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wintermute
09-17-2010, 14:51
I've got a stupid question for everyone. Is it acceptable (and more important - tasty) to substitute Angostura for Peychaud's bitters in a Sazerac cocktail? I've had the hankering to make me one, but I just can't find the Peychaud's. Thanks.

sku
09-17-2010, 14:58
I don't think you can call it a proper Sazerac without Peychaud's as that's a fundamental ingredient, but I'm sure it will still be tasty drink. I usually use both Peychaud's and Angostura when I make one.

There are multiple purveyors of Peychaud's on-line if you don't mind waiting for shipping.

cas
09-17-2010, 15:10
I use both as well. I saw that recommended somewhere.

In June I was in New Orleans for a few days so I had a few Sazeracs at a few places recommended (Ye Olde Absinthe bar and the Sazerac Bar at the Roosevelt). I was surprised that both places used Herbsaint instead of Absinthe, and when I asked they indicated that Absinthe would be too strong. I got some nice Sazerac glasses at the Sazerac Bar.

And, btw - they used Old Overholt at Ye Olde Absinthe and Sazerac at the Sazerac.
Craig

sku
09-17-2010, 15:24
I was surprised that both places used Herbsaint instead of Absinthe, and when I asked they indicated that Absinthe would be too strong. I got some nice Sazerac glasses at the Sazerac Bar.

Herbsaint is actually the traditional ingredient in New Orleans. I assume this is because it is local and part of the tradition there. Of course Absinthe was used prior to the ban, and now is being used again, but I'm not at all surprised that NOLA bars are sticking with the local favorite.

cas
09-18-2010, 07:01
Herbsaint is actually the traditional ingredient in New Orleans. I assume this is because it is local and part of the tradition there. Of course Absinthe was used prior to the ban, and now is being used again, but I'm not at all surprised that NOLA bars are sticking with the local favorite.

Yeah, I suspect having used herbsaint for most of the past 100 years or so it's more traditional than Absinthe. But I kinda thought Ye Olde Absinthe Bar might use Absinthe.
Craig

imbibehour
09-18-2010, 19:48
I love making Sazeracs and Peychauds is a must..

Also try to get a hold of Sazerac Rye whiskey made by Buffalo Trace to use also.

As for the Herbsaint stuff... well.... to me... I am not into Absinthe. I have tried a few and it is all the same to me cause licorice/anise to me isn't that varied in the nose between brands, and there isn't much more to detect.

In the Sazerac you toss most of it out anyway and just coat the glass.

If you are an Absinthe fiend then by all means find a good one, or the Herbsaint to use (which I don't think you can get outside of NOLA, I know I can't get it where I live), but my suggestion even just use Pernod in a pinch for it (they make a cheap substitute, and also have their own Absinthe but it is PRICEY!).

Don't forget the lemon twist ;)

Cheers! friggin love a classic Saz!

wintermute
09-19-2010, 12:44
Went out looking for rye and all I could find was Jim Beam and Old Overcoat. I've had Overholt before and wasn't on planning to go down that road again. So I picked up the Beam, which I have to say, isn't bad at all. Absinthe is ridiculously priced so I bought the Pernod. And Pechaud's just isn't available around here, so here's what I did:

Chliled down one old fashioned glass, rinsed it with the Pernod. Teaspoon of sugar and 3 dashes Angostura in the other with a drop of water. Muddled it, Poured in my Beam. Added two cubes and gave it a very quick stir, strained it into the Pernod-rinsed glass, twisted some lemon peel over it. This drink was exquisite. It's an experience, where half of the enjoyment comes from the interaction of the taste and smell. I'm going to have to order some Peychaud's from BT!

imbibehour
09-19-2010, 21:43
Irony of ironies.. :)

I actually was looking for some other obscure cocktail ingredients (don't get me started on Swedish Punsch :( )... but I found a place to buy Herbsaint online today. I hope these guys are good cause if they are there's a bunch of stuff I wouldn't mind getting from them:

http://www.drinkupny.com/

I grabbed some Sazerac rye which is actually made ... by Buffalo Trace :)

Here's how I like to make mine just like this master here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfhaxHYb46E

Gillman
09-20-2010, 08:32
The version described using Beam sounds excellent, and some would say Beam bourbon has a rye-like note, so it fits in well there too. The original recipe is variable, and Angostura never can be wrong; still, Peychaud does give a particular flavor to it.

Gary

AVB
09-21-2010, 16:48
Actually you can get Herbsaint in a number of places. It's on the shelf at my local government monopoly here in PA but way over priced as usual. In DC try the DCWineGuy at 1618 17th Street NW. About $20.


I love making Sazeracs and Peychauds is a must..

If you are an Absinthe fiend then by all means find a good one, or the Herbsaint to use (which I don't think you can get outside of NOLA, I know I can't get it where I live),

imbibehour
09-21-2010, 17:41
Actually you can get Herbsaint in a number of places. It's on the shelf at my local government monopoly here in PA but way over priced as usual. In DC try the DCWineGuy at 1618 17th Street NW. About $20.

I'll have to look in to that, I was at Calvert Woodley and the guy their told me he couldn't get it...

Cheers and Thanks!

cowdery
09-21-2010, 20:42
Both Herbsaint and Peychauds are made by Sazerac at Buffalo Trace. I'm told they really stink up the joint. Of course they also make Sazerac Rye.

The recently-refurbished Sazerac bar is a long time fixture at the Roosevelt. The Sazerac Company doesn't have an interest but they do have a relationship.

Ye Olde Absinthe House is one of my favorite New Orleans bars. It's like a college bar, if you went to college in the 18th century.

cas
09-22-2010, 15:22
Both Herbsaint and Peychauds are made by Sazerac at Buffalo Trace. I'm told they really stink up the joint. Of course they also make Sazerac Rye.

The recently-refurbished Sazerac bar is a long time fixture at the Roosevelt. The Sazerac Company doesn't have an interest but they do have a relationship.

Ye Olde Absinthe House is one of my favorite New Orleans bars. It's like a college bar, if you went to college in the 18th century.

I believe some of the football helmets hanging on the wall are approximately that olde. That dust on them was thick enough to carbon date.

I liked the rocks glasses at the Sazerac bar so I bought a few at the gift shop. As if I needed more glassware.
Craig

cowdery
09-22-2010, 20:39
New Orleans and Quebec City are the only two cities in America where you can effectively pretend you're in Europe. I haven't been in Ye Olde Absinthe House in many years, but my memories are of it being like an 18th century tavern in London or Paris, except for the football helmets of course.

cas
09-24-2010, 16:27
I lived in Baton Rouge and visited NO fairly often during the early 80s, but I don't think I had ever gone into Ye Olde Absinthe House before. It was an interesting contrast with the Sazerac Bar, and a rather different clientele. Both enjoyable but for different reasons. I also spent some time at the back bar in the Bourbon House. The waitress gave me a free bourbon milk punch at the end of the evening.
Craig

TomH
09-24-2010, 16:55
Ye Olde Absinthe House is one of my favorite New Orleans bars. It's like a college bar, if you went to college in the 18th century.

And I had you pegged as an Arnaud's fan.

Tom

StraightNoChaser
05-02-2011, 09:58
I ran out of rye so I've been substituting OWA107 :bigeyes: It's still pretty damn good. Here's my recipe:

1. Chill an old fashioned glass in the freezer for several hours (I love a drink that takes so much premeditation)
2. Drop a sugar cube into an unchilled glass
3. Saturate the sugar cube with 5-6 dashes of Peychaud's
4. Add 2oz of rye (I tend to use Sazerac or Ri)
5. Stir gently
6. Add 1/4oz of Grand Absente (my preferred brand) to your frozen glass and swirl until it is coated with Absente. You can toss the Absente at this point but I prefer to leave it in as I really enjoy it
7. Add your sugar, bitters and whiskey concoction to the chilled glass with Absente, careful to not let the remaining sugar grains fall into your chilled glass (otherwise your drink will be too sweet)
8. Cut a fresh piece of lemon zest and rim the chilled glass with it's oil, finally dropping it into the drink
9. Perfectly. Simply sublime perfection. Love me a damn Sazerac

StraightNoChaser
05-02-2011, 10:00
I have a bottle of VWFR rye... do I dare?

cas
05-02-2011, 10:31
I've been gonna try that too. I used Handy once for a shaker full. Pretty intense. I like this drink cold, so I've taken to pre-chilling the rye/sugar/bitters mixture.
Craig

LikeItWasSodaPop
05-03-2011, 00:06
Using VWFRR in a cocktail would be a huge mistake. I guarantee you won't be able to taste the difference. For what it's worth, I'm actually reading this in the one bar in town that carries VWFRR and the bartender agrees. (I read SB while my cutie is powdering her nose.) Says he won't use VW for mixing, period.

I really don't understand why people even consider using rare/premium shit for mixing. But I'm obviously an absolutist on the topic. Still, I came to be that way listening to smart bartenders. This guy uses Ritt BIB, baby Saz and various Wellers for his unique drinks. One of the classiest "wells" in the city.

StraightNoChaser
05-03-2011, 09:08
Using VWFRR in a cocktail would be a huge mistake. I guarantee you won't be able to taste the difference. For what it's worth, I'm actually reading this in the one bar in town that carries VWFRR and the bartender agrees. (I read SB while my cutie is powdering her nose.) Says he won't use VW for mixing, period.

I really don't understand why people even consider using rare/premium shit for mixing. But I'm obviously an absolutist on the topic. Still, I came to be that way listening to smart bartenders. This guy uses Ritt BIB, baby Saz and various Wellers for his unique drinks. One of the classiest "wells" in the city.Not implying I would make a regular thing out of it... I just want to try it :grin:

CorvallisCracker
05-05-2011, 17:33
I really don't understand why people even consider using rare/premium shit for mixing.

Silly you. Don't you know that the best Bloody Marys are made with Stolichnaya Elit?


and don't forget a generous dose of Tabasco!

cas
05-06-2011, 15:51
Well I tried the Van Winkle rye in a Sazerac last night and was actually a bit disapointed. It was almost a little too strongly flavored - the rye seemed too up-front instead of harmonizing with the other tastes. So it was a good experiment, and I might try it again sometime, but for now I'll stick with some lighter ryes and drink the VW straight.
Craig

imbibehour
05-07-2011, 19:51
I agree that in general a top shelf product shouldn't be mixed with swill, but I also feel a top shelf high end product shouldn't really be in a cocktail, even if you mix it with something real high end also.

However, TRYING doesn't hurt, I mean what... there's still something left in the bottle right? But I would only do it at home and never in a bar.

My experience comes out disappointing too in the past with this. I took a very good agricole rum and made a basic mojito but it was really a waste. It was just better to drink the rum neat to enjoy it's nuances.

So I tend to stay away from this.