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cowdery
04-06-2010, 00:32
Perhaps someone here more worldly than myself can answer this.

You will see it written that in Scotland, 'whisky' means blended scotch and 'malt' means single malt. Predictably, they never call it scotch.

Is this really true?

It seems more likely to me that 'whisky' would mean Scottish whiskey of any kind, blend or malt, while 'malt' would only mean malt.

Who knows from personal experience?

OscarV
04-06-2010, 11:47
It seems to me that I have never heard a person from Scotland, Ireland or England ever refer to scotch as scotch, they always just call it whiskey.

JohnHansell
04-06-2010, 11:48
Chuck, from my experience, "whisky" is generically used for any Scotch whisky. "Malt whisky" would refer specifically to single malt scotch.

Ultra
04-06-2010, 11:59
Chuck, from my experience, "whisky" is generically used for any Scotch whisky. "Malt whisky" would refer specifically to single malt scotch.

That was how I understood it but I know I am not the expert on this matter.

MarkEdwards
04-06-2010, 15:25
Chuck, from my experience, "whisky" is generically used for any Scotch whisky. "Malt whisky" would refer specifically to single malt scotch.

From MY experience, Scotch whisky is generically referred to as "dammit, got to take out another loan to buy a bottle of the stuff".:cool:

craigthom
04-06-2010, 16:30
Chuck, from my experience, "whisky" is generically used for any Scotch whisky. "Malt whisky" would refer specifically to single malt scotch.

That's what I heard in Scotland, too. I haven't spent a lot of time there, but I made use of what I had.

Here's a tip: if you are traveling with someone who isn't a big whiskey fan, you can say, "hey, how would you like to visit the Walker's shortbread factory? They have an outlet store!"

Walker's is in Aberlour, right on the Spey.

TomH
04-06-2010, 16:40
Mark,

In the past, this was definitely the case, in fact value was what attracted this 30 year scotch drinker to bourbon. However, I'm finding this difference quickly disappearing as most of the new bourbon releases fall consistantly in the $75-100 price range which is where some of the recent scotch releases that I have wanted also fell. This reality really hit home to me recently when I paid a significantly higher price for the ORVW 23 than for Laphroiag 30. I didn't realize it until I started writing this, but in the past 3 months I've purchased significantly more scotch than bourbon as I've been finding better value and more unique releases with scotch for the first time in over 5 years.

Obviously this only applies if one is looking at BTAC, Mariage, Parker's Hertitage, etc. This is no comparison is value on the lower price scale product.

Tom




From MY experience, Scotch whisky is generically referred to as "dammit, got to take out another loan to buy a bottle of the stuff".:cool:

cowdery
04-07-2010, 11:10
Chuck, from my experience, "whisky" is generically used for any Scotch whisky. "Malt whisky" would refer specifically to single malt scotch.

See, that's what I thought. I've never heard anyone say "whisky" and mean it to exclude malts.

I have, however, to my constant irritation, heard people say "whisky" and mean it to exclude all non-Scottish whisky. As I am often asked (I'm sure you are too), "what's the difference between bourbon and whisky?"

ILLfarmboy
04-07-2010, 14:12
As I am often asked (I'm sure you are too), "what's the difference between bourbon and whisky?"

I always explain it this way: Bourbon and scotch are types of whiskey, just like Coke and Dr. Pepper are both sodas.

ErichPryde
04-07-2010, 18:07
I always explain it this way: Bourbon and scotch are types of whiskey, just like Coke and Dr. Pepper are both sodas.

I've used that analogy. the other one I've used is the car company analogy many times.

Gillman
04-08-2010, 19:42
Chuck, I agree that "whisky" internationally is used loosely, or was, to exclude non-Scots whisky. The reason is, to quote a favourite book, the "in-bred preference of the Briton for Scotch whisky". To them, and around the world where the British had influence, whisky WAS Scots, period. All the rest was either Irish whiskey, bourbon, "sour mash", Canadian Club or similar. This is changing now but the older generation in England still view whisky in this way. Whisky and water means any Scotch - blended or straight malt, and other drinks just don't rate under that descriptor.

Gary