PDA

View Full Version : Glasses made from empty bottles



silverfish
02-03-2011, 07:09
Came across this Etsy store (http://www.etsy.com/shop/bottlehood?section_id=6656255) that makes "Recycled glasses from
wine, beer, soda and liquor bottles" (tho' a better description
might be "glasses from recycled bottles".) The vodka examples
shown look quite nice and have me checking out my stash to
see what bourbon bottles might make nice glassware.

birdman1099
02-03-2011, 08:09
Pretty cool....

The BTAC bottles would make great rocks glasses.....

birdman1099
02-03-2011, 08:18
Here is a virtural rendering...

barturtle
02-03-2011, 09:24
Here is a virtural rendering...

You'd probably lose the paper label, even if not in production, but the first time you washed them.

birdman1099
02-03-2011, 09:39
You'd probably lose the paper label, even if not in production, but the first time you washed them.


Man, what a stickler....

birdman1099
02-03-2011, 09:41
I'm surprised you didn't mention the fact that the glass would be clear, not brown.... but my response would be..... "Its a picture of one of my big pours....":grin:

pepcycle
02-03-2011, 10:05
I saw a kit for this.

Its a frame with rollers and glass cutter.

It has a candle to heat the score line and then you put ice on it.

Has some sort of polishing (diamond dust) powder.

I think it was about $30.

Arts and Crafts at the Gazebo?

MarkEdwards
02-03-2011, 10:33
I saw a kit for this.

Its a frame with rollers and glass cutter.
It has a candle to heat the score line and then you put ice on it.
Has some sort of polishing (diamond dust) powder.
I think it was about $30.


These were quite the popular thing in the mid 70's, sold on late-night TV along with cloth glue, Ginsu knives and clothing-stud kits,

I even owned one at one time. They require a bit of practice and lots of patience, and don't always work quite right, but make really cool glasses when you do get it all right.

CaptainQ
02-03-2011, 14:22
These were quite the popular thing in the mid 70's, sold on late-night TV along with cloth glue, Ginsu knives and clothing-stud kits,

I even owned one at one time. They require a bit of practice and lots of patience, and don't always work quite right, but make really cool glasses when you do get it all right.

http://i55.tinypic.com/6zlqqg.jpg

fishnbowljoe
02-03-2011, 14:38
Pretty cool....

The BTAC bottles would make great rocks glasses.....

IIRC, Tony (ACDetroit) was thinking about doing this a while back. Joe

silverfish
02-04-2011, 07:04
http://i55.tinypic.com/6zlqqg.jpg

I did a google search and found one on amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Armour-Products-Bottle-and-Cutter/dp/B0018N6RR8) for $25.
I suppose that after a bit of practice (like Mark says) on "junky" bottles,
you could try it on the ones you really wanted to do. And it'd be cheaper
too!

cowdery
02-04-2011, 10:02
I know that with glass recycling you're told not to put things such as glassware and window glass in the recycling. That may strictly be a safety thing, although I've never seen a similar caution about not putting broken bottles in the recycling and they would be just as hazardous. Still, I wonder if there is something about the way bottles are made versus the way glassware is made that makes a glass made from a bottle ultimately unsuitable as a glass.

That said, I was fascinated with the idea when these cutters were widely advertised, although I never got one. That and the in-shell egg scrambler. Because breaking an egg and then scrambling it is so inconvenient.

pepcycle
02-04-2011, 13:35
And the next thing you know, Fried Marbles will be back.

Medicfrost
02-04-2011, 15:24
If you drink straight out of the bottle, it automatically becomes your glass.

Rotgut
02-08-2011, 07:08
If you drink straight out of the bottle, it automatically becomes your glass.

Nice! Does it count if you use a straw?

I kind of like the idea of these glasses but I couldn't find too many bourbon bottles that I thought would work. ER or Stagg; a huge BT glass, maybe.

I didn't have the kit in the '70's, but I remember the fad. I tried my hand at making a few glasses. I had a way that sort of worked that was dangerous and stupid and fun. It involved fire and a hammer (I was a kid - I had to make do). No kit necessary.

I'm sure if you google a bit there are lots of DIY ways to do it.

Mike

bgast1
04-02-2011, 14:54
Wow, this looks pretty cool. Never thought about it. I am going to get my Jameson bottle out of the trash and see what I can do. I became a Lapidary Artist after I lost my job and I already have some tools that I might be able to use. But aren't the bottles a bit big around in some cases?

Stu
04-02-2011, 15:29
I've never done one, but I've seen them done with the top of the bottle glued to the bottom of the glass, making stemmed glassware. I knew a guy who had a set of San Miguel glasses made this way.

sailor22
04-02-2011, 17:50
As I recall a lot of the glasses made from those kits in the 70's weren't particularly robust. Most bottles are seamed and not designed for long use and repeated hot and cold cycles.

Some of those in the link look really cool though. I bet some of the Old Charter bottles with embossed wheat on the sides would make nice looking tumblers as would the hand blown looking High West bottles.