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tmas
03-28-2010, 11:29
I'm sure venison goes very nicely with bourbon, but I have a question that I have a feeling I will get an answer to on SB. I have a sizeable piece of venison flank that has been sitting in my freezer for about 5 years or so. I purchased it intending to make it on a timely basis and I never got around to it. Just wondering if any SB venison admirer might have an idea as to whether I should toss it or if it is likely to still be edible?

Dramiel McHinson
03-28-2010, 11:49
I'm sure venison goes very nicely with bourbon, but I have a question that I have a feeling I will get an answer to on SB. I have a sizeable piece of venison flank that has been sitting in my freezer for about 5 years or so. I purchased it intending to make it on a timely basis and I never got around to it. Just wondering if any SB venison admirer might have an idea as to whether I should toss it or if it is likely to still be edible?

It will be okay if it was well packaged and doesn't have freezer burn. You might as well pull it out, thaw it and look at the meat real good. If it has grayish areas that are dry and rough you can cut that part off and if the meat is good underneath you still have something to work with. No funky freezer smell is another clue. Usually, if there is no obvious clues the meat is bad then I'll use it in soups as this cooks the meat very well and any slight degradation in taste or texture due to long storage in a freezer are not noticeable.

I usually marinate the meat, cube it, sear it and then slow cook it with the stew or soup like I would beef or pork. In the end it's got to be your eyes and nose that tells you it's okay or not. If it turns out you don't want to risk it, then toss it and start over.

Hope it works out!

tmas
03-28-2010, 14:20
Thanks for that info Dan, if you could tell me what you would marinate it in and for how long I would really appreciate it.

pepcycle
03-28-2010, 14:52
If you add papaya to the marinade on game, it helps tame the game and tenderizes with papain.
Don't make the marinade to acidic with vinegar or citrus.

callmeox
03-28-2010, 14:56
If you add papaya to the marinade on game, it helps tame the game and tenderizes with papain.
Don't make the marinade to acidic with vinegar or citrus.

Agrees

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_IGiaEWUG_gI/SDtUgGxvrTI/AAAAAAAAAB4/B-FUY7Fij2Y/s400/Kramer.jpg

Dramiel McHinson
03-28-2010, 15:04
Thanks for that info Dan, if you could tell me what you would marinate it in and for how long I would really appreciate it.

I use a marinade that compliments the particular stew or soup that I'm making but here are a two favorites that might do. Per the other cautions about vinegar and citrus, you can try a small amount first before you do the whole piece.

For simple: use vinegar and oil based italian salad dressing from the bottle. Soak the meat no less than thirty minutes. You can soak overnight in the refrigerator but too long (all the next day too) might make the taste too strong or break the meat down too far.

The recipe below makes 2.75 cups. You can save any portion that you don't use but don't pour any back into the container that was in contact with the meat.

1 cup Bourbon
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 cup catsup
2 tsp Worchestershire sauce
1/4 cup white vinegar
1 tbs lemon juice
1/2 tsp minced garlic
1 pinch dry mustard
1/4 tsp salt
1/8 tsp black pepper

Combine the ingredients and marinade the meat whole no less than 30 minutes, longer if you refrigerate it or want a stronger taste. For soups and stews, cube the meat and cook in a skillet at a temperature that is hot enough to cook the meat quickly on the outside but not burn the marinade. Add more marinade as you cook if you like. The marinade will reduce to a nice glaze and coat the meat.

If you don't use the meat in a soup or stew just prepare it as you normally do. The marinade is going to give it a definite flavor. The flavor will be stronger if the meat is served singularly so as you are making the marinade, adjust it to your taste if it gets too strong.

It gives the meat a sort of barbecue sauce effect. In the soup or stew the flavors infuse and dilute a bit but it still has the effect of giving the dish that barbecue effect. If the Bourbon marinade seems a little risky, try a little on something else first to see if you like it or want to adjust it.

Enjoy!!

Stu
03-28-2010, 23:18
I use a marinade similar to Dan's. Bourbon, worchestershire sauce, soy sauce, brown sugar, onions, garlic, & tobasco. Sorry I don't measure, but go by smell and taste. I put the meat and sauce in a large ziplock, squeeze out every bit of air, and let it sit in the fridge for at least three days (usually a week) in a cake pan, turning the bag daily. Our staple meat is deer meat (in Arkansas if you say venison, you're being snooty). A few weeks ago my wife found a package about 5 years old. It made a great chili stew. If you don't have a frost free freezer you won't have as much problem with freezer burn. Take any freezer burned meat that you cut off and micro wave it and your dog will think he went to heaven. You can actually buy venison? Where are you located?

tmas
03-29-2010, 12:30
Thanks for all the input folks! I am definitely going to use a bourbon marinade. They both sound real good. If I decide to cook it in the Weber as a roast, I'll go with the long marinade, and with Dan's brew if I do a stew type thing. Anyway, I plan to try both methods in the future as I've decided start cooking more venison and also bison in the future.

I live in NYC Stu. Deer meat (always referred to as "venison" here, you know, sounds fancier brings in more $ ) is pretty readily available as a frozen item. Tom

callmeox
03-29-2010, 15:43
Stu, do I need to add "cow meat" and "pig meat" to my vocabulary in the event I am ever invited to dinner in Arkansas? I don't want to be seen as snooty by my hosts.
:lol:

Dramiel McHinson
03-29-2010, 19:41
I use a marinade similar to Dan's. Bourbon, worchestershire sauce, soy sauce, brown sugar, onions, garlic, & tobasco. Sorry I don't measure, but go by smell and taste.

Dang it Stu!! When I read your post I drooled all over my keyboard and shorted it out. :grin: Thank goodness I had a spare...I remember if you met an Arkansas hunter or fisherman you met a fine cook too.

I lived in Arkansas in the early 70's and spent every spare minute hunting and fishing. Arkansas was a sportsman's paradise back then. I hope it hasn't changed.

I'm trying your version next.

Stu
03-30-2010, 12:21
Scott,

You can say beef or pork anywhere, and at my house you can say venison if you want.
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Dan,

I'm going to bring some deer jerky to the sampler. If there's any left I"ll take it Houston. I think it's the best batch I ever made, but WARNING I make it plenty spicy (some people say hot). Yes, Arkansas is still a sportsman's paradise. I can kill deer off my back deck, get bass and perch form several ponds on my place, get trout from the Spring river (about 4 miles as the crow flies, an occasional wild turkey (guess what my drink of choice is with that), plenty of squirrel, rabbit, groundhog, and other small game. The only thing that's bad is the quail population is practically all gone. I'm a pretty fair outdoors chef, my wife is a gourmet cook. If you return to AR for a visit someday, let me know. I live in a dry county but I've got one of the best bars in the state (IMO).
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Tom,

I was on a cruise once where they were serving New Zealand venison. Is that the kind they sell in NYC? I didn't eat any on the cruise, because to us that's like a McDonald's to a city dweller. I know it's illegal to sell wild meat in Arkansas, Texas, or most other states I've lived in. I think the Brits and Germans sell it as well.

tmas
03-30-2010, 23:53
Scott,


Tom,

I was on a cruise once where they were serving New Zealand venison. Is that the kind they sell in NYC? I didn't eat any on the cruise, because to us that's like a McDonald's to a city dweller. I know it's illegal to sell wild meat in Arkansas, Texas, or most other states I've lived in. I think the Brits and Germans sell it as well.


Having thought about it Stu, I think I purchased my piece of flank from a butcher here in Queens NY by the name of Ottomanelli's. They sell all kinds of game meat and out of the ordinary poultry. Don't know if my venison is wild but I'm sure it's not New Zealand. It's not glossily packed with fancy labeling, looks kind of low tech, and Ottomanelli's has a very good rep.

Halifax
04-03-2010, 09:56
If the meat is 5+ years I would probably chunk it. At this point, in terms of flavor, the meat may be best used ground in chili, stews, burgers.

Next time you get a nice cut of deer meat (backstrap) try soaking it in milk for 3 days. Remove from milk and pat dry. Coat with olive oil. Put a rub of sea salt, pepper, onion powder, minced garlic, paprika and rosemary onto the meat. Sear on grill using high heat, and then slow cook to medium. Thin slice like a London Broil. Deeeeelish!