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View Full Version : Johnnie Walker Black vs Dewar's 12 yr.



thanis
03-20-2010, 01:32
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6810

Can someone help me out.

First time I've had Dewar's 12 yr (had other Dewar's before, but not 12).

Have sipped JW black often enough.

I think I like Dewar's (suprised by this, been drinking JW black so long).

If anyone has tried the two, I'm thinking the wheel from the other post would help help explain the difference in the right jargon.

Most reviews state they have a very similar profiles, and I can taste that, but I think I can taste more peat in JW black, and the Dewar's 12 is a little sweeter, but no were near a bourbon.

Am I getting the flavors I'm tasting right?

Dramiel McHinson
03-20-2010, 16:55
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6810

Can someone help me out.

Most reviews state they have a very similar profiles, and I can taste that, but I think I can taste more peat in JW black, and the Dewar's 12 is a little sweeter, but no were near a bourbon.

Am I getting the flavors I'm tasting right?

I've had my fair share of both. I call Dewars a Floral-Fruity and JWB Smokey-Peaty. But neither fit that category as clearly as single malts to me. I get hints of the floral-fruity profile a lot of Speyside single malts have in the Dewars. I can get a hint of the peat and smoke of the Islays and Skye (Talisker) from JWB but if I rated JWB on a scale of 1-10 with one being barely there and 10 being a peat monster then JWB is a 1.5 to 2. That doesn't mean they aren't enjoyable and very popular brands. Their sales indicate they have a good following.

I think you are spot on in your assessment. And since we all will describe the same bottle different ways, your assessment alone will fit your endeavor perfectly. A broad set of opinions will generally agree on key nose and palate traits but we will get a lot of other descriptive terms that are unique to the individual.

I read extensively here in the SB before I try something I haven't tried before to get an idea if it's worth the money to give it a go. It helps that I have a very wide range of tastes I can enjoy.

Megawatt
03-21-2010, 14:39
That is exactly how I remember Dewar's 12. Similar to Johnnie Black but a touch less smoke. Both are great blends and I'm not sure which I'd rather have.

AVB
03-21-2010, 19:52
I'm pretty happy with both but the Dewar's makes me want to go drink Aberfeldy while the JWB doesn't.

cowdery
03-21-2010, 23:59
Well, you know, men have five needs: food, clothing, shelter, whiskey, and strange whiskey.

Does your Johnnie Black know you've been cheating on it?

Taste is subjective. I've had my share of the major blends over the years and JWB is my favorite. It has a malty and maybe even a little bit of a bourbony body. That's what I like about it, the others seem tinny by comparison.

AVB
03-22-2010, 11:11
Your real name wouldn't be Maslow before you changed it?

cowdery
03-22-2010, 12:06
Actually, I stole the joke from Bill Maher. He probably got it from Maslow.

texascarl
09-25-2010, 19:39
I happen to like both - just tried the McIvor 12 year as well. Might qualify as a nice halfway point between the 2 - not as sweet as Dewar's 12, not as smokey as JWB. Nicely priced, add it to the shelf right between the other 2. Menage a whisky.

silverfish
09-25-2010, 20:47
Well, you know, men have five needs: food, clothing, shelter, whiskey, and strange whiskey.

I thought the five were sugar, starch, fat, grease, and alcohol.
Or maybe those're the five food groups...


Actually, I stole the joke from Bill Maher. He probably got it from Maslow.

I stole mine from Diamond Dave.

unclebunk
09-26-2010, 10:18
Taste is subjective. I've had my share of the major blends over the years and JWB is my favorite. It has a malty and maybe even a little bit of a bourbony body. That's what I like about it, the others seem tinny by comparison.

My sentiments exactly. I had JWB last night for the first time in several months and rediscovered why I love it so much. (It helps that it's made in Kilmarnock, Scotland where my family hails from and many still live!)

The Boozer
09-29-2010, 11:24
JWB's malt is primarily Caol Ila & Talisker whereas Dewer's 12 yr is mostly Speyside single malts ( Glenlivet or Glenfiddich, plus some others.) Very little or none of the Islay in Dewer's.
Like them both, depends of the mood.

AVB
09-29-2010, 11:49
I think you mean Cardhu and Talisker. There isn't that much bite in JWB to have two Islay style malts as the primary ingredients.


JWB's malt is primarily Caol Ila & Talisker whereas Dewer's 12 yr is mostly Speyside single malts ( Glenlivet or Glenfiddich, plus some others.) Very little or none of the Islay in Dewer's.
Like them both, depends of the mood.

Josh
09-29-2010, 12:22
Talisker isn't an Islay is it? I think it's made on the Isle of Skye.

I've been exploring Scotch blends today (well two of them anyway) and I just finished a Chivas Regal and ordered at JWB. The Chivas was fine, lots of caramel, but this JWB is different kettle of fish altogether. The nose has an odd (to me) fruity, honey note, but the island character really comes through in the finish with a nice hit of brine and peat.

smokinjoe
09-29-2010, 12:51
I think you mean Cardhu and Talisker. There isn't that much bite in JWB to have two Islay style malts as the primary ingredients.

Knowing that you've probably forgotten more than I'll ever know about the subject, still, I'm itching to add to the discussion. :)I attended a very well done presentation/tasting by JWB 7-8yrs ago. They poured Cardhu, Talisker, Lagavulin, and Oban as precursors to the JW Black. The explanation was that these were the "primary?, main?, something-like-that" malts in JWBlack.
JWB is my fave blend.

AVB
09-29-2010, 13:14
Talisker is made on Skye but it is an Islay style.

Many malts go into JWB but from what I have been told Cardhu and Talisker were the main two. I can see having others of the same style so that if one happens to be in short supply you can increase another and still have the blend fairly close to what it was. I was just disagreeing that Caol Ila was a "main" component.

The Boozer
09-29-2010, 16:26
I think you mean Cardhu and Talisker. There isn't that much bite in JWB to have two Islay style malts as the primary ingredients.

I heard from one source it was Coal Ila and then read somewhere it was Cardhu. Coin flip. Also read that there are some 3 dozen different single malts that go into JWB so it is unlikely that any distinct flavor from any single malt is going to stand out.