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Robmo
03-07-2011, 07:20
I want to form a picture of what a liquor store's bourbon shelf looked like in the seventies--one of bourbon's dark ages! I was born in 1970 so I'll need help from more knowledgeable hands to pull this off. This is what I've got so far, based on some cursory research on the Internet. Feel free to correct my errors or add details. Let's hear your memories!

No Blanton's, Booker's, Knob Creek, or Woodford Reserve. :cry:
Maker's Mark was still obscure--you couldn't get in your average liquor store (assuming you knew what it was).
Old Crow outsold Jim Beam
IW Harper was still around
There were a lot of the "old standbys": Old Fitzgerald, Old Charter, Old Forester, OGD.

(Also, what was it like to walk into a bar in the 70s and order a bourbon on the rocks? What was stocked behind the bar?)

Gillman
03-07-2011, 07:29
There were different iterations of Beam, including Beam's Choice and various decanter offerings.

Maker's Mark was available albeit not everywhere.

Evan Williams was the big Heaven Hill brand, and still is, that had national distribution. Ezra Brooks from Medley was widely available and was great (all the bourbons mentioned here were).

You had Ancient Age from what is now Buffalo Trace Distillery owned by Sazerac Brands.

You had Kentucky Tavern, Old Fitzgerald in different ages, to represent further wheaters. KT has been a wheater and non-at various times but it was a wheater in the 1970's I think.

There was Old Forester and Early Times from Brown Forman.

There was Old-Gran-dad from National Distillers and Old Taylor, some of that is still on shelves in America but less and less as time goes by.

There was the fruity, strawberry-like Old Yellowstone from Louisville. There was Benchmark from Seagram, rich and rum-like.

There were countless price brands too.

This is just a sampling but gives an idea of what you would expect to find.

Nationally, in the bars of the country, Old Gran-dad was a standby, also Forester.

Gary

Robmo
03-07-2011, 07:53
Thanks for the reply and the great information!

dave ziegler
03-07-2011, 07:56
In those days just about every Store had Old Hickory Bourbon in the 80 proof and the 10 yr 86 proof plus other brands of Continentals such as Charter Oak BIB, Hallers County Fair BIB, and many others. Also there were great Rye Whiskeys such as our Rittenhouse Rye and National Distillers Mount Vernon Striaght Rye. Continental also made a Philadelphia Straight Rye whiskey. But when I walked into the old Pottstown State store the first thing you saw was Old Hickory Bourbon, we also has a 20 yr version.
Dave Z
It seems All The Nicest People Drink Old Hickory
America's Most Magnificent Bourbon

Robmo
03-07-2011, 08:52
there were great Rye Whiskeys such as our Rittenhouse Rye and National Distillers Mount Vernon Striaght Rye. Continental also made a Philadelphia Straight Rye whiskey.

You're making my mouth water. When did those ryes start disappearing from the shelves?
I wish I could try Old Hickory.

sku
03-07-2011, 09:22
I have a 1960 catalogue from a Los Angeles liquor store that I described in this thread:

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12290&highlight=old+catalogue

cowdery
03-07-2011, 09:25
Although I was around in the 70s I wasn't paying much attention to bourbon. I have asked old-timers this question and the answer they give is that while there were many more distilleries and many more brands there was actually less variety than there is now, as everyone was pretty much making the same thing. In the 70s especially, as sales began to tumble, there was a 'race to the bottom' among producers, lowering their prices to keep or gain share, and cheapening their products in the process. Many distilleries stopped doubling, for example. A very dark age indeed.

Gillman
03-07-2011, 09:36
That 1960 catalogue was useful and reminded me of many brands I saw on the shelves that I omitted in my first post such as JW Dant, IW Harper, Wild Turkey of course, Bellows (a price brand and not great as I remember it), Walker's.

Dave mentioned the main ryes of the time to which we could add Old Overholt.

There were also various whiskeys from the late lamented Michter's.

And there was always corn whiskey on offer including some sold in, well, corny containers.

Gary

craigthom
03-07-2011, 14:56
I can't comment on the '70s, but I can on the mid-'80s, since I worked in a liquor store then.

There were three grades of Jack Daniel's, if you count Lem Motlow.

Blanton's was around, but it was the only premium bourbon, and was crazy-priced at around $20. For bourbon!

Old Ezra was 15 years old and cost about $15 in its nice wooden box. It was my favorite.

Early Times changed from bourbon to "Kentucky Whiskey" without warning. I just happened to notice the change on the label.

On a non-bourbon note, Laphroaig 10yr was just under $20.

squire
03-07-2011, 15:03
Rob the posters have covered the brands, I can only add there was more brand loyalty then than now in that folks would stick with one favorite to the exclusion of others and I believe most were taken with a mixer.

In 1972 for instance our local would have Wild Turkey, Makers Mark and Jack Daniels as top shelf. Dickel was considered up there if you could find it and it wasn't available locally.

Premiums were Forester, Grand Dad, Yellowstone, aged Charter, Harper, Taylor, Fitzgerald, Benchmark, Eagle Rare (a little later but still in the era), and Beam's Choice.

A slight step below were Crow, younger expressions of Charter, Harper, Ezra Brooks, Beam, Early Times, Cabin Still, Kentucky Tavern, Evan Williams, Dant and Ancient Age.

The lower shelf was a battle ground for the customers who refused to pay more than $5.00 for a bottle of whisky, Kentucky Beau, Sam Sykes, Daviss county, Charter Oak, Old Hickory and a few others.

Old Overholt from Pennsylvania was the only rye and it tended to stay on the shelves.

There were blends of course, Paul Jones, Segrams 7, but we didn't pay much attention to them, being Bourbon snobs. Yes, even the guy who cared for my Grandfather's packs of hounds and bird dogs was particular about what he drank. Certainly it was an identity thing and the men who molded me at the hunting camp would bring out a pint of Charter 7yr as their choice. It was from these guys I learned the only true valuable lesson about moonshine which is don't drink it unless you know the man who made it.

The brands and their prices were well known and the choice of brand served was a measure of your hospitality toward guests. A quaint comment to say now is I was reared by men who lived in houses whose doors were never locked.

Robmo
03-07-2011, 16:56
there was a 'race to the bottom' among producers, lowering their prices to keep or gain share, and cheapening their products in the process. Many distilleries stopped doubling, for example. A very dark age indeed.

Great infomation everyone, thanks for the memories.
Sorry but I'm not familiar with the term "doubling"?

MarkEdwards
03-07-2011, 17:02
Blanton's was around, but it was the only premium bourbon, and was crazy-priced at around $20. For bourbon!

Old Ezra was 15 years old and cost about $15 in its nice wooden box. It was my favorite.

Early Times changed from bourbon to "Kentucky Whiskey" without warning. I just happened to notice the change on the label.

On a non-bourbon note, Laphroaig 10yr was just under $20.

To put these prices into perspective, a loaf of bread was a quarter, with a gallon of gasoline not much higher. A pound of coffee was right in between the cost of bread and gasoline.

Then, in 1972 or thereabouts, prices went crazy. I was a stock boy in a grocery store at the time, and I personally marked up the price of coffee on a daily basis, going from 29 cents to the unheard of price of $1.89 in mere weeks!

I've concluded that bread, coffee and gasoline stay pretty close to the same price...

I was too young to legally buy liquor at the time, so I bought Annie Green Springs and Boone's Farm when I could cadge it. I seem to remember these 'wines' going for about 69 cents a bottle.

tmckenzie
03-07-2011, 17:06
The second distillation. I may be wrong here, and Chuck please correct be if I am, but the thought behind it was to bring it off the beer still at a higher proof and try to avoid having to double. It only went on for a while then they quit. I would imagine it did not age off as quick. The stills that I have seen have a continous doubler. That must not have been the case with the ones who quit doubling.

cowdery
03-09-2011, 12:50
Tom has it right. Distillers tell me that the rise in proof on the second distillation is incidental and it's real purpose is to 'polish' the spirit by removing some of the more stubborn undesirable congeners. Even with continuous doubling not doubling saves money in energy and maintenance costs, although I guess the 'thumper' type of doubler doesn't require additional energy. Most people don't 'thump.' Since conventional doublers require that the distillate be condensed back to a liquid first, you need two condensers in addition to extra energy.

T Comp
05-15-2011, 13:56
And for those that are interested here is a newspaper sales ad for Wilson's Cut Rate Liquors in St. Petersburg, Florida from April 12, 1973 that has 31 bourbons listed under BOURBON and others under FULL QUARTS and 100 PROOF, if you scroll around. Examples of the inflation of prices from 1973 to 2010 are $4.99=$23.25, $5.99=$30.44 and $6.99=$35.52.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=wFdQAAAAIBAJ&sjid=vFcDAAAAIBAJ&pg=4643,3967330&dq=ezra+brooks+from+glenmore&hl=en

flintlock
05-15-2011, 15:19
That's fascinating - thanks for posting it. Maker's is the most expensive bourbon there. Things have definitely improved for the Scotch drinker - but maybe some of those blends were actually really good? Chivas is the most expensive bottle there by far. Interesting.

But maybe the "good old days" weren't so great - it's all just good, straightforward stuff. No premium bottlings, no single barrels. Just workingman's bourbon. Delicious, but not the dizzying array of high end stuff we have now.

I'll take 2 cases of Cabin Still, please. No - make that 3. :bowdown:

Gillman
05-15-2011, 19:08
Great list there from the early 70's, Thad. I was surprised though to see the name "Jim Beam", I thought that term, as a brand name, only came later.

It's true that there were no premium bottlings or single barrels (Maker's Mark being a partial exception due to its particular marketing and image), but in retrospect there was some very high quality on that list: Maker's of course, Ezra Brooks, Benchmark, OGD 86, amongst others. All fine whiskeys.

Gary

cowdery
05-16-2011, 00:04
The Jim Beam brand was launched shortly after Prohibition ended, i.e., 1933 or 34, after the family learned it had lost the rights to Old Tub, their pre-Prohibition brand, darn the luck.

Interesting ad, but now I have this irresistible urge to borrow money from a guy named Mac.

OscarV
05-16-2011, 02:57
I liked the beer ads.
Back then Schlitz was my brand and now I have prrof that it was a real premium beer.
Busch 99 cents a six pack and Schlitz $1.25!!

Gillman
05-16-2011, 07:48
Chuck, I thought I had read that Jim Beam (the two words together) weren't used on the labeling until the 1980's, as opposed say to Beam's Choice or another name with the word Beam only. Am I thinking of something else?

Gary

bourbonv
05-16-2011, 08:49
Gary,
Chuck is correct on Jim Beam white label. I think you are confusing it with Jim Beam Black label that was a later product.

Mike Veach

cowdery
05-16-2011, 10:26
Until the early 90s only two products bore the "Jim Beam" name, Jim Beam white label and Jim Beam rye. They then converted "Beam's Black Label" to Jim Beam Black and "Beam's Choice" to Jim Beam Choice. As Mike said, I think that's what you're remembering, Gary. The white label and rye have had the Jim Beam name on them since the 30s.

Gillman
05-16-2011, 13:29
Okay got it, thanks.

Gary

panchro-press
08-29-2011, 14:13
Back in the '70's, JTS Brown was easily obtained as was Echo Springs. I always thought JTS Brown the better of the two. Echo was frequently the 'well' bourbon in a lot of bars. If you just asked for a bourbon, chances are it would be Echo Springs.

-30-

ratcheer
08-29-2011, 17:27
A couple of things I remember from the 70's haven't been mentioned (or I missed them). Wild Turkey was another premium bottling from Austin-Nichols. And Henry McKenna was definitely available, though I have no idea who made it, then. Has Old Hickory been mentioned? Rebel Yell? A bottom shelf BiB was Virgin Bourbon. Cabin Still?

I am sure there were many others. I loved bourbon in the 70's and there was always more to choose from than I knew what to pick.

Tim

StraightBoston
08-30-2011, 12:40
I'm surprised Chuck didn't mention the pictures in this thread which is one of my favorites (although to be fair it post-dates your request by 20 years!)

Medley/Glenmore products are over-represented (for reasons clear in the thread) but I'm guessing that it looks closer to a 1970s shelf than anything after the glut.

cowdery
08-30-2011, 21:02
I remember the little neighborhood liquor store near me when I first moved to Louisville in 1978. The bourbon 'section' was about 1/3 of the store and I can't begin to name all of the different brands, but I'm sure it was more than 100. Eevery brand was available in at least two proofs, 100 proof bottled-in-bond and something lower. I'm sure I'm looking at it now through rose colored glasses, but boy if I could go back in time to that little store.

For Louisville locals, it was on the north side of Brownsboro Road near Crescent. The store is long gone and I think the building is too.

panchro-press
09-09-2011, 20:43
Another very popular bourbon back then was Bourbon Supreme...almost forgot that one.

-30-

T Comp
09-10-2011, 14:34
Another very popular bourbon back then was Bourbon Supreme...almost forgot that one.
-30-

What do you mean back then? You must not have heard of the Georgia Bourbon Society :lol: .

ethangsmith
09-11-2011, 16:33
Has anyone mentioned Pennco/Michter's products yet?

dave ziegler
09-13-2011, 09:53
I always think back to my trips to the Old High street Pottstown state Store as it was called then. They had a little Wine and Lots of Whiskey Back then. And They had a whole Section for Old Hickory 80 Proof, 86 proof and whatever other Old Hickory was around Like Our BIB. Also right near there was the Hallers County Fair BIB, The Charter Oak BIB and lots of our other Brands of Straights like Planters club 86 and BIB. And if you wanted Blended there was our most Famous one Philadelphia Blended and good old Governors Club. And Our Canadian Whiskey Embassy Club. We had a real big presence then and I loved looking at all the Whiskeys there back then. Today the stores are called Wine and spirites but they might as well call them Wine World!
Dave Z
Kinsey The Unhurried Whiskey For Unhurried Moments

SMOWK
09-13-2011, 10:08
I've seen some old Philadelphia Blended bottles around but haven't payed much attention to them.

shoshani
09-13-2011, 13:27
And Henry McKenna was definitely available, though I have no idea who made it, then.

If I remember correctly, the Henry McKenna brand was purchased by Seagram in the 1940s. The original mashbill, however, stayed with the family descendant who had been making it and who passed away a few years later, and is lost today.

shoshani
09-13-2011, 13:30
But maybe the "good old days" weren't so great - it's all just good, straightforward stuff. No premium bottlings, no single barrels. Just workingman's bourbon. Delicious, but not the dizzying array of high end stuff we have now.

Some would argue (and have, actually) that this is no bargain when viewed at a distance; in order to get the premium bottlings and single barrels we enjoy today, the better distillates have to be held back from the workingman's bourbon.

In theory, the pedestrian bourbon of 40 years ago was better quality than the same bourbon today, in part because it wasn't plundered of its best make for the higher-end expressions.

ratcheer
09-13-2011, 18:26
In theory, the pedestrian bourbon of 40 years ago was better quality than the same bourbon today, in part because it wasn't plundered of its best make for the higher-end expressions.

That makes a lot of sense to me, shoshani. All the bourbons I remember from those days were rich and full-flavored, except for the very low-priced bottom shelf stuff.

Tim

RickF
10-06-2011, 12:24
I grew up in Louisville and graduated from high school in 1970. To address some of the previous questions:

Rebel Yell, Cabin Still, and Old Fitzgerald were all still being made by Stitzel Weller. National Distillers flagship brand was Old-Grand Dad ("the head of the bourbon family"). Yellowstone ("that's right, no bite") was very popular, as were Heaven Hill BIB, Jim Beam (white label), and Ancient Age. Seagram's Benchmark was the one premium bourbon that I remember, but Maker's Mark was the up and coming premium ("tastes expensive, and it is" was the tag line on the billboards).

Jim Beam was known more for its collector bottles than it was for the quality of the bourbon. The last collector bottle I remember was the bicentennial series *1976) with the Norman Rockwell labels. There might have been some after that, but I cannot recall any.

Through the early 70's many Bourbons were still 100 proof and bottled in bond, but that was the time that the proofs started to drop.

LongBeachScott
10-06-2011, 12:51
("tastes expensive, and it is" was the tag line on the billboards).


I always find it funny how plainly stating that a product was expensive was an effective advertising technique in the 70s. While snob appeal has always been, and is still, a big part of advertising, in the 70s a lot of products came right out and claimed expense as a selling point by itself.

cowdery
10-07-2011, 17:52
Part of the context for that Maker's campaign is that the rest of the industry was in a race to the bottom at the time. No one in the industry believed you could sell bourbon with a quality claim. No one even took Maker's seriously. Ultimately, the brand was 'made' by an article in the Wall Street Journal. That WSJ article can also be said to mark the beginning of the present bourbon revival.

The true early history of Maker's is at least as interesting as the legend. Maker's was the last of the independents. People often mistakenly believe small family-owned companies sell out because they've hit a bad financial patch. Usually it's the opposite, they sell out because they can't afford to finance the growth their success has made possible.

The other thing you should know is that they under-promised and over-delivered, but in an almost back-handed way. They said Maker's was expensive, but it wasn't. It was a little higher than most other bourbons but less than most scotch or other things they might be drinking, so most people were prepared for it to be more expensive than it was.

It was a beautiful convergence of skill and luck.

cowdery
10-07-2011, 18:09
I grew up in Louisville and graduated from high school in 1970. To address some of the previous questions:

Rebel Yell, Cabin Still, and Old Fitzgerald were all still being made by Stitzel Weller. National Distillers flagship brand was Old-Grand Dad ("the head of the bourbon family"). Yellowstone ("that's right, no bite") was very popular, as were Heaven Hill BIB, Jim Beam (white label), and Ancient Age. Seagram's Benchmark was the one premium bourbon that I remember, but Maker's Mark was the up and coming premium ("tastes expensive, and it is" was the tag line on the billboards).

Jim Beam was known more for its collector bottles than it was for the quality of the bourbon. The last collector bottle I remember was the bicentennial series *1976) with the Norman Rockwell labels. There might have been some after that, but I cannot recall any.

Through the early 70's many Bourbons were still 100 proof and bottled in bond, but that was the time that the proofs started to drop.

I moved to Louisville in February of 1978 and this is exactly how I remember it.

Buffalo Bill
10-13-2011, 19:21
(Also, what was it like to walk into a bar in the 70s and order a bourbon on the rocks? What was stocked behind the bar?)[/QUOTE]

* I remember during the late 70s out here on Cape Cod being served Beam [White Label] as the all around bourbon. Never saw much in the line of high end bourbon back then but Harper's was always a good choice.

cowdery
10-15-2011, 16:33
It wasn't the Jim-'n-Jack world it is now. There were some national brands but a lot of regional favorites too. Bourbon then had more than twice the share of market it has now, so there would have simply been a lot more American whiskeys on the back bar.

deathevocation
02-12-2012, 03:16
Great thread guys.

fishnbowljoe
02-13-2012, 15:29
When I was in high school, (71-74) there was a small group of us that hung out together. One guy was older, so when we wanted to buy alcohol, he was always the guy that would get stuff for us. I remember that he almost always bought Yellowstone. On the odd occasion Yellowstone wasn't available, he'd buy us Rebel Yell. If I knew then, what I know now....... :crazy:

mosugoji64
02-13-2012, 17:34
When I was in high school, (71-74) there was a small group of us that hung out together. One guy was older, so when we wanted to buy alcohol, he was always the guy that would get stuff for us. I remember that he almost always bought Yellowstone. On the odd occasion Yellowstone wasn't available, he'd buy us Rebel Yell. If I knew then, what I know now....... :crazy:


Truer words have never been spoken ...

deathevocation
02-14-2012, 03:59
Is Yellowstone still available?

Young Blacksmith
02-14-2012, 11:54
Yes it is, usually in handles.

cowdery
02-14-2012, 12:59
Both Yellowstone and Rebel Yell, ironically, are now products of the same company, Luxco. Luxco is a non-distiller producer out of St. Louis. At one time, the Rebel Yell web site said they got their whiskey, at least for Yell, from Heaven Hill. Both were pretty bad the last time I had them. No, check that, Yell was pretty bad, Yellowstone was disgusting.

The old Yell was pretty good, standard Stitzel-Weller wheated bourbon.

Yellowstone used to be pretty good too, made in Shively or Owensboro by Glenmore.

deathevocation
02-14-2012, 14:01
Ah ok. Used to get RY here. Pretty sure I've seen two old bottles of Yellowstone floating around though I don't think it looked too good, especially at the $70 or so price tag (about twice as much as a bottle of Makers or JD here!).

JB64
02-14-2012, 22:09
The whiskeys I remember being available in the Kansas City area were Evan Williams, Jack Daniels, Jim Beam, WT101, Old Forrester, and OGD. Another popular whiskey was McCormick Gold Label. Back then when McCormick was making their own whiskey it was pretty good from what I remember. Unfortunately McCormick hasn't distilled anything for a long time and now sources all of their spirits from other places and most of it is not good. Their products dominate the well spirits around here.

jinenjo
02-18-2012, 20:56
Ultimately, the brand was 'made' by an article in the Wall Street Journal. That WSJ article can also be said to mark the beginning of the present bourbon revival.

Chuck, is this the article published in 1980? (Does anyone know if it's available online? Some preliminary searches yielded nada.) It's a worthy debate, but wouldn't one think that it's a decade or two before the present revival?

cowdery
02-21-2012, 13:58
I think it was 1980. They also manipulated things very well. Much as Woodford Reserve has done, they took pains to get Maker's minis on airlines, targeting business travelers. That in part is what the WSJ article is about. Then they launched a series of humorous, all-text, small-space ads in ... the Wall Street Journal.

But from that point forward, Maker's proved that American whiskey could be sold on quality and could be sold as a contemporary, urban, upscale product, not a country bumpkin like Jack Daniel's. Now we take super-premium bourbons for granted but Maker's proved it was possible, and it only took them 20 years to do it!

Since then, Maker's Mark has grown every year, often by double-digits. Demand has exceeded supply every year for the past 30 years too.

So Maker's started it. A few years later, Blanton's began. Then Booker's and Knob Creek. Then Evan Williams Single Barrel and Woodford Reserve. Then Russell's Reserve started, and Four Roses re-entered the U.S. market, and Barton launched 1792. I'm sure I'm missing a few: Daniel's comes out with Gentleman Jack and Single Barrel, Beam comes out with Black Label, Old Forester does Birthday Bourbon, BT does the antiques, etc. etc., but it all started with Maker's Mark proving that 'premium bourbon' was not an oxymoron.

T Comp
02-21-2012, 18:13
...

So Maker's started it. A few years later, Blanton's began. Then Booker's and Knob Creek. Then Evan Williams Single Barrel and Woodford Reserve. Then Russell's Reserve started, and Four Roses re-entered the U.S. market, and Barton launched 1792. I'm sure I'm missing a few: Daniel's comes out with Gentleman Jack and Single Barrel, Beam comes out with Black Label, Old Forester does Birthday Bourbon, BT does the antiques, etc. etc., but it all started with Maker's Mark proving that 'premium bourbon' was not an oxymoron.

The above paragraph should be the proverbial picture next to the word succinct in the dictionary :Clever: .

weller_tex
03-30-2012, 07:04
I think it was 1980. They also manipulated things very well. Much as Woodford Reserve has done, they took pains to get Maker's minis on airlines, targeting business travelers. That in part is what the WSJ article is about. Then they launched a series of humorous, all-text, small-space ads in ... the Wall Street Journal.

But from that point forward, Maker's proved that American whiskey could be sold on quality and could be sold as a contemporary, urban, upscale product, not a country bumpkin like Jack Daniel's. Now we take super-premium bourbons for granted but Maker's proved it was possible, and it only took them 20 years to do it!

Since then, Maker's Mark has grown every year, often by double-digits. Demand has exceeded supply every year for the past 30 years too.

So Maker's started it. A few years later, Blanton's began. Then Booker's and Knob Creek. Then Evan Williams Single Barrel and Woodford Reserve. Then Russell's Reserve started, and Four Roses re-entered the U.S. market, and Barton launched 1792. I'm sure I'm missing a few: Daniel's comes out with Gentleman Jack and Single Barrel, Beam comes out with Black Label, Old Forester does Birthday Bourbon, BT does the antiques, etc. etc., but it all started with Maker's Mark proving that 'premium bourbon' was not an oxymoron.

Nice succinct history..all you need is some begats in there and you'd have a passage from the Old Testament of Bourbon

weller_tex
05-11-2012, 11:32
Nobody mentioned Weller Special Reserve. I started high school in '78 in Texas and remember Weller ads all over the place. Was that just in Texas? A lot of the ads just said "Weller and Water"..I think I remember one thatcalled it "The After Dinner Bourbon" as well.

weller_tex
05-11-2012, 11:44
Here is the Weller ad I remember..this is from '75.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2199&dat=19751111&id=jtIxAAAAIBAJ&sjid=HuUFAAAAIBAJ&pg=4796,1327653

cowdery
05-11-2012, 15:48
I don't think Weller has ever been a truly national brand, but it's always been big in Texas.

Bourbon Boiler
05-12-2012, 04:57
A co-worker of mine is a big scotch drinker. He recently inherited 3 garage cabinets, 2 full of tools, and 1 full of 1970s-1980s unopened bourbon bottles. He said many were Jim Beam, and he noticed they much different than today's Beam. He thought it had aged in the bottle, until I explained the glut, and aging differences then v. now. He's asked for my help in determining what he has. I'll update this thread with what I learn, as I imagine I'll have some questions and there will be a general curiousity.

weller_tex
05-14-2012, 06:29
I don't think Weller has ever been a truly national brand, but it's always been big in Texas.
Oh, OK, thanks..