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boone
08-01-2010, 15:33
This issue comes up from time to time.

http://www.lcni5.com/cgi-bin/c2.cgi?091+article+News+20100731103236091091007

Yeah, there's black everywhere...

I live 12 miles from the distilleres/warehouses. There's black mold here. I don't think the black mold here is caused from warehouses miles away. I think it's a natural thing like the moss that grows on the front side...the green mold on the rocks down by the creek...Angel share intensify the growth but I think it's there no matter what you do.

What are they supposed to do? Shut down the warehouses and be gone with everthing?

Stuck between a rock and a hard place...I'm curious to see what's going to happen.

PaulO
08-01-2010, 15:59
I wouldn't be surprized if increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and warmer than normal temperatures are increasing the fungus growth. These same coditions have made poison ivy grow faster and produce more volitile oil. I feel bad for the people suffering from alergies. I don't blame the distillers for something that occurs normally in nature.
I heard by the Makers Mark distillery they have red stuff dribbling down over everything. :lol:

BBQ+Bourbon
08-01-2010, 16:29
Help me out here. When bourbon pushes the angels share through the barrel, it's primarily releasing water and alcohol, right? Mold flourishes in a damp environment, but there must be other environmental factors. Given the volume of atmosphere between the home in question and the rickhouses, could it really affect the humidity at that home? Is the humidity of this home significantly higher than that a few miles away?

My home is dozens of miles from any distillery and mold shows up on my siding every couple years. Perhaps I should knock on McCormick's door and ask what gives.

Josh
08-01-2010, 16:32
This issue comes up from time to time.

http://www.lcni5.com/cgi-bin/c2.cgi?091+article+News+20100731103236091091007

What are they supposed to do? Shut down the warehouses and be gone with everthing?

Stuck between a rock and a hard place...I'm curious to see what's going to happen.


I feel bad for the people suffering from alergies. I don't blame the distillers for something that occurs normally in nature.
I heard by the Makers Mark distillery they have red stuff dribbling down over everything. :lol:

I suffer from some occasionally severe allegies and asthma, so I know how horrifying it can be to not be able to breathe or how miserable it can be to be sniffling and sneezing all summer. It should be said that in the past few years I have been down to Kentucky and been around the distilleries a lot and I have never noticed any worsening of my allergies. Unless there is any evidence that it is harmful, not just annoying, they need to either live with the fungus or move. A distillery's been there for well over 100 years, one would think if it was all that harmful, it would have manifested itself by now. The whole thing reminds me of the completely made up hysteria around power lines a few years ago.

I think the fact that the guy moved there after retiring speaks volumes too. I don't want to get too controversial in the bourbon sub-forum, so I'll leave it there.

Oh and Paul's comment about Maker's :slappin:

Res/st-or
08-01-2010, 16:42
Humidity is definitely a factor, and it is always extremely humid this time of the year in the south and midwest. However, if they were releasing water vapor in quantity, it may sink particularly in the morning before sunrise as fog. All kinds of freaky molds and moses can accelerate in those conditions.

Rughi
08-01-2010, 16:44
Earlier this year I was at a 'meet the master distiller' event which had Ian MacMillan of Burn Stewart Scotch distilleries. He talked about the black mold being common at Scottish distilleries, but didn't seem to know it happened elsewhere as well.

Roger

PaulO
08-02-2010, 08:10
I saw a tv commercial recently advertizing a local business that cleans off black stuff like this growing on people's roofs. I have myself seen some buildings with the dark stains. It sounds like the same or similar fungus. The closest distilleries to us are about 100 miles away.

p_elliott
08-02-2010, 08:28
I have been to KY and seen this mold growing on peoples houses around the distilleries. I wonder what would it cost the distillery to hire a team to go around and clean these houses on a regular basis. Say they hit each house once or twice a year that were with in so much distance of the distance of the warehouses.

sailor22
08-02-2010, 13:16
Is it possible the recent flooding may have contributed to a higher than average breakout of mold. mildew and fungi in KY?

Did any water from the flooding get into the lower floors of any barrel houses - particularly some of the ones next to the river?

cowdery
08-02-2010, 14:44
The definition of "news" is what's news to you.

There's nothing new here, except that a few people are discovering this stuff for the first time and a couple of them are overreacting. I see no evidence to suggest that anything has changed or is more severe now than in the past.

Kentucky's whiskey warehouses are significantly fuller now than they have been at any time in recent history, which could mean there's a little more mold now or that a couple of buildings that weren't affected a few years ago are now.

Tom Moore is one of the few warehouse campuses that is close to a densely populated residential area. If somebody is complaining about mold on their garage, they probably live close to Tom Moore.

When Barton owned it crews from the distillery would come around and clean it off for free sometimes, though that wasn't a formal or necessarily all-the-time thing.

Some distilleries clean it off their own buildings, most don't bother. Some (Wild Turkey, Maker's Mark) just build dark-colored warehouses so it doesn't show. It covers the bark of most trees that are near warehouses and it doesn't hurt them. It has been known for as long as people have been barrel-aging large quantities of distilled spirits, which is about 150 years.

OscarV
08-02-2010, 15:02
It covers the bark of most trees that are near warehouses and it doesn't hurt them.

That's good to know. If it were to hurt vegitation then a farmer's complaint might carry more clout.
I wonder if Real Estate agents point this out when selling a home close to a distillery?

Rughi
08-02-2010, 15:05
http://www.lcni5.com/cgi-bin/c2.cgi?091+article+News+20100731103236091091007

Does this link load for others? I've tried 5 times at different times of day without success. I can infer the gist, but would like to read the link.

Roger

smokinjoe
08-02-2010, 15:05
Here's a discussion about it from a couple of years ago.
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5680&highlight=mold+barton.

cowdery
08-02-2010, 17:13
Does this link load for others? I've tried 5 times at different times of day without success. I can infer the gist, but would like to read the link.

Roger

It works for me. You can try navigating to The Kentucky Standard on your own. The story isn't dated but I'm sure it's recent.

Bourbon Boiler
08-02-2010, 17:28
Does this link load for others? I've tried 5 times at different times of day without success. I can infer the gist, but would like to read the link.

Roger

Try

http://www.kystandard.com/

As of 7:30 Eastern, it is the third story.

Bourbon Boiler
08-02-2010, 17:40
I saw a tv commercial recently advertizing a local business that cleans off black stuff like this growing on people's roofs. I have myself seen some buildings with the dark stains. It sounds like the same or similar fungus. The closest distilleries to us are about 100 miles away.

I'm no expert, but I don't think this is the same. I've seen what you are describing in my neighborhood regularly. That particular particulate will die when exposed to very minute amounts of zinc. Sometimes there will be streaks on a roof from the chimney. It looks like the streak is a part of the house that had faded, however, that streak is the original color. It is the rest of the roof that has darkened with this mold. The line is where a galvanized steel cover has had water slash off of it, collect very small amounts of zinc-oxide (aka white rust), and thus kill/prevent the mold growth.

Many types of shingles are made with traces of ZnO to avoid this very problem. Sprays are made as well to get zinc componds to adhere to a surface to avoid the mold coming back, and are pretty effective.

While I am certainly no biologist, I would guess if these organisms are that similar, it would be a lot easier for the distillierys' neighbors to control. The distilleries themselves might struggle due to the shear magnitude, but I would think it would be containable within a mile or two.

I'm extrapolating this hypothesis from a number of subjects I know just a little about, so I may be 180 degrees from reality here. If anyone has any experience with the cleaning iteself and knows what compunds are used it might help our collective understanding.

callmeox
08-02-2010, 17:43
Quick story:

A woman lives adjacent to the Four Roses Cox's creek facility and has complained yearly about the black mold problem on her white house.

Her solution?

Sell that house to a relative and build another white house on the same property.

cowdery
08-02-2010, 18:42
Quick story:

A woman lives adjacent to the Four Roses Cox's creek facility and has complained yearly about the black mold problem on her white house.

Her solution?

Sell that house to a relative and build another white house on the same property.

Probably the same person who complains that they should move the deer crossing sign further away from her driveway because she doesn't want them crossing there.

callmeox
08-02-2010, 19:04
Probably the same person who complains that they should move the deer crossing sign further away from her driveway because she doesn't want them crossing there.

http://img242.imageshack.us/img242/6232/rimshot.jpg


http://i394.photobucket.com/albums/pp30/BaronVonStevie/rimshot.jpg

cowdery
08-03-2010, 09:18
Thank you. I'm here all week. Try the veal.

pepcycle
08-03-2010, 12:26
Its not a mold, its a fungus.
Fungus has a tendency to be opportunistic. Lives where nothing else will, so the alcohol may prevent other stuff from growing and having some defense mechanism that is alcohol stimulated.

Check out this reference

http://individual.utoronto.ca/jscott/projects/baudoinia/Microbe-March_2009.pdf

fishnbowljoe
08-03-2010, 15:36
Thank you. I'm here all week. Try the veal.

Now that's funny! :slappin: Joe