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billthewoodguy
10-15-2009, 08:37
I have been searching for barrels in the 1-2 gal size, charred not toasted.:cool:
both of these sites have barrels from 2L. to 20L. with a medium char. and there pricing is the cheapest I've been able to find.

www.milehidistilling.com

www.thebarrelsource.com

OscarV
10-15-2009, 13:26
What are you going to do with the barrel?

ILLfarmboy
10-15-2009, 13:31
After staring at the girl in the cowboy hat for a while, I began to wonder if any of the hot plates used are rheostat controlled or are they just on/off. The ability to adjust the heat output would seem to be advantageous, finer kettle temp control, you know, if one was to distill their own, you know, water.:grin:

Then I stared at the girl a little longer and forgot to check out their barrels.

smokinjoe
10-15-2009, 13:51
After staring at the girl in the cowboy hat for a while, I began to wonder if any of the hot plates used are rheostat controlled or are they just on/off. The ability to adjust the heat output would seem to be advantageous, finer kettle temp control, you know, if one was to distill their own, you know, water.:grin:

Then I stared at the girl a little longer and forgot to check out their barrels.

OK, now I'm going to have to look at the links. Brad, she better look like I hope she looks, and not just some fugly holding an AR-15. ;)

George
10-15-2009, 13:58
After staring at the girl in the cowboy hat for a while, I began to wonder if any of the hot plates used are rheostat controlled or are they just on/off. The ability to adjust the heat output would seem to be advantageous, finer kettle temp control, you know, if one was to distill their own, you know, water.:grin:

Then I stared at the girl a little longer and forgot to check out their barrels.

She's wearing a hat? I hadn't noticed. :grin:

billthewoodguy
10-15-2009, 14:10
I intend to do some experiments, such as rebarreling some bourbon and perhaps putting some clear into one or two.
the results will be made available at sampler.

fishnbowljoe
10-15-2009, 14:56
After staring at the girl in the cowboy hat for a while, I began to wonder if any of the hot plates used are rheostat controlled or are they just on/off. The ability to adjust the heat output would seem to be advantageous, finer kettle temp control, you know, if one was to distill their own, you know, water.:grin:

Then I stared at the girl a little longer and forgot to check out their barrels.

I think her name is Emerson. :grin: Joe

cowdery
10-15-2009, 17:19
The Barrel Source products look like what Binny's has, probably the one liter model. Binny's has it for $40, if I remember correctly.

On the web site Barrel Source conflates charring and toasting, which is incorrect. I would probably ask them to clarify that before I bought one, because which you want would depend on what you are trying to do. If you're working with new make (i.e., white dog), you probably want a real char. If you are rebarreling something that has already spent some time in charred wood, a medium toast would be just the thing.

I have heard that the spigots leak. They might be smart to make a model in which a simple thief (i.e., pipette) is provided instead of the spigot.

Lost Pollito
10-15-2009, 19:18
I haven't had any spigot problems thus far. I'd suggest soaking the barrel with some water before you fill, or expect a very thirsty barrel. :skep: 2nd fill on these little barrel's seems to be a bit friendlier than 1st fill. fwiw.

tommyboy38
10-16-2009, 07:50
Do the distilleries add any water or spirits to a barrel to "season" it before filling with white dog?

OscarV
10-16-2009, 13:49
Do the distilleries add any water or spirits to a barrel to "season" it before filling with white dog?



Good question, but I don't think so, from what I have seen they fill the barrels to the max with white dog ozzing out when they hammer in the bung.

cowdery
10-16-2009, 14:11
Do the distilleries add any water or spirits to a barrel to "season" it before filling with white dog?

No. You want a thirsty barrel that will soak up all the spirit. That's what is supposed to happen. That's how it works.

If you're buying one of these little barrels just to use it as a dispenser, then by all means condition it with a water fill first. But if your purpose is aging, then let it work the way it's supposed to work.

billthewoodguy
10-19-2009, 05:45
just curious, if your purpose is to continue aging, say some WT101, would a charred barrel unconditioned be the way to go?
Or would you recommend a conditioned toasted barrel?

barturtle
10-19-2009, 06:00
just curious, if your purpose is to continue aging, say some WT101, would a charred barrel unconditioned be the way to go?
Or would you recommend a conditioned toasted barrel?

I would think that if I wanted to continue aging something I would use a charred, used barrel. For example I would purchase a charred new barrel and fill it with some other whiskey, something that I would either consider a total loss, like some current Old Crow; or maybe try filling with some corn whiskey, like Mellow Corn BIB.

cowdery
10-19-2009, 15:25
It depends on what you want, but I really like what Woodford Reserve got when they finished a fully-aged bourbon in very well seasoned (three to five years!) barrels that had merely been toasted, not charred. Were I doing a rebarrel, that's what I'd be tempted to use. Of course, what's probably available is a lightly seasoned new toasted barrel, but I still think I would use that over a charred barrel for rebarreling something that has already done five or six years in a new charred barrel.

Part of my reasoning is that a rebarreler is not likely to wait the four or five years it would take for the charred barrel to do anything properly balanced, but a finishing barrel can show good results in a few months.

tommyboy38
10-23-2009, 08:00
I think I found part of the answer I was looking for last night on TV.
The showed some barrels that were headed for JD in TN.
At the cooperage (I think), the added some water and pressurized air to make sure the barrel did not leak. My thought from my original post was that it would be better to lose water than white dog if there were any concerns about barrel leakage.

cowdery
10-23-2009, 08:31
I think I found part of the answer I was looking for last night on TV.
The showed some barrels that were headed for JD in TN.
At the cooperage (I think), the added some water and pressurized air to make sure the barrel did not leak. My thought from my original post was that it would be better to lose water than white dog if there were any concerns about barrel leakage.

Now that I think about it, yes, that is the final check at Brown-Forman cooperage, in Louisville, but it's quick. They don't give the water a chance to soak in.