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avery
12-09-2002, 09:22
I'm somewhat new to the bourbon world, so I have a couple of questions. I don't have a lot of money to spend, I would say $20-25 a month or less that I would want to spend. I realize that there are a multitude of bourbons out there in this price range, but I was looking for suggestions on what to try. I would like to try a bottle or two per month, with varying characteristics. I'd like to try a wide variety so that I can get a feel for what's out there and what I like. The only bottle that I've actually owned, and not just tried, is Evan Williams 7 year. It is inexpensive and I liked it.

My second question is on tasting. Reading over the posts here, it seems that everyone has their own ideas on tasting. I'd like to be able to pick out the nuances and flavors, but I'm not sure what to look for. What characteristics do you look? Do you use a certain glass?

Thanks in advance!

**DONOTDELETE**
12-09-2002, 16:14
OK Avery that's pretty easy. At around 10 bucks a bottle you're going to limited to everything on the bottom shelf and some mainstream middle shelf choices. Try getting a bottle of well known brands from each distillery. From Barton Brands see if you can find Very Old Barton. From Brown-Forman try Old Forester. From Jim Beam try Jim Beam and Old Grand Dad.From Buffalo Trace try some Ancient Ancient Age 10 Star. From Heaven Hill you've already tried Evan Williams so shoot for Elija Craig. From Wild Turkey you have to try their No.8 101 proof, but that will bust your budget slightly as it runs around $17 depending on how prices are in Kansas. TexasCarl seems to get some very good buys in Kansas City. Maker's Mark is priced outside of your budget constraints. For a wheated bourbon you could try any of the following; Rebel Yell, Virginia Gentleman 'Red Label', Old Fitzgerald, or W.L. Weller. Yes I use specialized glassware, but that would also bust your budget. You can easily get buy with a simple double old fashion 'rocks glass' and a shotglass for neat nosing and sipping. A small glass mixing bowl can also come in handy. Welcome to Bourbonia and Happy Tasting! http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthreads/images/icons/smile.gif

bobbyc
12-09-2002, 18:16
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
A small glass mixing bowl can also come in handy.

[/QUOTE]
Why does the thought of this cause me to cringe? Is it because I've witnessed Linn's drinking prowness?
Would I be wrong to assume had he gone on a bit more , that a clean 1.75 ml bottle and 5 gallon bucket might also have been mentioned as useful tools for our purposes here! http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthreads/images/icons/grin.gif
Sorry Linn , Bobby( with an eye toward the cheap shot) C http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthreads/images/icons/smirk.gif

MurphyDawg
12-09-2002, 18:22
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
Bobby( with an eye toward the cheap shot) C

[/QUOTE]



Now there's a mighty witty pun, considering the thread.

Tom (Call 'em like I see 'em) C

MurphyDawg
12-09-2002, 18:25
Linns pretty much on it unless you are limiting yourself to a bottle a month, though I would add Old Ezra 7 year 101 proof as a good cheap example of a third party bottling around $11.


TomC

jbutler
12-09-2002, 22:32
I think Bobby, that it must have been merely an oversight on your part for not mentioning that five gallon buckets can be had at no charge by stopping by any new construction site while the painters are around.

As long as the paint on the inside is dry, the bucket should make a fine imbibing utensil.

Oh, I almost forgot; be sure to only get buckets that have had 100% acrylic in them. Ethanol will wake latex up.

bobbyc
12-10-2002, 13:31
An oversight indeed , Any that have had drywall mud in them are fine too. If that's a bit much then a brand new unused 5 gallon bucket can be had from Lowes or Home Depot for around 2 bucks! http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthreads/images/icons/grin.gif

avery
12-11-2002, 01:17
Linn -- Thanks for taking the time to reply. No doubt this is a question that has been asked many times. I've spent a considerable amount of time reading through the old threads. It certainly is a wealth of knowledge -- many useful posts here. Because of this, and your reply, and I have a fairly good list of bourbons in my price range that are considered to be good. Some of these even seem to be favorites and "every day pours". I also have compiled a list of "special occasion" bourbons for when I decide to break my budget. I think that it would serve me well to start from the bottom up, though. That way, I could truly appreciate the high-end variety by being able to compare it to lower varieties.

I'm just getting started, though. It might take a while to get my senses trained, but with any luck I'll be able to make some contribution to this forum.

Thanks!

bobbyc
12-11-2002, 06:44
Welcome On, Avery, You're at the right place to begin your Bourbonic Journey! http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthreads/images/icons/grin.gif

MurphyDawg
12-11-2002, 23:43
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
I'm just getting started, though. It might take a while to get my senses trained, but with any luck I'll be able to make some contribution to this forum.


[/QUOTE]

Please do. . . .there are no geniuses here, we are all travelling the road to bourbonic nirvana. . . . .and I have found that for me its the more travelling, the better!


Rock on man!
TomC