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View Full Version : The SB Agave Spirits Thread-- What are you drinking?



boss302
05-11-2011, 20:26
Right now, I'm drinking a Margarita, my own recipe-- 2oz Camarena Reposado Tequila, 0.75oz Combier (the original French Triple SEC), a dash of lime juice, a dash of Simple Syrup, and about 2oz of lemon juice.

I like Tequila Camarena because it is very high quality (100% Blue Weber Agave), very affordable (<$20/bottle), and doesn't use any caramel. They did produce a top-echelon Tequila called "Trago" a while back, but I guess it didn't get any traction. I guess now that Patron has burned everyone out on expensive Tequila, the mid-priced segment is heating up...

I also have a bottle of Siete Leguas Anejo, and a bottle of Ilegal Oaxaca Mezcal Joven. The former is very rich and whiskey-like, whereas the letter is light, but smoky.

DeanSheen
05-11-2011, 20:56
I guess now that Patron has burned everyone out on expensive Tequila, the mid-priced segment is heating up...

Thats great news. I was a big tequila hound till I got sick of the prices. I had fun making pilgrimages to a few bars in LV and NYNY though over the years.

I think my favorite value pour in Ohio is Milagro Reposado. I got pretty burnt out on Anejo's and found myself gravitating more to Reposado's and Blancos.

Of course anything is better than the Two Fingers I cut my teeth on.

boss302
05-11-2011, 21:28
A quick glossary of Agave spirits terms:

Blanco/Plata/Platino/Cristal/Silver-- All terms used to denote a fresh, un-aged Tequila. Straight from the still, cut with water to proof, then bottled.

Reposado-- "Rested" in Oak for at least 2 months, but less than a year.

Anejo-- "Aged" in Oak, usually for a year or more.

Mixto-- Tequila that blends Agave spirits with that of another sugar source, usually sugar cane or maize. Aka- "The Cheap Stuff"

Oro-- "Gold", usually reserved for Mixto Tequilas that have been artificially colored with caramel and artificial oak flavoring in order to mimic an oak-aged Tequila. This would be the cheap gold-colored stuff.

Joven-- "Young", meaning pretty much the same thing as blanco/silver. Whereas Tequila distillers prefer the other terms, Joven is a term adopted primarily by distillers of Sotol or Oaxaca Mezcal.

Tequila-- an Agave spirit distilled from the juice of cooked Blue Agave in a region of the Mexican state of Jalisco, surrounding the city of Tequila.

Mezcal-- Originally a term used for virtually all Agave spirits, the term now denotes specific spirits distilled in the Oaxaca region of Mexico. They are distilled from the Agave Americana (also called Agave Espadin) plant, which is different from the Agave Tequilana, or Blue Agave used in Tequila, but the basic structure of the plant is the same. Whereas the "heart" of the plant is cooked in an oven to make Tequila, Oaxaca Mezcal uses covered fire pits dug into the earth, giving the spirit a smoky flavor.

Sotol-- Distilled from a desert plant called "Desert Spoon", technically an evergreen shrub, not an Agave. But, the plant is harvested and distilled in a similar manner-- the flowering portions are removed, leaving the juicy, fibrous core. Sotol is produced primarily in the Chihuahua region of Mexico.

Note: I'll edit this to include more terms as questions arise

boss302
05-11-2011, 21:38
Thats great news. I was a big tequila hound till I got sick of the prices. I had fun making pilgrimages to a few bars in LV and NYNY though over the years.

I think my favorite value pour in Ohio is Milagro Reposado. I got pretty burnt out on Anejo's and found myself gravitating more to Reposado's and Blancos.

Of course anything is better than the Two Fingers I cut my teeth on.

I've noticed that a couple of former Mixtos are now 100% Agave Tequilas-- El Jimador, the budget companion brand to Herradura, comes to mind. So does Cazadores (the one with the stag on it). Both have gone upward in price a bit and are now in the mid-priced segment. El Jimador, in particular, used to be just a couple of bucks more than Sauza or Jose Cuervo.

Not that I'm complaining-- I don't buy mixtos, and I'm glad to see more affordable 100% Agave tequilas coming into the market.

kickert
05-11-2011, 21:43
Lunazul repesado

DeanSheen
05-11-2011, 22:42
I used to like Cazadores quite a bit. Then one day I was drinking the Reposado straight and got wild onions. And I tried it a few more times and the flavor persisted.

I used to drive tractor quite a bit and when you ran into a few acres where wild onions were persistent you got sick of the smell real quick.

I still think it's a great tequila for drinks. I just don't like it straight anymore.

Virus_Of_Life
05-11-2011, 23:15
A quick glossary of Agave spirits terms:

Blanco/Plata/Platino/Cristal/Silver-- All terms used to denote a fresh, un-aged Tequila. Straight from the still, cut with water to proof, then bottled.

Reposado-- "Rested" in Oak for at least 2 months, but less than a year.

Anejo-- "Aged" in Oak, usually for a year or more.

Mixto-- Tequila that blends Agave spirits with that of another sugar source, usually sugar cane or maize. Aka- "The Cheap Stuff"

Oro-- "Gold", usually reserved for Mixto Tequilas that have been artificially colored with caramel and artificial oak flavoring in order to mimic an oak-aged Tequila. This would be the cheap gold-colored stuff.

Joven-- "Young", meaning pretty much the same thing as blanco/silver. Whereas Tequila distillers prefer the other terms, Joven is a term adopted primarily by distillers of Sotol or Oaxaca Mezcal.

Tequila-- an Agave spirit distilled from the juice of cooked Blue Agave in a region of the Mexican state of Jalisco, surrounding the city of Tequila.

Mezcal-- Originally a term used for virtually all Agave spirits, the term now denotes specific spirits distilled in the Oaxaca region of Mexico. They are distilled from the Agave Americana (also called Agave Espadin) plant, which is different from the Agave Tequilana, or Blue Agave used in Tequila, but the basic structure of the plant is the same. Whereas the "heart" of the plant is cooked in an oven to make Tequila, Oaxaca Mezcal uses covered fire pits dug into the earth, giving the spirit a smoky flavor.

Sotol-- Distilled from a desert plant called "Desert Spoon", technically an evergreen shrub, not an Agave. But, the plant is harvested and distilled in a similar manner-- the flowering portions are removed, leaving the juicy, fibrous core. Sotol is produced primarily in the Chihuahua region of Mexico.

Note: I'll edit this to include more terms as questions arise

I hate to nitpick, but if we're going to talk about terms we should be exact, so just a couple points. Not ALL Plata/Blanco are "straight from the still" Gran Centenario and Herradura are two which are aged for a short period of time, can't recall exactly but 45 days for Herradura and 28 for GC rings a bell. Anejo is a MINIMUM of one year.

Honestly Mixtos aren't even worth talking about, you can find 100% agave for the same price just about everywhere now, and if you're starting with mixtos you're likely never going to appreciate tequila. I used to drink Cuervo Gold like water then burnt out on it and couldn't touch tequila for about 3 years. It's is similar enough to make you fear real tequila if you don't like it, but if you do, move along quickly and appreciate how good 100% agave is.

I recently bought a bottle of Milagro Silver because it was on sale for $23, but it definitely isn't at the top of my list; tried a little again tonight and needs a squeeze of lime.

cowdery
05-11-2011, 23:30
Tequila is very sensitive to the agricultural cycle because the blue agave must be grown in the designated Tequila region and the plant takes 8 to 12 years to mature. A few years ago there was an agave shortage. Now there is an agave glut. So by all means, there is no reason to buy anything except 100% agave. I like El Jimador, 1800, and Hornitos, Herradura when I'm feeling flush. I've had a lot of the expensive ones. They're perfectly good too, but no better.

I like tequila but I just don't feel it has the nuances whiskey has. Same with rum. They're great, but whiskey and brandy are on a different level.

callmeox
05-12-2011, 05:16
I have grown an inerest and a taste for anejo tequilas. I have a Cuervo reserva and an 1921 special reserve queued up for this summer and I'm impatiently waiting for the warmer weather.

Where Cleveland is lacking in bourbon bars, there are a couple of tequila joints with very wide selections which makes sampling before buying very easy.

B.B. Babington
05-12-2011, 20:04
...I think my favorite value pour in Ohio is Milagro Reposado. I got pretty burnt out on Anejo's and found myself gravitating more to Reposado's and Blancos...I tend to gravitate toward anejo, but I've read several places that aficionados south of the border prefer more robust blanco.

DeanSheen
05-12-2011, 20:10
I tend to gravitate toward anejo, but I've read several places that aficionados south of the border prefer more robust blanco.

Black Pepper goodness.

White Dog
05-12-2011, 22:27
Nice thread! I was drinking whiskey tonight, but after coming across this I poured some Del Maguey Tobala.

Tobala is Oaxacan Mezcal made not from the typical Espadin, but rather wild, mountain-grown Agave that may only be harvested once a year. With wild grown agave, the pinas are about a third the size of the pinas of farmed agave. The flavors are off the charts compared to farm grown, IMHO.

Love this thread. Outside of Whiskey, Mezcal is what I reach for most.

wadewood
05-12-2011, 23:01
couple of articles worth reading about the current state of Tequila manufacturing:

http://www.29-95.com/restaurants/story/houstons-paul-revere-tequila

and the attached .pdf

boss302
05-12-2011, 23:19
couple of articles worth reading about the current state of Tequila manufacturing:

http://www.29-95.com/restaurants/story/houstons-paul-revere-tequila

and the attached .pdf

I don't agree with them 100%, but they are definitely well-written and gave me a good chuckle.

Interesting point about the agricultural practices with Agave, though, especially with the recent Agave crop shortage about a decade back. What if disease hits?

I'm glad to see that I am justified in my choice of tequila-- Siembra Azul and Siete Leguas. I'd love to try Tequila Ocho, but I can't get any in PA.

Well, if Tequila does get too over-done... there is always Mezcal and Sotol.

DeanSheen
05-13-2011, 09:02
couple of articles worth reading about the current state of Tequila manufacturing:

http://www.29-95.com/restaurants/story/houstons-paul-revere-tequila

and the attached .pdf

Man Bobby is pissed. Thanks for the links.

cowdery
05-13-2011, 09:08
He's perhaps a little quick to lay all of the practices he decries at the feet of the big, international spirits companies, always an easy target. As I understand it, many of these practices are home-grown. I haven't done a Tequila tour but I've heard about this stuff from people who have, about industrial enzymes and other chemicals used to enhance conversion, etc. I wish tequila experts would write more about individual producers and their practices since talking about brands is largely useless. Many if not most of the brands sold in the U.S. are not associated with a particular distillery.

SBOmarc
05-13-2011, 09:18
Sipped some La Familia from Cuervo last night. This was uber expensive when it firat came out and the bottle still goes for $80 plus. Luckily this bottle was a gift.

It is candy in a glass as far as tequila goes.

timd
05-13-2011, 13:28
Interesting info - first I've heard of Sotol.

I'll pick some up this weekend and give it a shot... doesn't taste like Gin, does it? Any specific brands or expressions to look out for?

wadewood
05-13-2011, 16:35
He's perhaps a little quick to lay all of the practices he decries at the feet of the big, international spirits companies, always an easy target. As I understand it, many of these practices are home-grown. I haven't done a Tequila tour but I've heard about this stuff from people who have, about industrial enzymes and other chemicals used to enhance conversion, etc. I wish tequila experts would write more about individual producers and their practices since talking about brands is largely useless. Many if not most of the brands sold in the U.S. are not associated with a particular distillery.

Chuck, I think Bobby did address this in the comments area of his blog post that the pdf came from, this is what Bobby posted; http://drinkdogma.com/bobbys-cinco-de-mayo-menu/:


Wade – I am going back to Mexico again in June, and I plan to go back at least once this year after that. I am extremely interested in generating a table that clarifies as many producers’ profiles on the following issues so that we can make more informed purchases:

-Agave sourcing
-The use of autoclaves vs. hornos
-The use of diffusers vs. other traditional methods
-The use of additives or chemicals
-The fermentation process
-Distillation techniques
-Ownership
-Marketing and packaging procedures

Yes, Alison’s article only mentioned three brands because these are the only brands available in Texas that really can claim to be making the right decisions on the above issues. There are others still making good tequila, Herradura (now under Brown-Foreman ownership) is a good example – they use a diffuser without additives and have been doing so a few years prior to heir acquisition. I haven’t been to Herradura, and I don’t think it was as good as it once was, but overall, I think they still remain generally committed to traditions – at least for the time being. Partida would be another example of a producer that generally follows quality-driven guidelines for production, but their use of autoclaves (though they do roast for longer periods) is something that is never going to jive well with me.

The bottom-line here is that large brands of tequila don’t necessarily constitute entirely bad brands of tequila, but there are very few examples, if any, that indicate that a larger corporate takeover has not interfered with the quality of the tequila produced. The big issue, however, is that it just isn’t feasible for big business, regardless of how religiously devoted they remain to quality, to sell tequila at levels equivalent to spirits produced from agricultural crops with annual growth cycles. I don’t care who you are. It is time to reconsider what tequila will mean to us in the future because it cannot be sold in large quantities and still exist in the same way it once did.

I used to advocate El Tesoro as well, but over the last year I’ve been hearing some very disturbing things about that brand – moreso than normal. If these rumors are true, I don’t think it will be something that maintains any level of quality going forward. Maybe they will surprise us, but everything I am hearing now suggests that all decisions about quality are being made by the folks you don’t want making those decisions. I’d stock up on old stuff around town if I were you.

timd
05-13-2011, 16:58
What's the richest, earthiest, smokiest Mezcal? Given I love spicy rye and the peatier/smokier the better on my Scotch - what should I look for in Mezcal that I might get a bang out of.

If Thomas Handy, Four Roses Single Barrel, and Ardbeg Uigadale/Laphroaigh Cask Strength are my favorite offerings among the "browns" as it were, what might I like in a mezcal, sotol or even tequila?

cowdery
05-13-2011, 23:38
Sombra is a good, smoky, single village mezcal.

cowdery
05-13-2011, 23:47
Wade,

Give BF a chance with Herradura. The Herradura family sold to BF because they wanted another family-run company. BF has said they're not looking to change anything at the distillery. Their emphasis is on marketing it better up here. I have also heard from independent sources that Herradura is one of the more highly regarded producers.

I've met the people behind Partida. They're very nice people but they're marketing people and it's a new operation, so I'd want to know more about the history of the place they bought. While I think the product is very good, it doesn't knock me out for the price.

As Terry Sullivan once famously said about a new vodka, "it's filtered through the hair of 1,000 Polish virgins." There may have been an additional word modifying "hair," I don't remember. :)

And I just realized (after I looked at his blog) that your last post was quoting Bobby.

Companies will do what customers show them they value. To this point, tequila customers have mostly responded to shiny objects and unsubstantiated quality claims supported primarily by high prices. Why? Because, as with most things, they're unwilling to do the work to actually learn something.

White Dog
05-13-2011, 23:52
What's the richest, earthiest, smokiest Mezcal? Given I love spicy rye and the peatier/smokier the better on my Scotch - what should I look for in Mezcal that I might get a bang out of.

If Thomas Handy, Four Roses Single Barrel, and Ardbeg Uigadale/Laphroaigh Cask Strength are my favorite offerings among the "browns" as it were, what might I like in a mezcal, sotol or even tequila?

I agree with Chuck on the Sombra, and also Del Maguey San Luis del Rio, and Los Nahuales Blanco.

unclebunk
05-14-2011, 18:32
El Tesoro's entire line are winners in my book. I love their reposado and anejo, but even their blanco (which they call "platinum") is outstanding!

ThomasH
05-14-2011, 21:58
For a summertime tequila drink, I like Cuervo Black Medallion, diet pepsi and a slice of lime. I'm not at all into magaritas, they give me a sour stomach!

Thomas

BFerguson
05-15-2011, 11:57
Wade,

Give BF a chance with Herradura. The Herradura family sold to BF because they wanted another family-run company. BF has said they're not looking to change anything at the distillery. Their emphasis is on marketing it better up here. I have also heard from independent sources that Herradura is one of the more highly regarded producers.



Agreed. I got to sample a Reposado from them yesterday that was bottled special for a local store. After its regular barrel time, it got a secondary short term aging in a new toasted barrel.

I never have been too much of a fan of tequila, and granted, haven't had a huge sampling of different varieties, but man, this really was a eye opener. :shocked: Amazingly good. A candidate for sipping neat, it would be a shame to mix it with anything.

I know it will be around there for awhile, and might have to go and get one.

B

timd
05-15-2011, 20:25
Picked up a bottle of Hacienda De Chihuahua Sotol Plata - it's alright. $20 at Goody Goody. It tastes a bit like Camarena, but nowhere near as smooth.

I'd almost describe it as Gin like - lots of botanical effects, but without the headache (for me) inducing qualities of the Gin odor.

Lower proof than I'm used to (76) and for being clear, it's mighty flavorful and tasty. It's bitter to be sure, and a bit earthy, metallic & smokey. I'll sip it again tonight - but first blush reaction was it's quite a bit better than the majority of Tequilas I've had even at 2x-3x the price.

Unique, but clearly in the Tequila family!

FWIW: Hacienda De Chihuahua appears to be the only brand available in North Texas. Anybody know of any others? I'll likely grab a Resposado or Anejo of the Hacienda - depending on suggestions from you kind folks.

cowdery
05-16-2011, 01:17
76 proof Tequila? Not in these United States. It has to be at least 80. I'm not saying you don't have a bottle of something that's 76 proof, it's just not Tequila.

(If you bought it outside the U.S., all bets are off.)

boss302
05-16-2011, 03:18
76 proof Tequila? Not in these United States. It has to be at least 80. I'm not saying you don't have a bottle of something that's 76 proof, it's just not Tequila.

(If you bought it outside the U.S., all bets are off.)

It's not Tequila, it's Sotol-- different plant, probably different rules, but I don't know about the latter statement for sure...

timd
05-16-2011, 12:15
76 proof Tequila? Not in these United States. It has to be at least 80. I'm not saying you don't have a bottle of something that's 76 proof, it's just not Tequila.

(If you bought it outside the U.S., all bets are off.)

It's not Tequila - it's Sotol. It's 38%, or 76 proof.

It's still good, but lighter on alcohol than I'd like. Not watery at all - just not as potent as I'd prefer

fussychicken
05-16-2011, 22:15
I've had quite a bit of trouble going back to good Tequilas after getting hooked on good Mezcal. As most of us bourbonites are suckers for a big flavor, you should try out a Del Maguey Mezcal or the like. A whole lot more going on in the glass compared to pretty much every Tequila I've had.

cowdery
05-16-2011, 22:40
You never have to go far to trip over Sazerac. Hacienda De Chihuahua Sotol is a Sazerac product, through its Gemini division. Still can't explain how it's 38% ABV. Either it's not for sale in the U.S. or it's not a straight spirit and is instead some kind of 'distilled spirit specialty.'

Del Maguey Mezcal is also Gemini.

tmckenzie
05-17-2011, 19:23
Has anybody had agavales anejo tequila? 100 percent blue agave for 13 bucks a liter here. I was leary because of the price, but I got it anyway. Boy was I pleased. Better than the stuff 3 times the price. Great straight or in a mixed drink. I have had sotol and it is great. One interesting note is the best tequila and the best sugar, sour corn based white lightning from south alabama and south missisippi taste almost identical. I think that is must be the use of wild yeast.

unclebunk
05-18-2011, 08:00
Hornitos with Mexican food last night. Nothing fancy--just good, old fashioned tequila the way your (Mexican friend's) grandfather drank it.

wadewood
05-18-2011, 16:39
I decided to stock up on 7 Leguas Blanco; bought a 6 pack for $123.

etohchem
05-18-2011, 18:01
just to follow Chuck Siete Leguas is Gemini/Sazerac also.

timd
05-18-2011, 18:33
Bought a bottle of Real de Jalpa Reposado Mezcal ($20 and recommended by the manager - a Tequila buff). It's not bad... A good buy, all things considered.

Nice flavors, good balance, nice smoke & some fruit, too. I think I prefer Reposodos and Anejos, however - could be the whisk(e)y buff in me looking for those wood influences to round it out, the silvers I've had have left me wanting more... so far.

Brisko
06-02-2011, 14:00
Can any Minnesota SBers recommend a liquor store with a decent selection? Specifcally for mezcals... I see Monte Alban and precious little else.

Fortunately decent tequila is not that hard to come by.

timd
06-10-2011, 17:15
Could be the whisk(e)y buff in me looking for those wood influences to round it out, the silvers I've had have left me wanting more... so far.
I agree - I need the oak, vanilla and tannins to get the most out of my booze.

To that end, I recently picked up a repasado and am aging it further in my own heavily charred mini-barrel to see what comes out!

Given that soooo much of the whisk(e)y flavor comes from wood, I have to think that Tequila would do equally as well further aged... but then again, why isn't somebody already doing "aged Tequila" if that's true?

Oh well, worst case I get some nice, woody, smooth tequila - and then some neat tequila after-flavors to finish a bourbon or something in...?

Josh
06-16-2011, 18:33
Enjoying some Cuervo Anejo I picked up a couple yrs. ago. It's the hand-blown bottle with the wax seal and the cork hanging off the side (at least before I opened it). I came across a stash of these a while ago. Probably shoulda picked up more.

jasonh
07-26-2011, 18:16
I agree - I need the oak, vanilla and tannins to get the most out of my booze.

To that end, I recently picked up a repasado and am aging it further in my own heavily charred mini-barrel to see what comes out!

Given that soooo much of the whisk(e)y flavor comes from wood, I have to think that Tequila would do equally as well further aged... but then again, why isn't somebody already doing "aged Tequila" if that's true?

Oh well, worst case I get some nice, woody, smooth tequila - and then some neat tequila after-flavors to finish a bourbon or something in...?

They are already doing aged tequila, it's called anejo (aged more than 1 year) and extra anejo (aged more than 3 years). Generally, you don't see much tequila aged more than 5 years, as tequila ages very quickly and has a much higher angel's share compared to whiskey when aged for the same period.

Brands that I would recommend:
El Tesoro
Casa Noble
Siete Leguas
Fortaleza
Siembra Azul

The last two are fairly new, both produced by people that care. In fact, Fortaleza refuses to increase production, even though the demand is high, as they don't want quality to suffer. I haven't had the ocho, but have constantly heard good things about it.

Most of the new expensive brands on the market should be avoided. They're just marketing-crazed inferior products like vodka. If are a lot of decent cheap 100% agave brands out there under $30, but they are brands you have never heard of before. But they are not all good, so try to stick to those you have never heard of.

Lastly, in my opinion, old classics like Herradura, Chinaco, Gran Centenario, and Don Julio have pushed production to such a degree that the quality is inconsistent and I wouldn't trust picking up a bottle of any of these.

cbus
09-16-2011, 22:48
Had some of the KAH day of the dead blanco tequila. First time I've really had tequila by itself and not mixed into some kind of cocktail. I enjoyed it quite a bit.

ILLfarmboy
09-28-2011, 08:39
Last night was taco night.......had a couple margaritas made with Hurrradura reposado..... 2-1-1 formula

I realy wish I could find El Tesoro around here. When I do, at one particular HY-Vee, the blanco is priced at fifty bux the same price as the Anejo (what's up with that?). And the last time I went down to Peoria, Frier Tucks didn't have any of their line.

timd
10-03-2011, 08:56
I recently had some Del Maguey Chichicapa - wow was it good.

Set out on a quest to find some - with no luck so far, but in the process I discovered - and picked up a bottle of - Sombra.

Not as over the top smokey as Del Maguey (which could give just about any Islay Scotch a run for its money), but close - a more subdued smoke, but a bigger, more robust flavor to go along with it.

Here locally it's about $35, half the price of the Del Maguey I was after - and honestly, it's nearly as good - or maybe just as good? I see the retail price is supposed to be closer to $50, however - but it's still a good buy at that point.

Very spicey - lots of black pepper bite, a citrus/mint-type component (basil or even cilantro?), maybe some charred metal or burned earth, and a nice mesquite-smoke finish, with some smoke throughout (on the nose, palate also, but strongest on the finish).

I haven't mixed it with anything yet - just drinking it straight. It's 45%, which is nice, a little splash/drop of water helps open it up and enhances the smoke.

Anybody else try Sombra and have thoughts?

fitzharry
10-25-2011, 14:40
I am drinking some Monte Alban Mezcal today.

This is actually not a bad mezcal at all, despite a lot of reviews on the net comparing it to diesel fuel. Tastings.com gave it a score of 85 and after drinking it for a couple weeks I'm inclined to agree that it is not bad...at all. Along with some Cointreau, it also makes a delicious Oaxacan margarita, or "smoky rita," as I call them.

It's 100% agave with a slight golden color. The nose is very smoky and the taste is quite nice, a bit salty perhaps but overall a very creamy mouthfeel. It goes very well with carnitas, enchiladas, frijoles and other Tex-Mex specialties, cutting the greasiness of Tex-Mex cuisine but not being out-of-place with the food.

Overall, a nice drink without the expense of the higher-quality (and more expensive) single village mezcals.

timd
10-25-2011, 14:47
Last night at a local watering hole (shout out to The Whiskey Cake) I had an outstanding drink:

Muddle Red Bell Pepper (made nearly an ounce of "juice") and muddled/slapped Basil that was strained so no "bits" got in
A big squirt of Agave Syrup
Lemon Juice
Muddled slice of Jalapeno pepper
Smacked Basil leaves
Big shot of Sombra Mescal

Mouth-watering and savory - really great drink. The jalapeno slice put it over the top in terms of "mmmmm" - but even without it was still great.

Poor bartender probably put his arm out muddling all the bell pepper, but had the idea that perhaps a few drops of concentrated beef bullion would help it get more punch? I'm not sure, but it's a neat idea... however, it was quite good as-is.

Really good - highly recommend it!

Brisko
10-26-2011, 09:41
I am drinking some Monte Alban Mezcal today.

This is actually not a bad mezcal at all, despite a lot of reviews on the net comparing it to diesel fuel. Tastings.com gave it a score of 85 and after drinking it for a couple weeks I'm inclined to agree that it is not bad...at all. Along with some Cointreau, it also makes a delicious Oaxacan margarita, or "smoky rita," as I call them.

It's 100% agave with a slight golden color. The nose is very smoky and the taste is quite nice, a bit salty perhaps but overall a very creamy mouthfeel. It goes very well with carnitas, enchiladas, frijoles and other Tex-Mex specialties, cutting the greasiness of Tex-Mex cuisine but not being out-of-place with the food.

Overall, a nice drink without the expense of the higher-quality (and more expensive) single village mezcals.

I'm a big fan of Monte Alban, if for no other reason than it is widely available and reasonably priced. It is pretty good for what it is, I think.

White Dog
10-28-2011, 19:55
Last night at a local watering hole (shout out to The Whiskey Cake) I had an outstanding drink:

Muddle Red Bell Pepper (made nearly an ounce of "juice") and muddled/slapped Basil that was strained so no "bits" got in
A big squirt of Agave Syrup
Lemon Juice
Muddled slice of Jalapeno pepper
Smacked Basil leaves
Big shot of Sombra Mescal

Mouth-watering and savory - really great drink. The jalapeno slice put it over the top in terms of "mmmmm" - but even without it was still great.

Poor bartender probably put his arm out muddling all the bell pepper, but had the idea that perhaps a few drops of concentrated beef bullion would help it get more punch? I'm not sure, but it's a neat idea... however, it was quite good as-is.

Really good - highly recommend it!

Sounds interesting, although I'm shocked by the use of lemon rather than lime.

sob0728
03-12-2012, 10:07
don abraham anejo. it's the stuff.

Ejmharris
03-12-2012, 18:12
Tequila ocho respado


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