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loose proton
02-24-2010, 18:33
What's the age of current OGD 114?

nblair
02-24-2010, 19:52
Funny, I got my first bottle of OGD 114 a couple days ago and was wondering the same thing. I'm not so sure anyone knows exactly, but I'm intrigued.

SMOWK
02-24-2010, 20:31
I'm curious person #3

Gillman
02-25-2010, 03:02
I don`t have my 1987 World Guide to Whisky handy, but something tells me Jackson may have written it is 10-12 years (or was then at any rate). If anyone has their copy to hand, they might check.

Gary

Josh
02-25-2010, 05:40
I don`t have my 1987 World Guide to Whisky handy, but something tells me Jackson may have written it is 10-12 years (or was then at any rate). If anyone has their copy to hand, they might check.

Gary

Jacko says that the 114 was, at that time, 10 years old and barrel proof.

Gillman
02-25-2010, 06:02
Okay thanks.

Gary

BigRich
02-25-2010, 08:13
Chuck said he thought it was between 4 and 6.

http://chuckcowdery.blogspot.com/2009/11/retro-bourbon-you-really-must-try-old.html

nor02lei
02-25-2010, 09:13
I don`t have my 1987 World Guide to Whisky handy, but something tells me Jackson may have written it is 10-12 years (or was then at any rate). If anyone has their copy to hand, they might check.

Gary

I had a side by side of OGD114 from the 80-is and the currant Beam version in April Gary. It was very much more wood in the older Frankfurt version so I guess the newer is younger. I did personally like he currant better though as I thought the spiciness was to discrete under all the wood in the ND version.

Leif

Gillman
02-25-2010, 09:41
Thanks Leif, and Rich.

Gary

smokinjoe
02-25-2010, 09:51
I had a side by side of OGD114 from the 80-is and the currant Beam version in April Gary. It was very much more wood in the older Frankfurt version so I guess the newer is younger. I did personally like he currant better though as I thought the spiciness was to discrete under all the wood in the ND version.

Leif

I prefer the newer bottling, as well Leif. I know the mashbill was supposedly retained without adulteration, post sale to Beam. But, I really have a tough time tasting the similarities between old and new. The current is much more flavorful, IMO. That "slightly burnt corners of the brownie pan" taste. One of my top 5 bourbons today.

ErichPryde
02-25-2010, 10:57
it's all about ND's lost barrel selection.

DeanSheen
02-25-2010, 11:51
We better shut this thread down quick before someone from Beam Global figures out that some of the bourbon heads favorite product of theirs is also one of the cheaper offerings they have. That just can't stand!

cowdery
02-25-2010, 11:57
I guess 4 to 6 -- and it is just a guess -- because it's at least 4 (no age statement) and usually, if something is more than 6, they declare it. Also, 114 probably is not barrel proof, though it's probably close.

OscarV
02-25-2010, 14:02
We better shut this thread down quick before someone from Beam Global figures out that some of the bourbon heads favorite product of theirs is also one of the cheaper offerings they have. That just can't stand!

Or worse yet, they'll do like Buffalo Trace and discontinue it.

DeanSheen
02-25-2010, 14:19
Now ya went and done it Oscar!

http://img.epinions.com/images/opti/61/28/fddkSpiritsBy_NameAllEagle_Rare_10_Year_Old_Kentuc ky_Straight_Bourbon_Whiskey-resized200.gif

OscarV
02-25-2010, 14:32
Now ya went and done it Oscar!

http://img.epinions.com/images/opti/61/28/fddkSpiritsBy_NameAllEagle_Rare_10_Year_Old_Kentuc ky_Straight_Bourbon_Whiskey-resized200.gif

Dude!! You trying to get me in trouble?
Every liquor store I sell in the owner gives me the evil eye,...
now this,...:bigeyes:

burghguy
02-25-2010, 15:21
Man that brings back memories. My first taste of bourbon was OGD114 and ginger ale. Drank that all through my younger years before I replaced the ginger ale with a splash of water. OGD 114 is some mighty fine bourbon at a very reasonable price

jburlowski
02-25-2010, 16:43
I don't believe that the current OGD 114 is anywhere near 10 yo. I think Chuck is closer... I'd say 5-6 years.

Any hooo, I love the high-rye, high-proof punch of OGD 114 and always have a bottle open on my bar.

It may be the best bottling that Beam currently distributes.

Old Lamplighter
02-25-2010, 17:54
It may be the best bottling that Beam currently distributes.

Absolutely....no doubt about it.

wskybnt
02-26-2010, 20:39
I dont know if its the best beam offering, I dont even favor it over the BIB. It is great bourbon though. Anything 114 proof under $25 is a steal...

DeanSheen
02-26-2010, 22:11
I dont know if its the best beam offering, I dont even favor it over the BIB. It is great bourbon though. Anything 114 proof under $25 is a steal...

Well I'm on the edge of my seat, what do you favor?

NOBourbon
03-20-2010, 13:49
I just picked up a bottle of OGD 114 for $20. I'm wondering, how does it stack up to my daily pour of EWB NAS 86? The EW is my go to bourbon during frugal times. Never had the OGD.

Also, would you consider $20 a good price for that bottle?

Thanks,

Larry

loose proton
03-21-2010, 17:58
Also, would you consider $20 a good price for that bottle?
I pay $24 plus sales tax.

smokinjoe
03-21-2010, 19:36
I just picked up a bottle of OGD 114 for $20. I'm wondering, how does it stack up to my daily pour of EWB NAS 86? The EW is my go to bourbon during frugal times. Never had the OGD.

Also, would you consider $20 a good price for that bottle?

Thanks,

Larry

I think you did very well, Larry. $20 is on the low side of what you'll find OGD114 in most places around the country. I pay twice that for other bourbons that I enjoy half as much as the 114. :crazy:

cowdery
03-21-2010, 21:38
One thing to remember about NAS products, especially good ones, is that they typically contain whiskeys of several different ages. Because it is a straight and NAS, everything in the bottle must be at least 4-years-old, but mixed in could be some 6, 8, 10, 12 -- who knows?

That's an example of blending as an art, but we don't want to call it 'blending' lest it be confused with GNS-packed 'blended whiskey.' Brands like OGD can do this better than Jim Beam white because Jim Beam white is so huge, it's inevitably mostly 4- to 5-year-old, with a dollop of older stuff here and there.

My sense of Beam, and Daniel's the same way, is that pretty much they have to start dumping on the whiskey's birthday. They have some wiggle room to let some age a bit longer, but not much.

Because they don't make much OGD, they probably make it infrequently. My guess would be once a year, and they might make two days of it, maybe three. Then they spend another three or four days making all of the rye whiskey for the year.

In both cases they don't want to make too little so they tend to make too much, which means they always have some to keep aging at the end of the year.

Setting up the distillery to make a different recipe is like a car factory re-tooling for a new model. They don't want to do it any more often than they have to. If they're running OGD and the rye more than once year then it's once each season, i.e., twice a year.

OGD is a win-win. It's a good value for us but it's actually very profitable for Beam. It sells for more than Jim white, is maybe slightly more expensive to make, but they spend zero on marketing it. Obviously they make a lot more on Beam because of the volume, but OGD has a better margin.

NOBourbon
03-22-2010, 09:17
Thanks for the responses. Here's the deal. I gave up bourbon for Lent (partly as a sacrifice and partly just to prove to myself that I could) and have been stocking my bar with a bottle a week for my Easter Sunday tasting. The OGD 114 was this past weekends addition.

Man this is a long Lent this year.

matthew0715
03-22-2010, 09:27
My guess would be once a year, and they might make two days of it, maybe three. Then they spend another three or four days making all of the rye whiskey for the year.

I'm mildy surprised that they spend less time making OGD, (which gets bottled at 86, 100, 114 proof and as Basil Hayden) which seems to have very wide distribution, than making ryes (for JB rye, ri1, and Old Overholt) which have more limited distribution. Perhaps some of the rye ends up in Beam Global's blends: Kessler and Calvert Extra.

Matt

T Comp
03-22-2010, 09:56
One thing to remember about NAS products, especially good ones, is that they typically contain whiskeys of several different ages. Because it is a straight and NAS, everything in the bottle must be at least 4-years-old, but mixed in could be some 6, 8, 10, 12 -- who knows?

That's an example of blending as an art, but we don't want to call it 'blending' lest it be confused with GNS-packed 'blended whiskey.' Brands like OGD can do this better than Jim Beam white because Jim Beam white is so huge, it's inevitably mostly 4- to 5-year-old, with a dollop of older stuff here and there.

My sense of Beam, and Daniel's the same way, is that pretty much they have to start dumping on the whiskey's birthday. They have some wiggle room to let some age a bit longer, but not much.

Because they don't make much OGD, they probably make it infrequently. My guess would be once a year, and they might make two days of it, maybe three. Then they spend another three or four days making all of the rye whiskey for the year.

In both cases they don't want to make too little so they tend to make too much, which means they always have some to keep aging at the end of the year.

Setting up the distillery to make a different recipe is like a car factory re-tooling for a new model. They don't want to do it any more often than they have to. If they're running OGD and the rye more than once year then it's once each season, i.e., twice a year.

OGD is a win-win. It's a good value for us but it's actually very profitable for Beam. It sells for more than Jim white, is maybe slightly more expensive to make, but they spend zero on marketing it. Obviously they make a lot more on Beam because of the volume, but OGD has a better margin.

It is posts like these that make my day and make me glad to be a part of SB. It gives great insight to those of us (or at least me) who have never been involved in the marketing or making of any product, let alone bourbon.

cowdery
03-22-2010, 10:29
I'm mildy surprised that they spend less time making OGD, (which gets bottled at 86, 100, 114 proof and as Basil Hayden) which seems to have very wide distribution, than making ryes (for JB rye, ri1, and Old Overholt) which have more limited distribution. Perhaps some of the rye ends up in Beam Global's blends: Kessler and Calvert Extra.

Matt

It was just a guess and you might be right. They might use some of the OGD juice in the blends as well. The point, though, is that they make rye and OGD for a handful of days, and probably at Clermont, the smaller of the two plants. The rest of the time they're cranking out the standard Jim Beam recipe, which is used for everything else.

JamesW
03-22-2010, 18:35
Absolutely....no doubt about it.

I concur as well. I'm having a snort right now and for $20 it's the best value around.

AVB
03-23-2010, 05:59
Come to the state of PA and pay $30 each by special order. Oh, and you have to get six at a time. Yet another reason why the PLCB sucks.



Also, would you consider $20 a good price for that bottle?

Thanks,

Larry