PDA

View Full Version : Literally on the rocks



MarkEdwards
08-31-2009, 16:53
I was browsing through the Think Geek website today, and found these:

http://www.thinkgeek.com/caffeine/accessories/ba37/

No, I'm not a shill for Think Geek, but I thought y'all might enjoy the blurb from their site, and maybe even the idea of putting frozen rocks in your glass (big grin).

Here's the blurb:
=================
Lukewarm is the enemy

Okay, water is awesome. We canít deny that. And perhaps its best feature is that it can freeze (You know that "ice" stuff? That's made of water!). And not to mention that when frozen, itís practically perfect for warm beverages.

But wait, there's a catch!

If the temperature doesnít stay below freezing, then the hard water starts to melt and your drink becomes all watery and doesn't taste good anymore. It's all very scientific stuff. You wouldnít understand.

Luckily, a few great soapstone workers in Perkinsville, Vermont have created Whiskey Stones. These little ice-imitators are specially designed to put a slight chill in your Whiskey. All you do is put them in the freezer for a few hours and then pop a couple into a glass of single malt. Once you're done, rinse, dry and do it all over again! And no need to worry about a watery drink, because these stones don't dilute (thatís the best part). Dylan Thomas would've loved these things. We hope you will too.
=================

silverfish
09-01-2009, 09:07
I was browsing through the Think Geek website today, and found these:

http://www.thinkgeek.com/caffeine/accessories/ba37/


I have some of these!

I thought they sounded like a nice alternative for
a cold drink without watering it down. Have used
them a couple times this summer and didn't really
notice any added taste from the stones. My only
gripe was that they didn't stay as cold as an ice
cube (even used 4 stones) but still worked fairly
well. Just be sure to slide them down the side
into your glass and not drop them in!

p_elliott
09-01-2009, 09:38
The Scott's use literally chilled rocks in scotch.