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spun_cookie
06-30-2009, 20:15
Found this nice little spot when I was up in Spokane WA. Their whiskey and Vodka are make with Wheat.

http://www.dryflydistilling.com/main.php (http://www.dryflydistilling.com/main.php)

The 100% Wheat whiskey is good stuff... Only Washington and Binny's will have the Whiskey for the first release. The Distiller (good guy) is selling it for ~$30 for a 750... good price for a micro distiller.. the NW boys are charging 4X that...

The juice has been aged for a min of 2 yrs in Charred White Oak... I will post the two pics I took (got busy talking and forgot to take more) at a later time

DeanSheen
06-30-2009, 21:27
Not so bad a price if it's good. Sounds like you had some?

silverfish
07-01-2009, 09:04
I had the Death's Door wheat whiskey and
found it to be a nice change. I'd certainly
be interested in trying the Fly.

sku
07-01-2009, 10:53
Found this nice little spot when I was up in Spokane WA. Their whiskey and Vodka are make with Wheat.

http://www.dryflydistilling.com/main.php (http://www.dryflydistilling.com/main.php)

The 100% Wheat whiskey is good stuff... Only Washington and Binny's will have the Whiskey for the first release. The Distiller (good guy) is selling it for ~$30 for a 750... good price for a micro distiller.. the NW boys are charging 4X that...

The juice has been aged for a min of 2 yrs in Charred White Oak... I will post the two pics I took (got busy talking and forgot to take more) at a later time

The website says the whiskey is a single malt that is still ageing. Do they have a wheat whiskey as well?

jburlowski
07-01-2009, 15:07
Found this nice little spot when I was up in Spokane WA. Their whiskey and Vodka are make with Wheat.

http://www.dryflydistilling.com/main.php (http://www.dryflydistilling.com/main.php)

The 100% Wheat whiskey is good stuff... Only Washington and Binny's will have the Whiskey for the first release. The Distiller (good guy) is selling it for ~$30 for a 750... good price for a micro distiller.. the NW boys are charging 4X that...

The juice has been aged for a min of 2 yrs in Charred White Oak... I will post the two pics I took (got busy talking and forgot to take more) at a later time

How does it compare to Bernheim Wheat?

indyrider
07-06-2009, 19:30
After a lengthy email correspondence with the Dry Fly guys, hard info is available. The first bottling of the wheat will be available aug 7th in WA state and at binnys in oct. A bourbon following the wheat in the next year, with the single malt approx 5 years out.

Cant wait to try the wheat as my palate favors that over the rye...

Cheers~

callmeox
07-07-2009, 06:56
Wheated bourbon and straight wheat whiskey are different beasts.

The wheat in a bourbon mashbill is not as assertive in the flavor profile so it doesn't mask the corn sweetness like in a rye mashbill. I have a bottle of Bernheim Straight Wheat and while it is a very tasty pour, it has very little in common with a wheated bourbon. The corn sweetness of a Weller bottling is definitely absent and it is more biscuity or perhaps yeasty overall.

Rughi
07-07-2009, 07:19
Wheated bourbon and straight wheat whiskey are different beasts.

The wheat in a bourbon mashbill is not as assertive in the flavor profile so it doesn't mask the corn sweetness like in a rye mashbill. I have a bottle of Bernheim Straight Wheat and while it is a very tasty pour, it has very little in common with a wheated bourbon. The corn sweetness of a Weller bottling is definitely absent and it is more biscuity or perhaps yeasty overall.

That's one of the better explanations of wheaters I've read.

Many assume that it's the wheat that makes for the sweetness in a wheater bourbon, but it's the unmasked corn that sweetens things. Wheat is the most innocuous of bourbon grains, so much so that even in the relatively high amounts it's used (22% +/-) it's a "whisper" not a shout. 'Biscuity' is a really good description of wheat.

Roger

p_elliott
07-07-2009, 22:37
Wheated bourbon and straight wheat whiskey are different beasts.

The wheat in a bourbon mashbill is not as assertive in the flavor profile so it doesn't mask the corn sweetness like in a rye mashbill. I have a bottle of Bernheim Straight Wheat and while it is a very tasty pour, it has very little in common with a wheated bourbon. The corn sweetness of a Weller bottling is definitely absent and it is more biscuity or perhaps yeasty overall.

Scott I'm not saying your wrong just for my palate I would beg to differ. Especially with a freshly opened bottle of wheated bourbon the wheat flavor is over powering. It's like grabbing a handful of wheat and holding it up to your nose. It settles down quite a bit after the bottle has breathed for a while but it's still there to some degree. I just maybe overly sensitive to this being raised on a farm and raising horses. It taste like horse feed smells , the natural grains. I don't get that with a rye bourbon.

Stu
07-08-2009, 13:05
Please don't throw me off the site for saying this, but if you really like wheat whiskey, try Inverleven single grain whisky (from the dark side).Personally I'm not overly fond of straight wheat whisky and I prefer most bourbons with a high amount of rye (notable exception is PVW).

Jono
07-08-2009, 19:24
Ok Stu..just to tentatively advance the alternate Wheat Whisky topic...

http://www.scotchwhisky.net/grain/grain1.htm
http://www.planetwhiskies.com/grainwhiskies.html
http://www.royalmilewhiskies.com/category.asp?cat_id=W_GRAI

The links above do not specify by grain type.
How is a Scotch single grain different from a U.S. or Canadian etc...are the grains roasted over peat? The lowland product I would expect to be lightly peated at most.

It would make for an interesting tasting...going from domestic to import wheat whiskeys / whiskys.

Jono
07-09-2009, 13:50
Here is another wheat grain "spirit" unaged ..by Koval

http://www.koval-distillery.com/products/grain-spirits/midwest-wheat

I have not tried it.....their product offerings look very intriguing...will have to taste some.

It is described as having a very Banana nose and palate of cantaloupe and dried fruit...odd.

CaptainChunk
08-13-2009, 14:51
I picked up two bottles of this on Aug. 7th, the day it came out. The distillery sold out of 250 bottles in 90 minutes and I'm pretty sure the entire WA state sold out within a few hours. I was super lucky to even get the two bottles I did get.

libertybar
08-18-2009, 20:01
Well, I was able to get my hands on a few bottles, and I have to say... it's not bad. In fact, it's a pleasant, light 100% Washington wheat whiskey. It was bottled at 80proof, so they stretched the batch for sure, but I'd say that it's a good whiskey to include to your collection to stand next to the Bernheim.

The longer Alcohology blog post (http://www.alcohology.wordpress.com) about it is here, but over all, I'd say that I look forward to their batch a few disbursements from now (November/December is the next release of this 14month, 15gallon batch), when these smaller barrels will give way to the larger 53gallon barrel which will be at least two years old.

silverfish
03-13-2010, 08:44
I received the following e-mail from Dry Fly:

"The next release of Dry Fly Washington Wheat Whiskey
will be on Saturday March 27th at 8 am. A limit of 1 bottle
per person will be in effect. The retail price will be $45.70
due some changes in Washington's pricing policy.

A limited number of cases will also ship to the Washington
warehouse, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Minnesota, California,
and Arizona."

silverfish
03-19-2010, 07:36
More info on the latest release:

As a reminder, we will release batch 3 of our wheat whiskey
on Saturday March 27th at 8 am at the distillery.

The following Washington Liquor stores will also receive the
allocated number of cases per the WSLCB:

10-Store 46 - Seattle 7th and Bell
5-Store 65 - Spokane 3rd Ave.
5-Store 185 - Spokane Mission and Division
5-Store 101 - Seattle 4th Ave. South
1-Store 11 - Olympia

CaptainQ
03-19-2010, 08:20
Thanks for the info. I'm in Seattle so I'll have to keep an eye out for it.

silverfish
03-23-2010, 07:27
Latest update:

"Please note that the WSLCB Stores will not receive product by
Saturday March 27th, the date of the release at the distillery.
You can call the stores to confirm their delivery date."

silverfish
06-04-2010, 16:42
June update:

"We will release Dry Fly Wheat Whiskey Batch 4.0 on Saturday
June 12th at 8 am. As always, we limit the release to one bottle
per person, per space in line.

We will also release cases (IN LIMITED NUMBERS) to the Washington,
Oregon, Idaho, and Montana liquor systems. As we receive that info,
we'll post it!

For those who can't make this release, we'll have release 5.0 in mid
July. We should have a Wheat Whiskey release every month for the
rest of the year..."

Man, I'd sure like to try some of this stuff...

TheGentleman
09-30-2010, 19:30
i just picked up a bottle from batch 6 tonight at a local liquor store in Kentucky. I lived in Spokane for a while and really enjoyed Dry Fly's gin. This should be a real treat considering I have a soft spot for the Northwest. I'll report back on what I think of their juice.

jburlowski
10-17-2010, 16:57
Tried this at a tasting at the Party Source on Saturday. It is now a straight whiskey (aged a full two years) although the label hasn't caught up yet. I was surprised how much I liked it. Soft and delicate in flavor yet appealing... a very easy sipper. Tastes much different than Bernheim.

CaptainQ
02-07-2011, 20:53
From their Facebook page: "Dry Fly Distilling BOURBON Label was approved today. Coming soon, the first Washington State Straight Bourbon EVER!"

CorvallisCracker
02-08-2011, 12:15
From their Facebook page: "Dry Fly Distilling BOURBON Label was approved today. Coming soon, the first Washington State Straight Bourbon EVER!"

Probably too soon. :rolleyes:

GOCOUGS2002
02-08-2011, 12:57
Probably too soon. :rolleyes:

I agree Scott; I was there a couple years ago when they were just putting it in the barrel (can't remember the size, but I know it wasn't 53 gallons).

darkluna
02-08-2011, 19:09
Everyone has to start somewhere. I'm looking forward to this one. That reminds me, I have a bottle of Dry Fly wheat whiskey around here somewhere that I need to open up.

callmeox
02-09-2011, 04:39
Everyone has to start somewhere. I'm looking forward to this one. That reminds me, I have a bottle of Dry Fly wheat whiskey around here somewhere that I need to open up.

To paraphrase a comment from another thread, every underaged bottle that they sell now will be one less to sell after the bourbon has been aged fully.

But heck, I bet that it will be "interesting".:rolleyes:

cowdery
02-10-2011, 09:22
I've had some contact with the folks and Dry Fly and they seem to be among the good guys, meaning they usually agree with me. The proof of the pudding is in the tasting, of course. I'm willing to keep an open mind.

squire
02-13-2011, 17:41
I'm always in favor in supporting the good guys and wish them well. Chuck it's good to see you put agreeable nature and open mind in the same paragraph.

CaptainQ
02-26-2011, 15:15
Started in 2007, Dry Fly produces gin, vodka and all-wheat whiskey. It will release a bourbon whiskey this year. It has another whiskey under wraps due to be released later this year, Poffenroth said.

We call it Project X, and its made from a grain never used for whiskey before, he said.

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2011/feb/23/dry-fly-adds-extra-shift-equipment-to-meet-demand/

darkluna
03-01-2011, 16:11
Started in 2007, Dry Fly produces gin, vodka and all-wheat whiskey. It will release a bourbon whiskey this year. It has another whiskey under wraps due to be released later this year, Poffenroth said.

We call it Project X, and its made from a grain never used for whiskey before, he said.

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2011/feb/23/dry-fly-adds-extra-shift-equipment-to-meet-demand/

...a grain never used for whiskey before. I wonder what that would be. Quinoa? lol

squire
03-01-2011, 16:17
I was thinking millet which can make a sort of beer though I suppose any sort of grain could be made to work.

whskylvr
03-01-2011, 19:26
Maybe a RICE whiskey..... interesting to say the least.

CorvallisCracker
03-02-2011, 07:50
I'm putting five Magic Beans on teosinte.

cowdery
03-02-2011, 08:35
Koval, here in Chicago, makes whiskey from rye, wheat, oats, spelt and millet.

squire
03-02-2011, 09:55
I would like to see one of these small distillers work with sorghum. They could make a rum from the cane or a whisky from the grain.

cowdery
03-02-2011, 11:12
Unfortunately, under U.S. rules you can't call spirit made from sorghum cane juice "rum," which the rules state must be from sugar cane. Phil Prichard in Tennessee has complained about this. He makes rum from molasses and would like to make it from Tennessee sorghum too, but would have to call it a 'spirit specialty,' as there is no specific category for spirits made from sorghum.

I know the Chinese make something they call whiskey from sorghum but I don't know if they use the grain or the juice. If fact, I don't know if I've ever heard about sorghum grain being used, although sorghum is considered a potential feedstock for fuel ethanol production.

squire
03-02-2011, 12:56
It takes an Act of Congress, jeez.

cowdery
03-02-2011, 12:58
It takes an Act of Congress, jeez.

Not quite. Producers could petition for a rules change, which TTB has the authority to grant. It doesn't require a new statute.

squire
03-02-2011, 13:45
Was speaking figuratively Chuck, I presumed the changes were regulatory.

cowdery
03-02-2011, 14:28
I presumed as much but never miss an opportunity to extend some knowledge to the world.

Jonny.Applebury
06-02-2011, 19:59
Unfortunately, under U.S. rules you can't call spirit made from sorghum cane juice "rum," which the rules state must be from sugar cane. Phil Prichard in Tennessee has complained about this. He makes rum from molasses and would like to make it from Tennessee sorghum too, but would have to call it a 'spirit specialty,' as there is no specific category for spirits made from sorghum.

I know the Chinese make something they call whiskey from sorghum but I don't know if they use the grain or the juice. If fact, I don't know if I've ever heard about sorghum grain being used, although sorghum is considered a potential feedstock for fuel ethanol production.

I live in Madison, WI, and a local distiller who has been operating for about a year has made a spirit that he is calling whiskey. Sorghum whiskey, actually. When he first told me this, I thought back to what I'd read in the U.S. TTB regulations and thought that his spirit wouldn't be allowed to be called whiskey. I didn't tell him this, since causing a stir doesn't really do anyone much good.

Take a look at his webpage that hints at his upcoming sorghum whiskey. Anyone think he's going to get in trouble if he labels it as whiskey? Or do you think that his label just won't get approved? I've heard from local beer brewers that getting a label approved can be rough, so I figured the same may be true for distillers bottling spirits.

http://www.madisondistillery.com/Limited_Release.html

And, this is my first post on these forums.

tmckenzie
06-03-2011, 04:09
sorghum is a grain, so he can call it whiskey.

White Dog
06-03-2011, 12:21
Interesting. Aeppletreow of Wisconsin already makes a Sorghum distillate that it calls "Brown Dog," but the word "Whiskey" is not used on the label. The owner of Aeppletreow has said that Sorghum is not considered a cereal grain by the feds, so he could not use the term "Whiskey."

Looks like Old Sugar is lifting his idea.

Jonny.Applebury
08-05-2011, 14:52
Here is an update on the sorghum whiskey from Madison, WI. The word "whiskey" does appear on the label. I've uploaded the label so you guys can have a look.

From the discussion here, this seems to go against what the law allows. Are there exceptions that would allow something to be labeled "sorghum whiskey?"

Jon

cowdery
08-06-2011, 11:34
Sorghum is a grain, so what's the problem? Pritchard, in Tennessee, wanted to make spirit from sorghum and call it rum, which wasn't allowed. Since sorghum is a grain, if a sorghum spirit isn't whiskey, what is it?

More to the point, how is it?

There is a fair amount of chatter among micro-distilleries about TTB giving conflicting guidance and it's not to surprising, since they're getting a volume of COLA requests like never before, and for things they've never had to deal with before. It could be that after some people had requests for sorghum whiskey rejected, somebody asked the same question I did above. TTB didn't have a good answer so they decided it was whiskey after all.

For the record, the SOI says "grain," not "cereal grain," though that could certainly be interpreted to mean from grain, i.e., seeds, and not from some other part of the plant.

Jonny.Applebury
08-06-2011, 11:46
Edit: Looks like I was typing this as Chuck was writing his response.

I stopped by the Old Sugar Distillery last night to try the new sorghum spirit. It was the first time I have been there. The distillery location doubles as a bar that serves up the distillery's products, and drinks mixed with those products. I was surprised to see that the outdoor patio was full, and the indoor area was, too. All told, probably about 50 to 60 patrons.

My surprise was from an expectation that a small distillery wouldn't attract so much attention, but after seeing and speaking with some people there, I understood. The patrons are extremely supportive of local product, and this being Wisconsin, people also love their liquor. That combined with the location being remote enough from the Capitol and the traditional downtown bars, this Madison distillery regularly attracts a large crowd when the weather is nice.

I digress. The reason for my visit, tasting the new spirit, had me asking about it immediately after sitting down. The bar lady poured me a sample, gratis. It had a sweet and very alcoholic nose, and didn't smell at all like any whiskey, bourbon, or whisky I've ever had. It was very light on the tongue, with no oil, cream, or heaviness at all. The flavor was more like a spiced, or over-charred (but not smoky or peaty) rum.

I asked Nathan, the owner and distiller, how he makes this spirit. He said it was made from the syrup-like juice that comes from pressed sorghum. He puts that juice into the still, along with some other fermented liquid. The hearts come off the still at either 120 or 140 proof, depending on whether he has the extra diamond on the still (see the still he uses, here: http://www.coppermoonshinestills.com/id51.html). He didn't say to which proof this spirit was distilled. It is then aged in 5 gallon, heavily charred new oak barrels.

When I asked the age, I was told more about the preparation for distillation and the barrels, but not given the age. I guessed it to be about 6 months old since the distillery has only been open about a year, and I first heard about the attempt to make this spirit about half a year back.

Overall, I did not enjoy the new spirit. I believe my opinion is tainted by the expectations set by calling it whiskey. I'm sure that I would have been less critical had it been named something else, however, I wouldn't have made the special trip to the distillery just to try it had it not been labeled as whiskey.

Jon

P.S. I actually had a flight of all of their spirits, including another glass of sorghum spirit, after tasting the first sample. I didn't find any to be stellar, but the ouzo was my favorite. I've never had ouzo, and I don't expect this is too similar to the traditional Greek. I did enjoy the very licorice-y taste. Nathan told it was made with lots and lots of star anise.