site. That is, products that can only be purchased at that location.

TNbourbon
06-22-2009, 17:09
Current TN regs only allow "special editions" to be sold on site. That is, products that can only be purchased at that location.
No, it means not the Old #7 labels, Gentleman Jack and standard Single Barrel. In other words, they can't sell what's bottled for drinking.
I know lots of retail stores that sell the Gold Medal bottlings, etc., also sold at the distillery. What JD sells on-site -- other than the odd rare collectible, which they probably can't/won't part with routinely -- is sold elsewhere, if it's legal and available. It's not legal or available elsewhere in Metropolitan Moore County-Lynchburg, however.

kickert
06-22-2009, 17:12
No, it means not the Old #7 labels, Gentleman Jack and standard Single Barrel. In other words, they can't sell what's bottled for drinking.
I know lots of retail stores that sell the Gold Medal bottlings, etc., also sold at the distillery. What JD sells on-site -- other than the odd rare collectible, which they probably won't part with routinely -- is sold elsewhere, if it's legal. It's not legal elsewhere in Metropolitan Moore County-Lynchburg, however.

Thanks for the clarification.

cowdery
06-23-2009, 10:33
The law on sales at the distillery actually requires that anything available at the distillery must be available to all other retailers in the state. That has been in place for many years. Tennessee was first, Kentucky followed.

Prior to the passage of the new law, distilling had to be approved by a county's voters. It wasn't impossible, Prichards did it, but it was difficult. This will make it easier.

The micro-distilleries are such low volume producers that the macro-distilleries don't see them as a threat. Most people feel it's good if it gets people interested in distilled spirits products, though some feel it will confuse the consumer. So few micro-distilleries are even attempting to make an aged whiskey in the American tradition, it's hard to see them as competition.