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View Full Version : So.. someone is not to fond of CDN Whisky



imbibehour
08-11-2010, 19:54
Spirits columnist from the Post wrote a pretty funny review and thoughts...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/09/AR2010080905417.html

Rughi
08-11-2010, 20:43
I think I'm in lockstep with the author of that article. And, Caribou Crossing is pretty well done for what it is. It was tasting it with the group, and our generally favorable comments that got me to thinking about what a really great blended whiskey for this niche might be in. Of course, in my example it's a Blended American Whiskey, but you get the point.

"What would a Great Blended American Whiskey be? thread here (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?p=214581#post214581). Let's hear your thoughts.

Roger

ILLfarmboy
08-11-2010, 21:18
This part made me smile.



"VO really didn't taste like much at all, did it?" she said. "Well, I guess it was perfect for a young girl who'd never had anything to drink before."


Like the author, I too grew up in the 70's, well more like the late 70's and 80's, and I too remember a lot of adults drinking Canadian blends, often while they played pitch or 500 at CB get-togethers. Reading that article reminded me of my childhood.

harshest
08-12-2010, 06:00
I could only think of my *cough*highschool*cough* days and early college career and all the 7 and 7 I have consumed, that stuff sure went own easy. Living in Michigan the Canadian whiskey has a pretty strong hold.

I always liked seeing the Black Velvet billboards all over the place with the hot blond in long black dress.

Bourbon Boiler
08-12-2010, 17:09
Canadian Whisky was my gateway to Bourbon. My drink of choice for a few years was Canadian Club on the rocks. I went from ordering with rocks and a splash of water, to rocks with a few drops of water, to just rocks, to neat, and then to bourbon.

I don't know that I would have acquired a bourbon or scotch taste without drinking the Canadian stuff first. Of course, I might have saved some money that way ...

cowdery
08-12-2010, 20:20
Canadian Whisky was my gateway to Bourbon. My drink of choice for a few years was Canadian Club on the rocks. I went from ordering with rocks and a splash of water, to rocks with a few drops of water, to just rocks, to neat, and then to bourbon.

I don't know that I would have acquired a bourbon or scotch taste without drinking the Canadian stuff first. Of course, I might have saved some money that way ...

So what you're saying is that once you discovered what the Canadian Club really tasted like, you switched to bourbon. :)

dmarkle
08-12-2010, 20:52
The last time I had canadian whisky was this past year, when my beloved Washington Capitals lost so early and so ignominiously in the Stanley Cup playoffs.

I am a fervent believer in matching a whisky with an occasion, so I decided upon a spirit which would make me feel even more miserable, and cement the entire experience in my existence upon this planet as a lifetime low -- that way, I would feel that there was nowhere, not with life, not with sport, not with whisky -- to go but up.

I drank Seagrams 7. Straight. What little taste it had was nasty and artificial, almost like someone took some vanilla extract and caramel color and mixed it in with some low-grade vodka and slapped a label on it that said "whisky".

No offense, Canadians, but until you learn how to make a quality whisky, you shall forever be "america's hat (http://www.dailyhaha.com/_pics/canada_americas_hat.htm)."

matthew0715
08-12-2010, 22:47
FYI, and many of you already know this, but I want to point it out: Seagram's 7 Crown is American blended whiskey. VO and VO Gold are the two Canadian whiskys bearing the Seagram's brand name. Whether they taste significantly better or worse than Seagram's 7 is unknown to me.

dmarkle
08-13-2010, 06:11
FYI, and many of you already know this, but I want to point it out: Seagram's 7 Crown is American blended whiskey.

Thanks for the correction! This is why I love this board -- it's been a real learning experience. Now if I can just keep from putting my foot in my mouth! :banghead:

(I still don't like regular Crown, though. And Canada still is America's Hat) :grin:

sailor22
08-13-2010, 06:24
I have never thought Canadian was bad whiskey, some like Crown's Cask 16 and XR are good pours.... if overpriced.

I suppose when you drink for effect and don't want flavors getting in the way it is second only to Vodka. Obviously that's a huge market.

imbibehour
08-13-2010, 09:35
These are some great stories and opinions. I was beginning to wonder also if the columnist was from Canada originally but he probably isn't. I thought his comment refering it as "brown vodka" was pretty funny.

I was uh.. not to happy when the Caps bowed out last year also... :smiley_acbt:

harshest
08-13-2010, 10:42
I also forgot to mention that my grandpa who is in his late 70's would always order a "CC and Water" before dinner whenever we went out to eat. Now that I think about it, that explains the coughing when I gave him a sip of my EC12 straight.

Jono
08-13-2010, 12:20
In my experience, they were almost always used as a base whisky for mixed drinks because they were relatively cheap. The Crown Royal SR, XR whiskys seem to offer better Canadian straight pours. CC Classic and Alberta Springs are ok. Wiser's has its fans, but it failed to wow me. I have not tried Gibson's, Forty Creek or Pendletons.

I think a "straight Canadian whisky" with real depth of flavor, aging and higher proof could be a big seller. I would love to see a "real rye" Canadian (at least 51%)

Gillman
08-13-2010, 12:33
Try Wiser's Legacy, which contains a significant portion of batch rye whisky (whisky distilled at a low proof). Of all the brands we have discussed over the years, this is the one, in my opinion, that truly will open eyes as to what Canadian at its best can be. Whistle Pig no doubt is similar, but I haven't had a chance to try that as yet. Legacy has a big spearmint-like note with a good body and attack. It is no shrinking violet and it isn't "smooth", thanks be. This is a new product but should I imagine be available soon in large U.S. outlets, or perhaps is now.

That said, I still like many traditional Canadian whiskies, Crown Royal Special Reserve in particular and some in the 40 Creek line. Canadian whisky is different, not inferior to U.S. straight whiskey.

Gary

DeanSheen
08-13-2010, 14:46
"Canadian whisky is different, not inferior to U.S. straight whiskey."

Spoken like a true Canadian! Gary, you still have hockey. :)

Gillman
08-13-2010, 15:02
You mean that's it, Robert? :)

Gary

DeanSheen
08-13-2010, 15:15
Well I suppose there are a few pretty girls and some nice restaurants up there too. Ohh and you got the good side of the falls and your banks are well run.

But that's it, I can't give you any more. :-)

Gillman
08-13-2010, 15:23
Can't dispute those but there's a list long as my arm! :) To be discussed in Bardstown soon over a dram (maybe Wiser's Legacy).

Gary

Rughi
08-13-2010, 16:14
Can't dispute those but there's a list long as my arm! :)

Tim Horton's and poutine!
That's the real deal in comfort food.

craigthom
08-13-2010, 16:50
Tim Horton's and poutine!
That's the real deal in comfort food.

You beat me to it!

Gillman
08-13-2010, 17:08
Well, gents, can't disagree of course. Timmy's (as we term it here) is great. Not just the dougnuts and coffee (when fresh which usually it is), but the sandwiches too. Poutine is an interesting food. It was not available in Montreal when I grew up there, but came in from the countryside, and it's interesting to see how big it's gotten. You see it in fancy forms too today, but I like it the original way. Incidentally, the name is from a French word meaning a mess of things, a combination, which derives from the English word, pudding. A Xmas pudding can indeed be a bunch of things mixed together, which is the poutine in Quebec (and now Canada in general).

Gary

cowdery
08-13-2010, 21:02
Just like the early Greeks who navigated the Aegean by sailing from island to island, you can navigate from one end of Canada to the other by following the Timmy's.

Gillman
08-14-2010, 03:55
That's right. They are very numerous, with many concentrated in parts of Toronto and the other big cities, but people never tire of them. They are good quality, inexpensive and convenient. The concept of the modern donut, donut store and franchise were purely American but Canada brought the idea to a high pitch in the form of Tim Horton's. However, the company is now American-owned, which may explain the presence here and there of some American outlets.

Gary

Bourbon Boiler
08-14-2010, 05:49
... when my beloved Washington Capitals lost so early and so ignominiously in the Stanley Cup playoffs.

I am a fervent believer in matching a whisky with an occasion, ...

I can only imagine the amount of alcohol required to reconcile matching a spirit to the occasion and being a Caps fan.

Not that my Pens fared much better last May. :smiley_acbt:

2 more months and we all can hope again.

dmarkle
08-14-2010, 06:02
I can only imagine the amount of alcohol required to reconcile matching a spirit to the occasion and being a Caps fan.

It requires a lot, but like I said, when matched to the occasion it's quite, quite cheap. Let's just say they've never given us the opportunity to match any occasion with my Pappy 20.

So gents, is Crown XR really all that good? What's it like? It's priced insanely here in VA, but I'm hearing rumors around the office of being able to get it in Maryland for somewhere in the $60's.

Megawatt
08-14-2010, 10:19
So what I'm getting out of this thread is:
Tim Horton's coffee is good but Canadian whisky is not. I think we've got things a little backwards somehow. Tim Horton's is okay if there is no alternative.

And for the record, Halak + Cammalleri > Pens + Caps.

Bourbon Boiler
08-14-2010, 11:46
And for the record, Halak + Cammalleri > Pens + Caps.

We'll see what happens as the Carey Price era re-opens soon. But Halak has forever made my hate-list because of last May.

Dr. François
08-14-2010, 16:31
I think a "straight Canadian whisky" with real depth of flavor, aging and higher proof could be a big seller. I would love to see a "real rye" Canadian (at least 51%)

I read that Alberta Springs is 100% Rye. Shows you what a difference high-proof distillation makes!

imbibehour
08-15-2010, 09:39
I read that Alberta Springs is 100% Rye.

yes it is, not sure about the taste though. Alberta Premium is a 5yr, Springs a 10yr I believe.