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ThomasH
01-20-2011, 15:14
I got a bottle of Wistlepig today. Even though it technically comes from Canada, I still like it. The proof is just right and I like the age too. Would also like to see some of this at barrel strength!

Thomas

unclebunk
01-20-2011, 15:23
I got a bottle of Wistlepig today. Even though it technically comes from Canada, I still like it. The proof is just right and I like the age too. Would also like to see some of this at barrel strength!

Thomas

I received a bottle for my birthday in October and only recently cracked it open. I really enjoyed it as well but found it quite different from the rest of the ryes on my bar.

callmeox
01-20-2011, 16:22
I'm expecting a bottle in a week or two and I'm looking forward to running it through is paces (and my liver).

nblair
01-20-2011, 16:51
I received a bottle for my birthday in October and only recently cracked it open. I really enjoyed it as well but found it quite different from the rest of the ryes on my bar.

I enjoyed a pour of this today, and you're right, it is totally different than any other rye I've ever had (due to the unique mashbill I assume). It is very complex, and I think it is very similar to a normal rye up until the finish. I like it a lot and am glad I bought a bottle, but don't know if I'd re-up for another $70.

imbibehour
01-20-2011, 17:01
I love it also, even for the price I paid I would buy it again great stuff...

dbk
01-21-2011, 08:55
Even though it technically comes from Canada, I still like it.
As a Canadian, I find this hilarious. Any time Canadian whisky is so much as mentioned on SB, it gets slagged off. Here, we've got a rye that just about everybody who's tasted it has loved, and it's "technically" Canadian—that must scare the pants off of some folks. :slappin:

Imagine what the world would say of American whiskey if it was judged solely on the taste of Old Crow and Jeremiah Weed. Yes, there is plenty of garbage produced in the name of "Canadian whisky," but there is also some seriously good stuff, like Whistlepig, Caribou Crossing, Forty Creek (e.g., Double Barrel Reserve, Confederation Oak Reserve), Alberta Premium (both the NAS and 25 year-old), Lot 40, and Wiser's (18 year-old and Red Letter).

It's just a shame to me that the only way people feel they can save face when enjoying a Canadian whisky is to precede the term with adjectives like "technically." :rolleyes:

sku
01-21-2011, 09:07
As a Canadian, I find this hilarious. Any time Canadian whisky is so much as mentioned on SB, it gets slagged off. Here, we've got a rye that just about everybody who's tasted it has loved, and it's "technically" Canadian—that must scare the pants off of some folks. :slappin:

Imagine what the world would say of American whiskey if it was judged solely on the taste of Old Crow and Jeremiah Weed. Yes, there is plenty of garbage produced in the name of "Canadian whisky," but there is also some seriously good stuff, like Whistlepig, Caribou Crossing, Forty Creek (e.g., Double Barrel Reserve, Confederation Oak Reserve), Alberta Premium (both the NAS and 25 year-old), Lot 40, and Wiser's (18 year-old and Red Letter).

It's just a shame to me that the only way people feel they can save face when enjoying a Canadian whisky is to precede the term with adjectives like "technically." :rolleyes:

Point well taken and this thread should probably be in the foreign whiskeys forum, but I think there are a few reasons for this with regard to both WhistlePig and other Canadians.

First, Pickerell is not exactly promoting the Canadian heritage of this whiskey. While he very clearly states that it's Canadian, Vermont is on the front of the label and Canada is on the back, and it's labeled as a "straight rye whiskey," a US term, as opposed to a "Canadian Whisky".

And unfortunately, we don't get any Alberta Premium in the states, and I don't think I've ever seen those Wisers either. It's only very recently that we've been seeing any quality Canadians come over here. Up until about a year ago, the Canadian shelves of even really good liquor stores in the US were dominated by Crown, Club, Mist and other bottom shelf booze, with only Forty Creek standing for quality (and I haven't seen the Confederation Oak yet either). Now we have a few more, but not many, and WhistlePig is usually in the American whiskey section (because most liquor store owners probably don't know that it's Canadian or fear it won't sell if they stick it on that shelf).

I would love to try some of the interesting stuff coming out of Canada right now, and hopefully we'll get a chance at it.

unclebunk
01-21-2011, 09:32
Point well taken and this thread should probably be in the foreign whiskeys forum, but I think there are a few reasons for this with regard to both WhistlePig and other Canadians.

First, Pickerell is not exactly promoting the Canadian heritage of this whiskey. While he very clearly states that it's Canadian, Vermont is on the front of the label and Canada is on the back, and it's labeled as a "straight rye whiskey," a US term, as opposed to a "Canadian Whisky".

And unfortunately, we don't get any Alberta Premium in the states, and I don't think I've ever seen those Wisers either. It's only very recently that we've been seeing any quality Canadians come over here. Up until about a year ago, the Canadian shelves of even really good liquor stores in the US were dominated by Crown, Club, Mist and other bottom shelf booze, with only Forty Creek standing for quality (and I haven't seen the Confederation Oak yet either). Now we have a few more, but not many, and WhistlePig is usually in the American whiskey section (because most liquor store owners probably don't know that it's Canadian or fear it won't sell if they stick it on that shelf).

I would love to try some of the interesting stuff coming out of Canada right now, and hopefully we'll get a chance at it.


Nice post, Sku. I see where dbk is coming from as well but, as you said, we've no doubt been jaded by the paucity of quality Canadian products on our shelves. I've been seriously interested in getting my hands on some Alberta Premium for several years but haven't managed to pull it off. Is the AP 25 still in production? I wonder if the WhistlePig and Alberta Premium share close similarities. Perhaps one of our Canadian friends can fill us in on that question if they've tried both. I think the WhistlePig Rye is terrific and heartily recommend it to all rye lovers.

dbk
01-21-2011, 10:44
Pickerell is not exactly promoting the Canadian heritage of this whiskey. While he very clearly states that it's Canadian, Vermont is on the front of the label and Canada is on the back, and it's labeled as a "straight rye whiskey," a US term, as opposed to a "Canadian Whisky".

True enough, but my quibble isn't with how Pickerell chooses to promote it—it's with the constant digs at Canadian whisky, even though the sample available to the critics is admittedly very narrow. I'm not trying to stir the pot, just pointing out something I've noticed as a recurring trend. In any case, I've also noticed that some folks such as yourself, Sku, are giving some Canadian whiskies (such as Forty Creek) a chance. It's appreciated!


I wonder if the WhistlePig and Alberta Premium share close similarities. Perhaps one of our Canadian friends can fill us in on that question if they've tried both. I think the WhistlePig Rye is terrific and heartily recommend it to all rye lovers.
Good question. Here's (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showpost.php?p=217017&postcount=37) what Gary Gillman has to say on that matter.

birdman1099
01-21-2011, 11:26
The best Canadian whiskey I have ever had.....


The best 100%rye whiskey I have ever had....

unclebunk
01-21-2011, 11:55
Good question. Here's (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showpost.php?p=217017&postcount=37) what Gary Gillman has to say on that matter.

I thought I had read that somewhere, but I didn't want to pass along any misinformation. So, are we here in the US simply paying a "premium" price for extra-aged Alberta Premium? Not that I'm complaining, as it's a very fine whiskey.
.

dbk
01-21-2011, 12:10
So, are we here in the US simply paying a "premium" price for extra-aged Alberta Premium? Not that I'm complaining, as it's a very fine whiskey.
Well, if I understand Gary's post, and assuming his hypothesis is correct, then the answer to your question is "no". You're paying for something that would only make up a small fraction of Alberta Springs, one of Alberta Distillers' whiskies; on its own, it has no specified market value, because until now it has never been on the market. That said, if people are swooning over it, then it seems that a price in the Caribou Crossing-Handy-Sazerac 18 range is to be expected.

That said, you folks in the US are the only ones paying for it, as it's not even available in Canada! Caribou Crossing is just making its way into Canada, and we're the ones paying a premium for it ;)

sku
01-21-2011, 12:31
Davin at Canadianwhisky.org has a very interesting write up of WhistlePig in which he notes that Alberta Premium and Hiram Walker are the only two Canadian distilleries which make 100% rye mash whiskey. Alberta uses unmalted and Walker uses malted rye.

http://www.canadianwhisky.org/news-views/whistlepig-10-year-old-straight-100-rye-whiskey.html


Most people do seem to think WhistlePig is the flavor whiskey from Alberta, but I don't know that I've ever heard anything definitive.

callmeox
01-21-2011, 13:07
While the distillate may be created in Canada, is it a Canadian Whisky in style? By this, I mean a combination of a straight with spirit whisky and up to nine point whatever percent other stuff.

My interpretation from those who have sampled it is that the "style" says American Straight not Canadian. Perhaps this is why people here use he weasel words when referring to it.

OscarV
01-21-2011, 13:13
While the distillate may be created in Canada, is it a Canadian Whisky? By this, I mean a combination of a straight with spirit whisky and up to nine point whatever percent other stuff.

My interpretation from those who have sampled it is that the "style" says American Straight not Canadian. Perhaps this is why people here use he weasel words when referring to it.

Whistle Pig is 100% Rye whiskey at 10 years old.
The Canadian distillery that Dave bought it from had it to color and flavor GNS to make Canadian Whiskey.
It got to be 10 years old because Canadian whiskey is slowing down in sales. On that note there are some "premium" Canadians coming out.
Also he can't say who he bought it from, just like here when someone buys bulk bourbon and creates a label they have agreeded not to reveal the source.

imbibehour
01-21-2011, 13:21
Canadian whisk(e)y in general has a very bad moniker in the US among whiskey fans, with many people refering to it as "brown vodka (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/10/AR2010081003354.html)".

People who do their research can find the stuff worth talking about.

As a dual citizen born and raised in Canada, myself and nobody I ever grew up with drank whiskey, not even my parents or their friends, everyone drank beer. Whiskey was for really old farts (and I mean OLD)...

That's changing, all be it slowly.

Whistlepig's naming and labeling is probably one part accuracy but also one part marketing.

What I do know, is that provincial liquor laws in Canada will make it near impossible for Canadians to get this product without paying a stupid amount of money, and that's a shame.

Parkersback
01-21-2011, 13:54
Canadian whisk(e)y in general has a very bad moniker in the US among whiskey fans...

Yes and no. It's pretty big in Michigan, being so close to the border. When I go in to bars in rural southeast MI, it'll be Jim and Jack on the bar, flanked by about 5-6 Canadians: Seagrams 7, VO, CC, Mist, CR, etc.

I basically prefer straights, but I'm also partial to Crown Royal, and really like the new CR Lot 16.

cowdery
01-21-2011, 14:50
The "technically" need not be construed as a dig at Canada or Canadian whiskey. Whistlepig is whiskey made in Canada, true, but it is stylistically unlike what we know -- at least in the USA -- as Canadian whiskey, not so much because it is 100% rye or 10-years-old, but because it satisfies the American requirements for straight rye whiskey, which I assume no other Canadian-made whiskey that's available on the market can do, the following specifications specifically:

- Distilled at less than 80% ABV. Most Canadian whiskey is distilled much higher.

- Aged in new, charred oak barrels. Most Canadian whiskey is aged in used cooperage.

So if 'Canadian whiskey' means whiskey made in Canada, then it's Canadian whiskey, but if it means whiskey made in the Canadian whiskey style and recognizable as Canadian whiskey, then it's not, hence the "technically."

Gillman
01-21-2011, 14:51
Aren't Crown Royal, and the others mentioned, really popular in the U.S.? I thought Canadian whisky always had a good image in the States.

Gary

dbk
01-21-2011, 15:37
The "technically" need not be construed as a dig at Canada or Canadian whiskey...
So if 'Canadian whiskey' means whiskey made in Canada, then it's Canadian whiskey, but if it means whiskey made in the Canadian whiskey style and recognizable as Canadian whiskey, then it's not, hence the "technically."
I would ordinarily agree with you on this point, Chuck, but in the context of the original statement, the "technically" seems like a dig to me:


Even though it technically comes from Canada, I still like it.
Having flanked "it technically comes from Canada" with "Even though" and "I still like it" implies pretty strongly that the "technically comes from Canada" is a euphemism for "comes from a place that makes crap whisky"—as in, "Even though it comes from a place that makes crap whisky, I still like it." ;)

Again, not trying to cause a ruckus; just wanted to cast another opinion on the matter.

CorvallisCracker
01-21-2011, 15:52
Aren't Crown Royal, and the others mentioned, really popular in the U.S.?

Sure is, Gary. In 2009, close to 16 million cases, more than bourbon and JD combined. See:

http://www.discus.org/pdf/YachtClubTables2010.pdf

(2010 figures should be out in a couple of weeks)


I thought Canadian whisky always had a good image in the States.

Depends on who's doing the imaging.

CorvallisCracker
01-21-2011, 15:54
Having flanked "it technically comes from Canada" with "Even though" and "I still like it" implies pretty strongly that the "technically comes from Canada" is a euphemism for "comes from a place that makes crap whisky"—as in, "Even though it comes from a place that makes crap whisky, I still like it." ;)

I still like George Dickel, even though it comes from Tennessee.

Gillman
01-21-2011, 16:07
Well, all is in the eye of the beholder, true enough, but many bourbon fans will admit to a respect for the Canadian style (or the best of it).

Gary

cowdery
01-22-2011, 15:45
The DISCUS data for 2010 is being released on Monday.

My "need not be construed as a dig" statement didn't mean it wasn't intended as, in part, a dig. I'm just saying that, in fact, "technically" actually is an accurate qualifier for an objective, not subjective, reason.

The image of Canadian whiskey in the United States depends on where you are, and tends to get more positive the closer you get to the Canadian border.

I have had a couple of instances where people wanted to get me a gift and as they said it, "I remembered you liked whiskey but didn't know what kind." A couple of times, the gift was Crown Royal, which has an image in some quarters as being a very fine, top shelf whiskey.

Gillman
01-22-2011, 19:18
I can't count the times I've seen it classified as a bourbon on menus in numerous parts of the U.S. This ticks me off no less than any other fervent bourbon fan. Still though there are times I want a Canadian whisky.

Gary

cigarnv
01-23-2011, 05:25
I would suspect that most non-Canadians have had few encounters with good quality Canadian whisky so they don't have a basis to define what a better quality CW is or could be. My take for years was they were all like the base offerings by Seagram's or CC which you typically ran into at buiness events, weddings, etc. When I was introduced to the CR Cask 16 I walked away with a much better appreciation of what Canadian whiskey could be....

Gillman
01-23-2011, 11:43
CR Special Reserve too is in a superior class IMO. One of the best recently is the pot still-heavy Wiser's Legacy which has a rich peppermint-like flavor. Still Canadian in style (I don't think new charred barrels are used) but quite different than any Wiser's product from before.

Gary

ebo
01-23-2011, 18:28
I still like George Dickel, even though it comes from Tennessee.
You bet! George Dickel 12 is one of my favorites. I always have it on hand.

ebo
01-23-2011, 18:32
Ok... I'm not a fan of Canadian whiskey. I find nothing special about the vaunted Crown Royal. What should I try that might sway my opinion of Canadian whiskey... that I can buy in Ohio?

callmeox
01-23-2011, 18:40
Forty Creek is now on the regular state list.

What's the story about Pendleton?

Crown Royal Cask 16?

Wiser's 18 is on the special order list.

Master_Photog
01-24-2011, 03:36
If I'm intrigued by the flavor, as I am with WhistlePig, then I'll have to be in the camp of 'not caring where it was distilled, bottled, labeled, etc.'

This is a fascinating spirit, and will only have NEAT.

http://www.cs2photography.com/wpigrye.jpg

cowdery
01-24-2011, 19:09
Here are the relevant numbers for 2010, from today's DISCUS report:

American Blended Whiskey -- 5.398 million cases
Bourbon & Tennessee Whiskey -- 15.443 million cases
(20.841 million cases)

Canadian Whisky -- 15.809 million cases

This is U.S. sales only.

So if you just compare Canadian to Bourbon/Tennessee, Canadian wins narrowly, but if you include American blended whiskey, so it's all American-made whiskey versus all Canadian-made whiskey, then American wins by a mile.

USA! USA! USA!

nblair
01-24-2011, 20:32
I can't help but join in an old fashioned USA chant...

USA! USA! USA! :usflag:

However, it is still kind of disappointing/embarrassing that the "official" spirit of the United States is outsold by Candian Whiskey here in the USA. I don't even want to see the Scotch numbers...

ThomasH
01-24-2011, 20:52
Ebo, try some Canadian Club 10yr. It is my favorite hands down. They have it in every liquor store in Stark county. It runs about 15.95 a 750!

Thomas

cowdery
01-24-2011, 23:15
You might be pleasantly surprised by the scotch numbers. Here's the whole whiskey table.

American Blended Whiskey -- 5.398 million cases
Bourbon & Tennessee --15.443 million cases
(All American -- 20.841 million cases)

Canadian -- 15.809 million cases

Blended Scotch -- 7,774 million cases
Single Malt Scotch -- 1,281 million cases
(All Scotch -- 9.055 million cases)

Irish -- 1,387 million cases

T Comp
01-25-2011, 05:23
The DISCUS report also confirms what many have subjectively noticed this past year with the super premium segment in Bourbon and Tennessee whiskey revenues increasing by 17% to 161 million. Most notably evident in this area I'd say by PVW 15, BTAC and MM 46 making for empty shelf space within days.

unclebunk
01-25-2011, 06:37
Most notably evident in this area I'd say by PVW 15, BTAC and MM 46 making for empty shelf space within days.

Are you hoarding again, T?:lol:

p_elliott
01-25-2011, 07:19
You might be pleasantly surprised by the scotch numbers. Here's the whole whiskey table.

American Blended Whiskey -- 5.398 million cases
Bourbon & Tennessee --15.443 million cases
(All American -- 20.841 million cases)

Canadian -- 15.809 million cases

Blended Scotch -- 7,774 million cases
Single Malt Scotch -- 1,281 million cases
(All Scotch -- 9.055 million cases)

Irish -- 1,387 million cases

I'll be damned :grin:

CorvallisCracker
01-25-2011, 09:37
You might be pleasantly surprised by the scotch numbers. Here's the whole whiskey table....

Total whiskey: 47.093 million cases

Vodka: 59.391 million cases

No surprise there, pleasant or otherwise.

nblair
01-25-2011, 10:43
You might be pleasantly surprised by the scotch numbers. Here's the whole whiskey table.

American Blended Whiskey -- 5.398 million cases
Bourbon & Tennessee --15.443 million cases
(All American -- 20.841 million cases)

Canadian -- 15.809 million cases

Blended Scotch -- 7,774 million cases
Single Malt Scotch -- 1,281 million cases
(All Scotch -- 9.055 million cases)

Irish -- 1,387 million cases

I'll be damned. Pleasantly surprised indeed, Chuck. Thanks for posting those.

imbibehour
01-28-2011, 10:58
Wow those numbers are eye opening!

Davindek
02-01-2011, 20:27
Just a few comments:

- Shelter Point distillery will soon release a 5 or 6 year old rye in the image of WhistlePig.

- Seagram's 7 is NOT Canadian whisky it is American whisky made in the USA.

- There is no GNS in Canadian whisky. Ever. American blended whisky may be up to 80% GNS. That's where the confusion comes from.

In Canada we don't call our whisky blended. By a 200 year old tradition we call it rye or Canadian whisky. I have an explanation of this up on my site right now.

I have tasted the raw base whisky from every distillery in Canada and NONE of them are neutral, despite the distillers calling them that. Some are very flavourful even as new make.

- The 9.09% is a measure to give Canada an even footing with American blended whisky in the U.S. market. We get a great U.S. tax break by including some American spirits or other spirits that get a tax break in the U.S. On $500 million in sales to the U.S. this makes a huge difference.

- Although the labels may look the same sometimes the 9.09% blenders are left out of the Canadian version of the same whisky. Most exports to the U.S. rarely include the full 9.09% either, by the way.

cowdery
02-01-2011, 20:33
Now that's what I call a first post!

You the man, D.

smokinjoe
02-01-2011, 21:14
Just a few comments:

- Shelter Point distillery will soon release a 5 or 6 year old rye in the image of WhistlePig.

- Seagram's 7 is NOT Canadian whisky it is American whisky made in the USA.

- There is no GNS in Canadian whisky. Ever. American blended whisky may be up to 80% GNS. That's where the confusion comes from.

In Canada we don't call our whisky blended. By a 200 year old tradition we call it rye or Canadian whisky. I have an explanation of this up on my site right now.

I have tasted the raw base whisky from every distillery in Canada and NONE of them are neutral, despite the distillers calling them that. Some are very flavourful even as new make.

- The 9.09% is a measure to give Canada an even footing with American blended whisky in the U.S. market. We get a great U.S. tax break by including some American spirits or other spirits that get a tax break in the U.S. On $500 million in sales to the U.S. this makes a huge difference.

- Although the labels may look the same sometimes the 9.09% blenders are left out of the Canadian version of the same whisky. Most exports to the U.S. rarely include the full 9.09% either, by the way.

Anybody gotta problem widdat?..................Huh?.......Anybody?...... ..........Well, I'll toast our Northern Neighbor's fine whiskey with a small pour of Bush Pilot's. Welcome, D.
:toast:

CaptainQ
02-01-2011, 21:19
"There is no GNS in Canadian whisky. Ever." Good to know, thanks.

Welcome to the site and great post. You neglected to list your site on your profile so where is it?

dbk
02-01-2011, 21:25
Davin's excellent Canadian whisky website is here: http://www.canadianwhisky.org/

He's also made a great contribution to Dave Broom's recent World Atlas of Whisky.

DeanSheen
02-02-2011, 05:29
Well, I'll toast our Northern Neighbor's fine whiskey with a small pour of Bush Pilot's.

Ahh, a taste of the good old days ehh Joe?

Davindek
02-02-2011, 06:49
Now that's what I call a first post!

You the man, D.

Gee Chuck, I'm blushing. Thanks.

I have followed this board for several years and finally figured out how to join last year some time. There is a lot of good information here about Canadian whisky along with a little bit of understandable misinformation. Among many others, I particularly enjoy Gillman's CW posts.

I didn't leave a link to my site as I get bored reading posts and comments (elsewhere) that seem intended only to troll for hits. Thanks DBK for pointing people to it.

I have had a review of Bush Pilot's in the queue for some time now but it keeps getting bumped. Currently it is scheduled for Feb 14. Bushido turned me onto this some years ago. I was a big fan of his Canadian whisky site, "Beauty Eh?", and a bit sad that being ahead of his time it didn't catch on.

Thanks guys for the warm welcome.

Now back to lurking.

Davin

Gillman
02-02-2011, 08:03
Good to see you here, Davin, and thanks for your comments.

Gary

T Comp
02-02-2011, 11:01
...

I didn't leave a link to my site as I get bored reading posts and comments (elsewhere) that seem intended only to troll for hits. Thanks DBK for pointing people to it.

I have had a review of Bush Pilot's in the queue for some time now but it keeps getting bumped. Currently it is scheduled for Feb 14. Bushido turned me onto this some years ago. I was a big fan of his Canadian whisky site, "Beauty Eh?", and a bit sad that being ahead of his time it didn't catch on.
...
Davin

I've got my one and only Bush Pilot's unopened in the bunker so I look forward to your review. I've enjoyed your site. Welcome aboard.

tmckenzie
02-02-2011, 17:41
Refresh me on bush pilot. Was it an unblended whiskey such as lot 40 or whistlepig?

CorvallisCracker
02-03-2011, 18:03
- The 9.09% is a measure to give Canada an even footing with American blended whisky in the U.S. market. We get a great U.S. tax break by including some American spirits or other spirits that get a tax break in the U.S. On $500 million in sales to the U.S. this makes a huge difference.

- Although the labels may look the same sometimes the 9.09% blenders are left out of the Canadian version of the same whisky. Most exports to the U.S. rarely include the full 9.09% either, by the way.

Great info Davin.

Do you know if the regs describing the cans/can'ts for exported whiskey are available anywhere online?

sailor22
02-04-2011, 06:31
Refresh me on bush pilot. Was it an unblended whiskey such as lot 40 or whistlepig?

I checked the label on one of mine and the label describes it as "unblended single cask Canadian Whisky" 13 yrs old - this particular one was bottled in '93. The color is very light so I'm guessing the barrel was either previously used, uncharred or toased.

If memory serves there isn't much similarity between it and Whistle Pig as far as taste.

squire
02-04-2011, 15:15
I picked up a pair of Bush Pilot along with a couple of Lot 40s and was impressed by both. By the time I got around to replacing them they were no longer available.

Davindek
02-06-2011, 07:52
Great info Davin.

Do you know if the regs describing the cans/can'ts for exported whiskey are available anywhere online?

You would have to check the regs in each importing country and various trade agreements as well.

Essentially, and as I recall from memory, it has to meet the definitions in the country of origin and the country it is exported to.

straightwhiskeyruffneck
02-27-2011, 23:03
I'm just never impressed with Canadian whiskey like the way I am with straight bourbon or rye. First off what does "blended" mean anyway? I always thought it ment taking "straight" whiskey and "blending" it with GNS. Anyways I dont really care if I offend anyone infatuated with Canadian juice cuz this is a bourbon n' rye forum anyway! Ok I admit I haven't really tasted much of the finer canadiens, but I'm often bored with low proof, light colored, or high priced gimmick packaging with no good reason behind the price tag. I'll try the whistlepig however, because it's essentially an American. Straight rye with an age statement and NOT 80 proof. This is what WE like about OUR whiskey!
God bless America

smokinjoe
02-28-2011, 06:17
I'm just never impressed with Canadian whiskey like the way I am with straight bourbon or rye. First off what does "blended" mean anyway? I always thought it ment taking "straight" whiskey and "blending" it with GNS. Anyways I dont really care if I offend anyone infatuated with Canadian juice cuz this is a bourbon n' rye forum anyway! Ok I admit I haven't really tasted much of the finer canadiens, but I'm often bored with low proof, light colored, or high priced gimmick packaging with no good reason behind the price tag. I'll try the whistlepig however, because it's essentially an American. Straight rye with an age statement and NOT 80 proof. This is what WE like about OUR whiskey!
God bless America

Interesting post, SWR. Short, and....pointless. :rolleyes:

dbk
02-28-2011, 06:28
I'm just never impressed with Canadian whiskey like the way I am with straight bourbon or rye. First off what does "blended" mean anyway? I always thought it ment taking "straight" whiskey and "blending" it with GNS. Anyways I dont really care if I offend anyone infatuated with Canadian juice cuz this is a bourbon n' rye forum anyway! Ok I admit I haven't really tasted much of the finer canadiens, but I'm often bored with low proof, light colored, or high priced gimmick packaging with no good reason behind the price tag. I'll try the whistlepig however, because it's essentially an American. Straight rye with an age statement and NOT 80 proof. This is what WE like about OUR whiskey!
God bless America

As Davin pointed out in this very thread (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showpost.php?p=232648&postcount=42), "blended" Canadian whisky does not contain GNS—Canadians don't even use the label "blended" for their whisky in domestic markets. Moreover, as he pointed out elsewhere (http://www.canadianwhisky.org/news-views/the-essence-of-canadian-rye.html) to me (see the comments section), Canadians historically made bourbon, and still make use of many of the same methods, including "bourbon" mashes and new charred oak, to this day. And as for the argument that "This what WE like about OUR whiskey," the recent DISCUS figures would argue otherwise: Americans seem more than happy to drink the Canadian whisky you deride alongside American whiskey.

In any case, if you enjoy sucking back that WhistlePig—and it is indeed very good stuff—know that this is just the Canadian version of a Trojan horse. You will soon be voting for universal Medicare, higher taxes, and stricter gun laws. That's how we get you.

Oh, and God save the Queen.

Parkersback
02-28-2011, 06:33
I'm just never impressed with Canadian whiskey like the way I am with straight bourbon or rye. First off what does "blended" mean anyway? I always thought it ment taking "straight" whiskey and "blending" it with GNS. Anyways I dont really care if I offend anyone infatuated with Canadian juice cuz this is a bourbon n' rye forum anyway! Ok I admit I haven't really tasted much of the finer canadiens, but I'm often bored with low proof, light colored, or high priced gimmick packaging with no good reason behind the price tag. I'll try the whistlepig however, because it's essentially an American. Straight rye with an age statement and NOT 80 proof. This is what WE like about OUR whiskey!
God bless America

This thread might help clear up some of your misunderstandings about Canadian whiskey.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15310

Parkersback
02-28-2011, 06:37
Sorry, DBK, you beat me to the punch.

cowdery
02-28-2011, 09:45
You have to know some history that is now more than a century old to understand the importance of words like "blended" and "straight" in the whiskey lexicon, as well as what those words actually mean. This knowledge is not obscure but you do have to make the effort to learn it. You also have to care if you come across on line as a moron or not. This just reflects the diversity of humanity, as it "it takes all kinds."

pepcycle
02-28-2011, 11:59
Chuck,

As you know, someone has to come across as an idiot on-line and I resent this neophyte Johnny Come Lately trouncing around in my domain.

It's gonna take a lot more than simple derision of our Northern Neighbors and insulting their products to take that away from me.

Consider this the throwing down of the cutlet!!

cowdery
02-28-2011, 12:06
Ed,

I think your status here is unassailable.

pepcycle
03-01-2011, 12:37
Thanks Chuck,
I appreciate your support.
Like the memorable words of my hero, Lloyd Christmas.

Unfortunately, I forget them.

whskylvr
03-01-2011, 19:42
Don't forget that run down no good Crown Royal line of Canadian Whiskey that has some of the best bourbon going into it. Diageo has a way with these things.

Buffalo Bill
10-09-2011, 22:30
How does Wistlepig size up with little Saz and big Saz?

jburlowski
10-10-2011, 04:37
Different enough to almost be an apples-to-oranges comparison.

tanstaafl2
09-14-2012, 07:46
WhistlePig (the original 10 yo bottling) seems to be getting a broader release. It was recently made available in Georgia and so I picked up a bottle based on the seemingly near universal aclaim for this rye (OK, that statement might be a little broad but it does seem to get good reviews!). I presume this is the same stuff that came out in 2010? The bottle appears to be the same. Perhaps they are sending out what is left in anticipation of the upcoming 11 and 12 yo ryes that are supposed to be coming (at higher prices naturally).

In any case I look forward to giving it a try myself.

Gillman
09-14-2012, 07:54
Excellent product, very much a straight but in a lighter style than most U.S. rye I've had. The older whiskey, when released, should be even better.

Gary

tanstaafl2
09-14-2012, 08:04
Excellent product, very much a straight but in a lighter style than most U.S. rye I've had. The older whiskey, when released, should be even better.

Gary

Thanks. I look forward to trying it and comparing it to the Jefferson 10yo rye and perhaps even the Pendleton 1910 rye which I definitely find to be a bit lighter than others like the Saz and Willet ryes.

Gillman
09-14-2012, 09:07
The Jefferson you mentioned is from the same source I understand, so it should be similar to Whistlepig. Not sure I recall the Pendleton, is that supposed to be from the same source too, i.e., a rye mash aged 10 years in new charred wood, or is it a more conventional Canadian whisky?

Gary

tanstaafl2
09-14-2012, 10:17
The Jefferson you mentioned is from the same source I understand, so it should be similar to Whistlepig. Not sure I recall the Pendleton, is that supposed to be from the same source too, i.e., a rye mash aged 10 years in new charred wood, or is it a more conventional Canadian whisky?

Gary

The Pendleton 1910 (http://www.pendletonwhisky.com/wp-content/uploads/1910_LaunchRelease.pdf)is a 12yo 100% Canadian rye bottled in Oregon by Hood River "Distillers" (I don't think they actually distill anything although as best as I can tell they don't claim to either other than the name) that is a bit handicapped by being bottled at 80 proof. But it is a nice clean light sipping rye to my palate. The source is not revealed but speculation I have seen from other sources (http://www.canadianwhisky.org/reviews/pendleton-1910-canadian-rye-whisky-40-alc-vol.html)is that it too comes from Alberta.

Decently priced in the mid $30's and a somewhat swanky looking bottle to boot.

mrviognier
09-15-2012, 09:50
Really like the WhistlePig, but the price tag keeps it from becoming a regular sipper. Recently tried WP, Jefferson's 10 and Mastertson's at one sitting. Undeniably similar, with the biggest difference (for me, anyway) being the proofs. I really like the Jefferson's 10...especially because you can buy two bottle of it for the price of one bottle of WP.

jburlowski
09-15-2012, 12:59
Really like the WhistlePig, but the price tag keeps it from becoming a regular sipper. Recently tried WP, Jefferson's 10 and Mastertson's at one sitting. Undeniably similar, with the biggest difference (for me, anyway) being the proofs. I really like the Jefferson's 10...especially because you can buy two bottle of it for the price of one bottle of WP.

I agree... the WhistlePig is better whiskey (better barrel selection from the same source?). But Jeff rye wins based on QPR.

MacinJosh
09-17-2012, 06:09
I'm still looking forward to the 111 WP, or whatever it's called, that should be released soon.

tanstaafl2
10-08-2012, 05:21
Last night I sat down with the WP 100 proof and Jeff 10 94 proof for a comparison (in the midst of comparing a variety of whiskeys with several friends) and the unanimous consensus was similar to what has been noted. The WP was the better whiskey although the price point for each does a good bit to help level the playing field. But if price were no issue then the WP was preferred drink.

The only difference was the WP was newly opened while the Jeff had been open awhile (although it was still nearly full). Not sure how much, if any, difference that might make.

Also forgot to get out the Pendleton 1910 12yo 80 proof out to add to the comparison but I think it would still have fallen well short of the WP based on my memory of it.

Shell
10-14-2012, 12:22
Ok... I'm not a fan of Canadian whiskey. I find nothing special about the vaunted Crown Royal. What should I try that might sway my opinion of Canadian whiskey... that I can buy in Ohio?

Try Crown Royal Special Reserve - it is an outstanding whisky. (And, much, much better that the standard Crown Royal.)

Shell

Shell
10-14-2012, 12:27
Really like the WhistlePig, but the price tag keeps it from becoming a regular sipper. Recently tried WP, Jefferson's 10 and Mastertson's at one sitting. Undeniably similar, with the biggest difference (for me, anyway) being the proofs. I really like the Jefferson's 10...especially because you can buy two bottle of it for the price of one bottle of WP.

The similarities likely reinforce the (unproven) perception that all three are from the same Canadian source. I have only had the Jefferson's Rye, which recently became available in MI. I found it to be an outstanding rye.

Shell

tanstaafl2
10-17-2012, 15:55
I noted with interest that an email flyer from Drink up NY listed WhistlePig "TripleOne" as they called it was now available for "presale" and was expected to ship on or about November 2nd, along with a number of other liquors. Getting where it is like buying a new DVD or CD.

The price was conveniently not mentioned in the email although the website (http://www.drinkupny.com/WhistlePig_TripleOne_Straight_Rye_Whiskey_p/s1315.htm) lists it at $129.99 but available on presale for $108.99. So the predicted $111 is close but apparently not a requirement. I will probably not be adding this one to my liquor cabinet. I will just have to make do with the nasty old 100 proof 10 year old at two thirds the cost.