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jbillin
03-03-2011, 08:08
It seems that everyday brings new unaged or lightly-aged whiskeys to my local liquor store's shelves. I've been told these used to be called "white dog" whiskeys. There are malts, wheats, ryes and even millets. (Millet, imagine that!) So, it makes sense that today's "white dog" will eventually become tomorrow's sipping whiskey. When these white whiskeys "grow up", which are you most eager sample?

White Dog
03-03-2011, 08:20
Huh???? Micro Baby Bourbons aged too long? What hot-climate Microdistiller has a bourbon older than 15yrs?

Maybe I need more coffee, but I'm confused.

p_elliott
03-03-2011, 08:34
It seems that everyday brings new unaged or lightly-aged whiskeys to my local liquor store's shelves. I've been told these used to be called "white dog" whiskeys. There are malts, wheats, ryes and even millets. (Millet, imagine that!) So, it makes sense that today's "white dog" will eventually become tomorrow's sipping whiskey. When these white whiskeys "grow up", which are you most eager sample?


See this post

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15464

White Dog
03-03-2011, 08:39
Huh???? Micro Baby Bourbons aged too long? What hot-climate Microdistiller has a bourbon older than 15yrs?

Maybe I need more coffee, but I'm confused.

JBillin changed his post. My response was to his original text.

Josh
03-03-2011, 09:28
It seems that everyday brings new unaged or lightly-aged whiskeys to my local liquor store's shelves. I've been told these used to be called "white dog" whiskeys. There are malts, wheats, ryes and even millets. (Millet, imagine that!) So, it makes sense that today's "white dog" will eventually become tomorrow's sipping whiskey. When these white whiskeys "grow up", which are you most eager sample?

I think the ones you mention are the ones I'd most like to try. Stuff made with unusual grains like oats, millet, triticale, and the straight wheat whiskeys, not to mention the handfuls of fruit brandies that are being made too. I think in a few years the world of microdistilling will seperate the wheat (or triticale) from the chaff, as it were. We can start saying "This is good and this isn't" instead of saying everything has "potential".

squire
03-03-2011, 16:35
I recall reading that at one time during the Colonial Period peach brandy was the most widely available distillate in the Georgia Colony.

jburlowski
03-03-2011, 18:12
I find them all to be grossly underaged and grossly overpriced. What's the point?

squire
03-03-2011, 18:14
Well John, I recon the point is you will be saving some money.

B.B. Babington
03-03-2011, 19:50
Most are overpriced and some are obscenely overpriced. By "overpriced" I mean that if you're looking for a good value compared to other bottles, get something else. By "obscene" I mean some are going for price gouging hoping some sucker will by it. But many micro-distillers have to charge more because it costs them more to produce. They pay more just for an empty bottle than the big guys might pay for some fllled, labled, and cartoned bottles.

However, if you like sampling different flavors and trying some interesting innovative products, then the micro-distlillery stuff shouldn't be overlooked. Some of these guys and gals are really producing some amazing products.

B.B. Babington
03-03-2011, 20:09
sorry I didn't answer the question. the unaged/underaged whiskeys I'm most interested in trying are authentic bai jiu and similar products.

funknik
03-03-2011, 21:34
It seems that everyday brings new unaged or lightly-aged whiskeys to my local liquor store's shelves.
You're seeing unaged and lightly aged whiskeys showing up at your local NH liquor store? Do tell.

jbillin
03-04-2011, 05:18
292 Madison Ave., NYC - great liquor store. Try it next time you get out of the woods.

squire
03-04-2011, 09:30
Morning jbillin, I can't say that I'm eager to try any of them as I prefer a grown up product. I would like to sample a millet whisky with some age on it simply because my family used to grow millet as a crop on one of the farms.

awhiskeydrink
03-04-2011, 10:12
I've been looking around for some micro-distilleries in Texas. Does anyone know of some worth trying. I see many are Canadian blends simply marketed as texan. Others taste of sweet corn. I in no way want to knock these distilleries because I'm so excited about what they are trying to do. I'd just like to sample and review some good ones.

Oh, and I do see some under age ryes popping up where the balance of sweet and bite make them worth the try.

Cheers,
Swift www.awhiskeydrink.com

squire
03-04-2011, 10:21
There are Swift but names escapes me at the present. Some searching here might help, or others may chime in.

Josh
03-04-2011, 10:51
I'll chime in with the only ones I know: Garrison Brothers in Hye and Balcones in Waco. Searches on both should turn up some information.

Balcones doesn't make a bourbon yet but they have made some very good aged and unaged Corn Whiskeys (for those who drink such things). They also make a sugar spirit called rumble and peated and unpeated malt whiskeys, which I haven't tried.

DreamTheater
10-15-2011, 21:46
Well, I am approaching a year late to this topic but whatever.

I went to Baylor and, upon a recent visit to the city of Waco, found out about Balcones.

I have to say something to the poster jburlowski above (yes, 7 months later - sorry). I agree. Digging into the pocket for these hurts. I've never bought a micro-distillery that costs less than $35 and the Baby Blue put me back $45, the True Blue put me back $55 and the Rumble put me back $45 as well. I did it all in one day too. That one hurt.

The reason I do it is because they are trying something that has to be very hard to do. Start up costs are high, you dont produce a damn thing that will make you a profit for...at least three years!!! This is all quite worthwhile to me.

Whenever I go somewhere new in this country and find a local (i.e. in that state) whiskey being produced - I will buy sight untasted and regardless of the price.

B.B. Babington
10-16-2011, 17:40
...Whenever I go somewhere new in this country and find a local (i.e. in that state) whiskey being produced - I will buy sight untasted and regardless of the price.
I'm with ya on this one. I don't mind getting ripped off once to try some new flavors...and have come across some interesting finds along the way.

bad_scientist
10-16-2011, 18:01
Anyone come across New Holland's various whiskeys?

http://newhollandbrew.com/spirits/

I've got a bottle of Hopquila in my closet. It's just white dog whiskey steeped in hops, and it tastes just like hops. Kinda sucks, but at the time it seemed like a great idea. It is, however, very, very easy to drink, since I love IPAs. I believe Centennial hops were used.

I hear the Zeppelin Bend is really good, and their even smaller microbatches of whiskey are worth trying. I visit the area every year b/c my wife's family is from there, but haven't gotten to try any of the other whiskeys because the brewery charges $14-16 for a pour, a ridiculous price considering I can get old S-W stuff here in DC for basically the same amount! They could charge half the price and I'd buy pours for the whole bar, plus I'd bring home a bottle or ten, but it's that entry price point barrier that stops me.

Leopold
10-16-2011, 19:03
Michigan is a State operated system, and the mandated markup is brutal for the distiller. If I recall, it's 65% before all the State taxes kick in.

So picture what that means if you want to sell a simple dram at your distillery versus what distilleries in places like DC can do... which is sell that dram with 0% markup.

bad_scientist
10-16-2011, 19:07
Ouch! That's crazy, especially considering how enthusiastic a brewing/distilling state Michigan is. Lots of brilliant people there.

However, New Holland charges only half the price for their gin and vodka, which they also distill...


Michigan is a State operated system, and the mandated markup is brutal for the distiller. If I recall, it's 65% before all the State taxes kick in.

So picture what that means if you want to sell a simple dram at your distillery versus what distilleries in places like DC can do... which is sell that dram with 0% markup.

White Dog
10-16-2011, 19:16
Ouch! That's crazy, especially considering how enthusiastic a brewing/distilling state Michigan is. Lots of brilliant people there.

However, New Holland charges only half the price for their gin and vodka, which they also distill...

"Distill?" Don't you mean "rectify?" One of the owners admitted to using GNS for their Vodka and Gin.

bad_scientist
10-16-2011, 21:01
"Distill?" Don't you mean "rectify?" One of the owners admitted to using GNS for their Vodka and Gin.

Didn't know that. Those never appealed to me but now they really don't.

Has anyone tried the Smooth Ambler Yearling bourbon? I've heard great things about their gin from some very picky people. The first batch sold out so fast, I never got a chance to sample it.

Josh
10-16-2011, 21:37
The New Holland Knickerbocker Gin is actually pretty good. I think they redistill and gin-ify it at their facility.

DreamTheater
10-16-2011, 23:43
Wow. That place looks awesome. I am going to have to see if I can scare up some of their whiskey. There is a place in California I'll be going in a year's time and I'll have to pick up a few and report back.

tmckenzie
10-17-2011, 04:25
The bourbon Smooth Ambler put out was good stuff. One of the few, along with ours you would actually recognize as being bourbon. Show a lot of promise for what is to come.