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DeanSheen
04-10-2010, 12:10
Amrut has hit the states.

I received notice today that it is available in NYC. They have the Peated CS Single Malt, Fusion, and regular Single Malt versions.

Dramiel McHinson
04-10-2010, 18:38
Amrut has hit the states.

I received notice today that it is available in NYC. They have the Peated CS Single Malt, Fusion, and regular Single Malt versions.

Tell us more. Inquiring palates want to know:drink:

silverfish
04-10-2010, 18:56
Here's a Luxist piece (http://www.luxist.com/2010/02/25/indian-whisky-amrut-hits-u-s-stores-in-march/) from Feb 25th.

"Just prior to its U.S. entry, noted whisky writer Jim Murray
rated Amrut Fusion "third best whisky in the world in his 2010
"Whisky Bible," (http://www.amazon.com/Jim-Murrays-Whisky-Bible-2010/dp/0955472946/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1266947280&sr=8-1) rating it 97. The rating stunned the whisky
establishment, especially in Scotland.

Prices range from $45.00 for the Single-Malt to $72.00
for the Peated Cask Strength.

Amrut's distributor says the initial foray will be New York,
New Jersey, Illinois and Connecticut and Massachusetts.
Park Ave. Liquor and Astor Wines & Spirits are among the
retailers taking pre-orders. In Boston, it's Federal Wine &
Spirits. In Chicago, it's Binny's. The initial shipment will be
900 cases. But by the end of the year, Amrut expects to
have 3000 cases circulating. It will go into Florida, Texas
and California by year-end."

John Hansell (http://www.whatdoesjohnknow.com/2010/03/29/amrut-launches-in-the-u-s/) mentioned them on March 29th.

Amrut website (http://amrutdistilleries.com/asm.asp) lists the Single Malt variants.

Dramiel McHinson
04-10-2010, 19:02
One of the highest rated whiskys for the same price as some of the mid shelf scotches is one of those bang for the buck bottles you just gotta have. I'm on my way to Florida.......

StraightBoston
04-11-2010, 18:50
I was fortunate to finish off a private-label bottling of the Amrut single malt at cask strength at a bar in Tokyo last week. I'm not a Scotch drinker, and I was very impressed. I'll hunt down the Fusion at Julio's when it comes out.

unclebunk
04-11-2010, 19:59
I'll be checking with Binny's here in Chicago tomorrow. It's kind of hard for me to get my head around the notion of great whisky coming from India, but after all that I've read I can't wait to pick up a bottle.

cowdery
04-11-2010, 20:58
I've heard good things about Amrut but haven't had a chance to try it.

DeanSheen
04-12-2010, 08:51
Sorry,

I found it at Astor Wines in NYC.

(I am in no way affiliated with this retailer, simply posting the location as a public service.)

BigRich
04-13-2010, 08:26
I tried most of them at last year's WFNYC and the Fusion stood head and shoulders above the other offerings.

Gillman
02-19-2011, 17:48
I bought the Fusion here, it is very good and I like the proof. Big biscuity and Islay-like flavours.

Gary

Megawatt
02-20-2011, 20:05
I opened my bottle of Amrut Fusion tonight. I found it somewhat floral, quite sweet, with a decent hit of peat. Good complexity and a very nice finish. I look forward to getting better acquainted with this one.

JamesW
02-21-2011, 08:51
I bought the Fusion here, it is very good and I like the proof. Big biscuity and Islay-like flavours.

Gary

Same here. But I think I like the peated slightly better.

Megawatt
02-21-2011, 16:04
Same here. But I think I like the peated slightly better.

Already discontinued, I'm afraid.

JamesW
02-21-2011, 18:05
Already discontinued, I'm afraid.

:(


....................................

Megawatt
02-21-2011, 18:35
On the topic of Indian whisky, the LCBO has brought in Desert Queen, an Indian blend, bottled at some weird proof like 42.5%. It seems most Indian blends are bottled at such a strength. It is only $24.95, I believe.

I'm curious but a bit wary because I've heard that Indian blends can be little more than imported Scotch mixed with industrial alcohol. I'm also not sure about their aging policies. Still, I'm curious to try it.

Gillman
02-21-2011, 18:55
Well, I can help. :)

I bought it to conduct an experiment, which was to blend grain spirit with malt whiskies, about 50/50. In the 1800's, in Scotland as well as here, grain spirit, i.e., un-aged, was used to blend with straight or single whiskies, and the practice carries on in the States for American (blended) whisky. I wanted to use real grain spirit though, not vodka as such. In British countries or those under that tradition, grain spirit, which in time can become grain whisky, can have some taste and be less neutral than vodka. The Desert Queen bottle states it uses grain spirit and malt whisky, proportions not disclosed. So I bought it and tried it of course on its own. Can't say it's a favourite. Quite bland with some whisky flavour, and I think I got some caramel flavor too. Then too it is not that expensive, so fair enough. However, mixed 50/50 with a mix of malts (my own again) I thought it made an excellent lighter Scotch.

Gary

Megawatt
02-21-2011, 19:02
Well, I can help. :)

I bought it to conduct an experiment, which was to blend grain spirit (GNS basically) with malt whiskies, about 50/50. In the 1800's, in Scotland as well as here, neutral spirit was used to blend with straight or single whiskies, and the practice carries on in the States for American (blended) whisky. I wanted to use real grain spirit though, not vodka as such. In British countries or those under that tradition, grain whisky can have some taste and be less neutral than vodka. So I bought it and tried it of course on its own. Can't say it's a favourite. Quite bland with some whisky flavour, somewhat caramel-flavoured too. Then too it is not that expensive, so fair enough. However mixed 50/50 with a mix of malts (my own again) I thought it made an excellent lighter Scotch.

Gary

You are talking about Desert Queen? I thought it contained malt as well as grain. At least the distiller's description would lead one to believe it does. But maybe I should avoid going out of my way to buy a cheap blend.

Gillman
02-22-2011, 04:16
Right, it appears to be a combination of grain whisky and malt whisky, but how much of each is not stated, and I assumed the malt whisky component is low, from the taste and price. I wanted a whisky where I could increase the malt part, in other words. I mixed it 50/50 with a mix of malts I had. So if the Indian whisky had 20% malt say (just throwing out a number), the blend ended up 70% malt, 30% grain whisky. If it had 10%, then my blend was 60% malt.

Just making a richer blend basically. But to buy something to drink as is as most would, I'd take any Scotch blend on the market over the Desert Queen, any difference in price is worth it IMO.

Gary

Megawatt
02-22-2011, 10:19
Right, it appears to be a combination of grain whisky and malt whisky, but how much of each is not stated, and I assumed the malt whisky component is low, from the taste and price. I wanted a whisky where I could increase the malt part, in other words. I mixed it 50/50 with a mix of malts I had. So if the Indian whisky had 20% malt say (just throwing out a number), the blend ended up 70% malt, 30% grain whisky. If it had 10%, then my blend was 60% malt.

Just making a richer blend basically. But to buy something to drink as is as most would, I'd take any Scotch blend on the market over the Desert Queen, any difference in price is worth it IMO.

Gary

In that case, I will definitely skip Desert Queen.

silverfish
02-24-2011, 05:25
Amrut Fusion is awarded Malt Advocate's World Whisky of the Year (http://www.whatdoesjohnknow.com/2011/02/23/malt-advocate-whisky-awards-world-whisky-of-the-year-amrut-fusion/).

cowdery
02-24-2011, 22:59
I assume that Canada's laws are similar to ours and the EU's, so that the many 'whiskies' sold in India that have a sugar cane base cannot be imported into our countries as whisky. If it's labeled as whisky it must have a grain base. However, just like the least expensive scotch blends, the malt whisky component is likely very small.

Gillman
02-26-2011, 00:55
I agree and it tastes like a Scotch-style blend, but the malt whisky component is, judging by the taste, not large.

Gary

cowdery
02-27-2011, 16:16
I've only had it at WhiskeyFest. I found it quite pleasant, better than I expected, but very superficial, almost a scotch-by-the-numbers. It might hit the sweet spot for some people but it didn't for me.

StraightNoChaser
02-28-2011, 08:07
Anyone else a little apprehensive about drinking anything that was made in India? Not that this stems from any sort of racist sensitivity... It has just always been my impression that India is a very, very dirty and unhygienic culture/country. Pictures of dead bodies floating in the Ganges river probably did that one in for me.

unclebunk
02-28-2011, 08:45
After reading many decent reviews, I picked up a bottle of the Amrut Single Malt Whisky and was largely unimpressed. I guess I should have spent a bit more and gotten the Fusion which seems to get more favorable reviews. I'm just having trouble dropping $60 for it when I can buy many premium quality single malts for that price.

MikeK
02-28-2011, 10:52
I tried the Fusion at a tasting this weekend. I was excited to try it from much high praise I had read. I found it fine, completely acceptable, nothing wrong with it, but nothing special either.

cowdery
02-28-2011, 11:02
Anyone else a little apprehensive about drinking anything that was made in India? Not that this stems from any sort of racist sensitivity... It has just always been my impression that India is a very, very dirty and unhygienic culture/country. Pictures of dead bodies floating in the Ganges river probably did that one in for me.

Probably more stereotype than fair, especially with regard to commercial products, but you have very little to worry about -- hygiene-wise anyway -- when a product is 40% alcohol.

macdeffe
06-25-2011, 12:55
Apart from their standard range, peated and unpeated at 46% and cask strength + the fusion, this magnificient distillery have released several quite clever and very innovative bottlings. They have so far avoided the "wine finish trap", but has used alternative casks and cask movements I personally find more suiting for whisky :-)

I do like the tropical full bodied texture of Amrut and I think it's delightful that good quality whisky can emerge from the least expected places. Another one to look out for in the same catagory is Taiwan's Kavalan

Blackadder has released several Amruts as well

Their Special Bottlings so far are

Two Continent, matured in two continents and is their most scottish like whisky

Double Caskl, a mix of their two oldest cask, around 6-7 years old

Kadhambam, it means mixture in Tamil and is the result of Amrut being matured on three different cask types- Ex-oloroso, ex-Bangalore Blue Brandy casks and finally ex-rum casks, the latter two cask types has been used for Amruts own brandy and rum products

Intermediate Sherry, It's Amrut whisky that has been transfered from ex-bourbon casks to ex-sherry casks and then back to ex-bourbon. Bottled at 50%

Amrut 100, peated Amrut matured in 100l casks, bottled at 100cl and at 100proof british strength (57.1%)

The only bottle I havent cracked open yet is the 100, but I really liked the other, the two continents being my least favourite, it tasted like a scottish single malt and lacked the delicious full bodies juicy tropical texture I really like in Amruts

Steffen

Megawatt
06-26-2011, 18:57
Lucky guy to try all those Amruts.

I'm not going to say that Fusion is the best stuff I've had but neither is it run-of-the-mill malt whisky. As soon as I put my nose up to the bottle I can tell it is different. In fact I can't even think of anything to compare it to.

macdeffe
07-07-2011, 12:29
I got this press release last week :


Vogage of discovery for Amrut Herald
Amrut Distilleries is once again pushing back boundaries in the whisky world. For its latest offering it has
chosen a beautiful, but remote, island as the place to mature four barrels of its Bangalore-distilled single
malt whisky. For a project like this, one might have expected Amrut to pick an island in the whisky
heartlands, but the Indian distillery has once again opted for the unconventional and chosen an island 45
miles off the north German coast.
Helgoland is an unspoiled unique environment with dramatic red sandstone cliffs and sensuous sand
dunes. Not only is it free of traffic and low in pollution, but it also enjoys a gentle climate thanks to the
Gulf Stream which allows exotic plants and wildlife to thrive at its relatively high latitude.
From Bangalore, itself known as India’s “garden city” due to its lush tropical environment, the casks of
malt whisky were shipped to Germany before being transferred to a boat for the two-and-a-half-hour
crossing from Cuxhaven to the northern island idyll.
There, Amrut’s German importer, Prineus, had arranged for the barrels of the malt to mature further. Not
only was the Helgoland climate a big contrast to tropical India, but the barrels were stored close to sea
level. In Bangalore the Amrut distillery is at an altitude of 3,000 feet. The outcome is the stunning new
Amrut Herald.
Keeping in tune with the pure unspoilt atmosphere of Helgoland, the whisky was bottled in as simple a
way as possible. It was not filtered or diluted and in fact you will notice sediments in the hand-filled
bottles.
This is the first time that any whisky has been matured and bottled on Helgoland and the bottles from
one of the casks will be retained on the island, which is a duty free haven. Like Amrut’s previous limited
edition malts, Amrut Herald will only be available in small quantities in certain locations and it is sure to
become a popular bottling.
Gerd Schmerschneider of Prineus is delighted with the collaboration. “The result is a fantastic whisky,
one of the finest examples you can get out of a Bourbon cask. It is clean, powerful and holds loads of
vanilla and sweetness. It was a great honour for me, on behalf of Prineus, to work with Amrut. Neither
maturation nor bottling of whisky has been done on the island of Helgoland before, but millions of litres of
alcohol have been sold there. The environment is perfect for maturing whisky as it is 70km away from
the mainland, no pollution is evident and cars aren’t allowed on the island.”
“Making this malt whisky was a real adventure,” said Ashok Chokalingam of Amrut Distilleries. “It
travelled 5,000 miles to the edge of mainland Europe. Then we were able to mature and bottle whisky on
Helgoland, for the first time in the island’s history. And in Amrut Herald we have created another unique
malt whisky which will satisfy the connoisseurs who have come to expect the best from us

I am a big Amrut fan and for those of you not familiar with their previous release Two Continents and Amrut in general, I can assure you that this alternative maturation location has a huge impact on the whisky

But I guess you would know as Kentucky Bourbon is heavily influenced by being matured in the Kentucky climate

Steffen

chperry
09-05-2011, 17:06
I tried the Amrut Single Malt Whisky Cask Strength yesterday. It came in a 50ml bottle at 61.8% alc/vol. I cut it with a little water (5 to 10ml) and found it to be very enjoyable. Good enough that I will likely spring for a full 750ml bottle on my next visit to the liquor store. I am no good for tasting notes. I only know what I like and what I don't like. And I liked this.

Charles