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Gillman
07-02-2011, 13:08
Sometimes, only two bourbons will combine in a particularly good way. I bought recently 4 pints of Woerner's Kentucky Straight Bourbon, a 4 year old (or more) private label out of San Francisco from 30 years ago. Each of these is slightly different. I took one, flavourful but almost too smooth, and combined it 50/50 with some current Old Fitzgerald 1849. The Fitz has good cereal and other flavours but is a little prickly on the palate.

The combination makes the Fitz glycerine smooth but adds its wheaty accents. A four grain perfect for neat sipping sans ice.

I'd be interested in any other successful two bourbon (and/or rye) vattings.

Gary

emr454
07-02-2011, 18:31
Gary,

I don't have any successful vatting stories yet, but I was wondering if you could give me some suggestions for vattings from the following whiskeys:

OGD114
EWB
Ritt BiB
Bulleit Rye
CC sherry cask
Jameson

Eric

mosugoji64
07-02-2011, 22:26
I recently had some good luck vatting FC with HH Old Style Green Label. The FC, as most of you know, is a good, but very powerful pour on it's own while the HH is thin but would be good at a higher proof. Together, they made for a solid combination that displayed a sweetness not apparent in either one alone.

macdeffe
07-02-2011, 23:59
It's not easy. The few times I tried vatting bourbons/ryes or malt whisky, the result was rather terrible

I tried vatting Whistlepig with something more woody, didnt taste any good

Steffen

Gillman
07-03-2011, 04:29
Oh vatting is easy with a little practice, keep trying! The FC and green label HH sound perfect, perfect logic.

For vatting the whiskies suggested:

Jameson and CC Sherry cask. Irish whiskey often is sherry barrel aged. Jameson can benefit from a little sherry, e.g. Jameson 15 has lots evidently, and the CC is mainly high proof neutral-type distillate except aged, so you would be reducing the pot still element of the Jameson (which not everyone likes, that minty/petrol effect) and softening the blend with some rich sherry. Say 4:1 Jameson to CC.

Bulleit and Rittenhouse rye should make a very good rye vatting. Maybe 2:1 Ritt to the Bulleit, or half half. A touch blending agent may help, a dash of Southern Comfort from a mini, say. EWSB tends to be relatively smooth and even bland sometimes, adding up to 1/3 OGD 114 may be a good mix. Half half should work very well too.

American straights are in general closer in palate amongst them than the malts or Irish whiskey. You can't go wrong really with almost any combination (e.g. it's not Budweiser and Cola!) but some work hand in glove and those are the ones to seek.

Gary

emr454
07-03-2011, 06:07
Thanks for the suggestions, Gary. I will probably try a couple of them tonight and see how they work out.

Eric

Enoch
07-03-2011, 07:58
Because I ended up with a number of handles of Charter 101 and Four Roses Yellow, I vatted them 1:1 and produced a nice blend. The FR cut the sweet of the Charter.

emr454
07-03-2011, 18:25
The Ritt BiB/Bulleit rye mix is a good one. The extra kick of the 100 proof Rittenhouse gives the Bulleit what its missing; a nice finish.

Alone, the Bulleit seems to have a short, unimpressive finish. That's my only complaint with this rye. I guess I was hoping for more spice from a 95% rye mashbill.

Eric

sutton
07-04-2011, 04:11
I vatted 60/40 HH OFitz BiB and JPS 17. While I liked the Old Fitz I found it a bit one-dimensional, somewhat short, and thin, and as a result, a tad hot. The JPS added body, spice and wood notes, rounding out and lengthening the finish. I actually think this might be even better at 70/30 or 80/20 as the JPS really took over -

_______________
Mark

Ian S.
07-05-2011, 19:19
I've been doing a 50/50 vatting of Weller 12 and OWA for quite a while now. I get the extra aging that I miss in the OWA and the extra proof that I wish the Weller 12 had. It's a perfect Weller.

G.H.Adams
07-05-2011, 19:52
Does it count if the vatting is done in my stomach?:slappin:

AaronWF
07-06-2011, 20:18
I've been experimenting with WSR and OWA since I bought the new Binny's bottling of WSR. It's pretty much a no-brainer, but it seems that at 3:5 of OWA to WSR is hitting a sweet spot for me. Binny's WSR, while balanced in all categories, lacks character. The OWA adds the character in proof, and the blend has a wooden cherry effect that is quite pleasing to me.

On a normal day I'm not a big fan of OWA either. Again, nothing much to affront, but nothing much other than a wheaty heat to keep me coming back. This vatting is finally bringing out something I can like in a 7-year wheater, and it's a barely ripe cherry meat with a bit of wood in it. I would even say it's reminding me vaguely of an immature Pappy15 or even 20.

Parkersback
07-07-2011, 03:36
That sounds good, Aaron. I've done a little vatting with the Weller line and always thought there's certainly some good discoveries to be made there. I've had half a mind to go in to my liquor store & grab a 750 each of WSR, OWA and Weller 12 and just combine all three and see what happens.

I mean, it certainly couldn't be bad. I think it'd have to fall somewhere between good and excellent.

Brisko
07-15-2011, 09:46
I tried both a 2:1 and 4:1 of HH BiB (gold label) and McKenna SB BiB (10 y/o) given that they are both HH and the same proof. Interestingly both whiskeys are sweet on their own (the HH is corny, the McKenna shows more barrel-influenced sweetness). When vatted together the sweetness of each is subdued but not necessarily in a bad way. At 2:1 the the 10 year old contributes some woody notes that aren't as noticeable on its own.

I found 4:1 to be just right: it retains the easy drinking vitality of the 4 year old without being overly tannic or astringent, but with just the right amount of maturity and complexity from the 10 year old. For someone who doesn't care for overly sweet bourbons, this vatting would be especially appealing. I like the sweetness of the constituents but it's a nice change of pace.

Gillman
07-15-2011, 13:04
The 4:1 sounds very good, makes a lot of sense.

Gary

Gillman
08-22-2011, 05:12
Something I think I haven't done before is what I dubbed The Tennessee Waltz - JD and Dickel 50/50. The JDs were actually three, two SBs, one was Silver Select, and Jack Black. The Dickels were a black and beige label from the early 80's. The light powdered charcoal scents blended well. The Jack profile tends to be bigger than George's, and kind of absorbed the latter, but it is all very good. Admission: feeling it needed a touch of tannic age, I added a dash of EC 12 to it, so there is a Kentucky musician shall we say in this Tennessee band.

A very nice blending of elements, some of this may come with me to Bardstown soon.

Gary

Brisko
10-14-2011, 06:22
Not two-Bourbon, per se, but I tried a roughly 1:1 combination of Old Forester Signature and Beam rye, and was quite pleasantly surprised. This bottle of OF is a little tannic, with some toasty bitterness that overshadows its underlying maple-sugary sweetness. The Beam rye, while not a world-beater, is decent enough for what it is, but it has that well-known Beaminess that a lot of people don't care for.

Together, they cover each others faults quite flawlessly. The vatting takes on a hard candy sweetness balanced by tinges of piney and pickle barrel notes from the rye, and has just the right balance of wood to create a soothingly dry finish. Maybe the biggest gain is that it takes on a rounder, thicker mouthfeel. If anything, this vatting tastes very much like a straight rye, not unlike Baby Saz, though with a rounder mouthfeel. In fact the nose is reminiscent of Saz 18, though obviously much younger.

Anyway, a winner in my book-- far better than either on its own.

Gillman
10-26-2011, 16:35
Excellent, good notes, thanks for this.

Gary

steeltownbbq
11-02-2011, 17:56
Not sure this constitutes vatting, but I've been pouring the last 2 to 4 ounces of every bottle I finish into a decanter in what has become a mini solara. I enjoy the ever changing (and never bad) character of the resulting mixture.

Gillman
11-02-2011, 19:30
It is vatting, for sure. I do something similar and it is never bad, often excellent.

Gary

mosugoji64
02-19-2012, 08:16
Bumping this thread to share my latest success. Had bottles of OF BB '10 and JB Devil's Cut that we're languishing on the shelf. Neither was bad, but each was missing something. The OF had ample corn sweetness with a nice rye backbone but little between to balance the two. The DC had a nice, oakey presence but was thin for 90 proof and lacked a strong finish. A 1:1 combo proved to be a good fix for both providing the "middle" the OF lacked and the overall body missing in the DC. I had two ample pours of that last night and it held up very well. I poured the remainder of the mix into the DC bottle, which also allowed me to get rid of that attractive-but-awkward OF bottle!
Happy vatting, everyone!

jtexaslonestar
02-19-2012, 13:23
Bumping this thread to share my latest success. Had bottles of OF BB '10 and JB Devil's Cut that we're languishing on the shelf. Neither was bad, but each was missing something. The OF had ample corn sweetness with a nice rye backbone but little between to balance the two. The DC had a nice, oakey presence but was thin for 90 proof and lacked a strong finish. A 1:1 combo proved to be a good fix for both providing the "middle" the OF lacked and the overall body missing in the DC. I had two ample pours of that last night and it held up very well. I poured the remainder of the mix into the DC bottle, which also allowed me to get rid of that attractive-but-awkward OF bottle!
Happy vatting, everyone!

Just started reading these vatting threads and i happen to have a pour of OF BB 08 remaining and a mini of DC. I will surely try this out. Thanks!!

Bmac
02-20-2012, 06:36
I started a vatting experiment a while back and found success using the following formula:

Pick a whiskey/bourbon you want as the core. That becomes 50% of the whiskey. It's akin to being the neutral grain whiskey in a scotch blend. So i tend to choose young whiskeys. It would be a good excuse to release all the Rebel Yell you might have ;).

Then pick The two ( or more) whiskeys to flavor it. You can mix them in any ratio to make up the remaining 50%

Another factor to take into consideration is the addition of water to balance the proof...if like me, you've mixed a cask strength or high proof whiskey.

Then, let it sit a week to marry.

I made a few reasonable sipping blends. My latest blend is a mixture of all wheat bourbons with Berhiem Original and Rebel Reserve as the core. The rest is small doses of Weller and Van Winkle product.

ckgdrums
02-24-2012, 07:21
Being new here, I was hesitant to post this, but I tried a little combo of my own last night. I had a bottle of Weller's Special Reserve, and an almost empty bottle of Woodford Reserve.

I mixed them 2 parts Weller's to 1 part WR, and it came out really nice. May have to try that again.

Lazer
03-12-2012, 09:57
My first successful combo, EWB and WTRB. 2:1 EW:RB. It was amazing. They really worked together.

JayMonster
03-14-2012, 19:43
Wasn't sure which way to go with this, so I took several small bottles and vatted a combination of Woodford Reserve Distiller's Select (nice taste, awful finish) and Devil's Cut (lots of Oak, lacking in depth) in ratios of 1:1 2:1 and 1:2.

Hopefully there will be the right balance in one of those.

Gillman
03-15-2012, 05:08
Interesting approach and the right combination may well work. I'd try also a wheater with them, with the WR and DC being a kind of seasoning for the other.

Gary

mosugoji64
03-15-2012, 05:24
Wasn't sure which way to go with this, so I took several small bottles and vatted a combination of Woodford Reserve Distiller's Select (nice taste, awful finish) and Devil's Cut (lots of Oak, lacking in depth) in ratios of 1:1 2:1 and 1:2.

Hopefully there will be the right balance in one of those.

After two personal successes and reading about others' experiments, I'm beginning to think that Devil's Cut may be a good flavoring whiskey. It's too limp on it's own, but seems to give others a good bump when needed. May be a good thing to keep on hand, if only it were a little cheaper.

StraightNoChaser
03-15-2012, 10:00
Not exactly bourbon... but the right ratio of Balcones True Blue and Balcones Single Malt tastes surprisingly like bourbon... a damn good one I might mention

timd
03-15-2012, 10:30
Not exactly bourbon... but the right ratio of Balcones True Blue and Balcones Single Malt tastes surprisingly like bourbon... a damn good one I might mention
So that's a "crooked" bourbon - as opposed to a straight one? :slappin:

JayMonster
03-15-2012, 20:18
Interesting approach and the right combination may well work. I'd try also a wheater with them, with the WR and DC being a kind of seasoning for the other.

Gary

I thought about trying to vat the DC with MM, but figured I would just wind up with something that tasted like Maker's 46. :rolleyes:

Tico
03-17-2012, 20:29
Just vatted up a full bottle with a 50/50 mix of OWA and Weller 12. Will give it a try tomorrow and then see how it progresses over the next few weeks.

sutton
03-18-2012, 06:09
Tried balancing the sweetness in the Angel's Envy with a 4:1 vatting with WT101. Liked it quite a bit. Also tried the same ratio with WT101 Rye, which I didn't like as much...

sailor22
03-18-2012, 06:32
After two personal successes and reading about others' experiments, I'm beginning to think that Devil's Cut may be a good flavoring whiskey. It's too limp on it's own, but seems to give others a good bump when needed. May be a good thing to keep on hand, if only it were a little cheaper.

Good idea on the DC!

I have been using Woodford Seasoned Oak in some vattings that needed a wood bump. It brings so much wood and flavor very little is needed in a vatting to have a big effect. It was a gift and turned out to be not a whiskey I would choose as a sipper, but it has lasted a very long time being used sparingly as a flavoring whiskey. Not looking forward to replacing it because of the cost. The DC will be a much more cost effective alternative.

Gillman
03-18-2012, 07:07
Excellent points!

Gary

Rughi
03-18-2012, 20:14
I've been vatting two of the same thing, sort of.

I recently got a Charter 10/86 that is very, very mild, with a light body, but a bright spice tingle that floats above all. It all finishes quickly. It is more similar to my expectations of recent AAA 10yo than my memory of Charters from the '70s - which brings me to its partner in the vatting... a 1972 Charter 7/86.

The 1972 has a heady caramel nose, heavier corn backbone, and a bit of old oak in the finish. A bit too much, actually, and a slight bit musty. It may be labeled 7 years old, but I'd bet that some of the barrels in that dump were much older than any of the barrels in the 10/86. However, watering that 1972 down with the fairly neutral current release brings it right into my happy zone.

And happy I am.

Roger

Tico
03-19-2012, 20:46
Trying my 50/50 of Weller 12 and OWA after 48 hours in the bottle. Haven't seen much of a difference yet in taste, curious to see what this will do with some more time.

JayMonster
03-21-2012, 21:20
After letting the 1:1 of Woodford and Devil's cut sit for a week, I decided to give it a try. I would say it was better than either of them alone, more flavor, no oxidized penny taste, but still nothing to write home about.

It did give me some high hopes for the 1:2 Woodford to DC vatting. But I also think I am going to allow it another week to... meld.

clingman71
04-03-2012, 09:38
I'm a big fan of the OWA - Weller 12 blend. Last night I had one of those "why didn't I think of this sooner" moments. Has anyone vatted MM +M46? I'm not particularly fond of reg Maker's, a little soft with a strange fruitiness, but I do like the mouthfeel. I like the 46 better, more spice, bolder, but pricey. I would like to play around with the ratios a bit, but expect it could be really good.

Gillman
04-03-2012, 09:59
Once again excellent experiments and reflections, the last two posts in particular but I enjoy all.

The "oxidized penny taste" IMO is the effect of the pot still combined with use of raw grains (as any bourbon) and relatively restrained aging, 4-5 years I believe. It's a taste that some Irish whiskey has, for similar reasons. Even though Versailles whiskey is only a part of the mingling for WR - indeed WR is a two-bourbon vatting, essentially - that pungent taste shows through.

When you add just a little WR though to a vatting, it adds complexity without the distinctive notes being identifiable. That is why 1:2 or even 1:3 will likely work better than 1:1, plus the distinctive taste of the DC will dominate. You have here - DC and WR - two fairly assertive whiskeys, so the mingling will always be assertive one way or the other. I'm not a big fan of the Beam taste but I find, just as with WR, it can add complexity and interest when a smaller amount is added to a greater amount of another whiskey (anything from 10%-25%).

I would try WR 1:3 with Maker's, say, or any low-rye recipe bourbon, it will "fill it out" and create a complex rich drink which doesn't really taste like either.

Gary

RobP_n_TN
04-03-2012, 18:09
I've been fond of the SB 1:1 vatting of OWA and Weller12 and stocked up on both to make sure I can have this combo for a while longer.

After reading the "Wheatley revelations" of SW and BT juice mingled in Pappy, I did a small 1:1 vat of JPS-17 (batch 7) and OWA just for yucks.....

Really good, and tastes somewhat familiar. I've got about 2 pours left - when I finish this I'll make a final decision, but for now, I think it is good enough for a full bottle next time.

Rob

JayMonster
04-03-2012, 20:09
So the 1:2 WR DC blend was tonight's sampling... And it was nothing like I expected. It seemed that the Woodford came across much more prominently in rhe 1:2 than it did in the even blending.

Where I was expecting basically Devil's Cut with more flavor, what I got was Woodford with a much more woody finish. The oxidized penny taste was much more prominent rhis time, but unlike straight Woodford, did not linger as the finish was dryer, shorter and far more oaky.

It was very much like what I imagined the WRDO would taste like. Those who like WR may like this blending... But it is definitely not for me. I will give it another week and try the 2:1 WR/DC blending and see if the opposite holds true and the Devil's Cut asserts itself more.

Gillman
04-04-2012, 04:07
Interesting. Sometimes when you add a little (relatively) of something, it pokes through more than if you add a greater amount, it's true. If I add a bit of something distinctive (say, oily or corny) to a much greater quantity of mixed bourbons, you can often still taste it, but not always. I'm thinking though the reverse won't happen if you do the obverse, I'd be interested in the results! For my taste though, I think a really good result would come from using either whiskey as the minority in a vatting with one which is relatively bland or uncomplex.

Gary

Brisko
04-04-2012, 06:59
Forgive me for discussing another bourbon/rye vatting here. Earlier I talked about Jim Beam Rye and Old Forester. In the same spirit, I vatted Heaven Hill Gold BiB with Beam Rye at about 3:2. The result was surprisingly clean drinking with significant depth. I wouldn't say it was as great as the Forester vatting, but quite interesting and one I would repeat (though maybe not in large quantity). As before the Beam funkiness was subdued, and the HH's rough edges smoothed a bit.

I also tried the same ratios but with Rittenhouse, which rendered the drink more astringent and brought out the corniness of the HH in way that wasn't entirely flattering. However adding a splash of EC12 brought the other elements into control and created (perversely) a more rye-like profile. I settled on a final ratio of 5:3:1 (HH:Ritt:EC12).

Back in the realm of two-bourbon vattings, I again brought HH and EC12 together. Despite the familial relationship they didn't really work well together, as the char and wood of the EC12 really come to the fore in this mingling even in the smallest quantities.

Rockefeller
04-07-2012, 14:07
As promised, I did a 50:50 PVW15/VWFRR last night (Both from the Fall11 release). It was incredible and highly recommended.

The amount of deep dried fruit on the nose was the first thing I noticed and it had an extremely rich mouthfeel. I didn't let it combine overnight so there were certain times where it was still possible to distinguish the individual whiskeys but overall, it had it's own unique taste profile. If I had to use one word to describe the blend, it would be sultry.

soad
04-08-2012, 16:10
After reading this thread I decided to try my hand at vatting. After some duds, I came up with a really delicious combination.

My sweet spot is 4 parts OWA, 3 parts Weller SR, and 3 parts Old Ezra 101. The result is almost exactly 100 proof. The Old Ezra gives the Wellers a little spice that makes it special. :bowdown:

JayMonster
04-10-2012, 20:54
OK, so tonight I poured combination number 3. 2:1 Woodford/Devil's Cut.

As Gary correctly predicted, the use of a smaller amount of DC did not provide an opposite result of the 1:2 mixing. The Woodford dominated this (not a good thing to me), and while I did get a nice wood taste in the mid palate, the oxidized penny taste while slightly subdued, was more than clear enough to be disheartening to me. Oh, and lest I forget, the nose on this was just (for some odd reason), just downright dreadful. Not alcohol, not acetone, but something more like that clear highly toxic fumed model plane glue you used to be able to get lightheaded with by just opening the little tube.

I could probably continue down this path seeking the right combination, but honestly, I don't think I care enough. I started down this road, just looking for a way to make this Woodford more palatable. It has become clear that I am not going to be buying this again, so there is no point in continuing this journey with this particular combination.

It was definitely worth the effort in the way of a learning experience, and I will certainly try Gillmanizing more bourbon (I figure I better not say vatting or blending, less I be called "ignorant" for using the improper terms) ... just not with Woodford in the mix.

Sombody mentioned on another thread that vatting is for use with inferior whiskies. I disagreed with him there, and this just solidifies that opinion. If you start with inferior whiskey, you are not going to come up with much more than an "adequate" mix. This isn't alchemy, you can't turn bad whiskey good.

Gillman
04-11-2012, 05:56
Jay I see what you mean, although to me no bourbon is really inferior, it's just a set of tastes. E.g. I think the pot-still flavor of WR works well when set against a bourbon of mild character, 1:4 perhaps. In general, I like to blend feisty and mild, or strong and weaker (in ABV), high rye vs. low rye, oily vs. non-, etc. At least for a two-whiskey combination.

I recognise the pitfalls of the term blend because it is associated today by many with adding GNS, but at one time a "blend of straight whiskeys", or "blend of straight bourbon whiskeys", and other variants, were often seen in the market. These didn't have GNS. IIRC these products were combinations of straight whiskeys from different states because just the terms bourbon or straight rye can mean a combination of whiskeys of that respective type made in different distilleries from the same state. All this was and is of relevance to the licensed companies which distill and sell whiskey in the market. From the standpoint of someone combining whiskeys at home as a kind of cocktail, I just call it a blend of straight whiskeys whether from one state or multiple states and whether bourbons only, ryes only, or both, are combined. (I use JD too, often, in the blends). It's an old thing though, this is what I have tried to emphasize throughout.

Gary

JayMonster
04-11-2012, 07:44
Jay I see what you mean, although to me no bourbon is really inferior, it's just a set of tastes. E.g. I think the pot-still flavor of WR works well when set against a bourbon of mild character, 1:4 perhaps. In general, I like to blend feisty and mild, or strong and weaker (in ABV), high rye vs. low rye, oily vs. non-, etc. At least for a two-whiskey combination.

I recognise the pitfalls of the term blend because it is associated today by many with adding GNS, but at one time a "blend of straight whiskeys", or "blend of straight bourbon whiskeys", and other variants, were often seen in the market. These didn't have GNS.

Gary

Yeah, I should clarify myself a bit. I wasn't speaking about Woodford specifically, but reiterating what was on another thread about how somebody thought you should blend say "Pappy" and "VWFRR" and that is should be saved for mixing "inferior" whiskies. I agree that there are plenty of people that like Woodford Reserve... I am just not one of them.

Also, I probably shouldn't have dragged it into this thread, but I had just finished another where the argument was being had about what is "Vatting" and what is properly called "blending" I will try to keep these issues separate, and for this purpose go back to calling it vatting since that is what we all generally use for it.

I'm certainly not giving up on vatting (just not Woodford), and I will look into trying some things that match those suggestions you listed. Thanks.

Gillman
04-11-2012, 09:47
Understood and by the way I'm not suggesting that, say, a 36 month corny bourbon is as good as an 8 year old bourbon, but that in a vatting each can find a good place. I find young oily bourbon can add weight and "middle", for example. WR, which I rarely drink on its own, can add "spice", etc.

Vatting is an excellent term for the purpose being discussed. I've used it myself many times and it's neater than "a blend of straight whiskeys"!

Gary

AaronWF
04-12-2012, 21:51
Well I discovered a very interesting combination tonight, though it's not bourbon on bourbon. In fact, in some circles, you might hear there was no bourbon involved at all, but I have been led to believe that Tennessee Whiskey is indeed bourbon.

I married some THHRye from '09 with Dickel Barrel Select. I really like the DBS, but I definitely wish it was stronger, and I've been finding the vanilla a bit over-powering. I enjoy the Handy more at a slightly lower proof than the 129 straight from the bottle. Put them together, and you get the rich, rounded vanilla and the tin wormwoodiness of the DBS combined with the spicy-hot cinnamon and thick, rough nature of the Handy all in the same breadth.

I haven't yet found the right ratio, but it might lie in a 1:1, though that also might depend on the mood I'm in. I like them each separately; they each have singular qualities that call out to me at different times. So, thinking of them together can be a bit overwhelming, but outside of the box, it may just enhance the intrigue of both at the same time.

Rockefeller
04-19-2012, 22:13
As a followup to my PVW15/VWFRR vatting, I just did a 50:50 mix of VW12 and VWFRR.

It is a FAR inferior dram. While the PVW15/VWFRR had an astounding amount of dried fruit on the nose and rich texture, I found the VW12/VWFRR to be a little plain with some straw undertones (it tasted a bit like an overly sweet scotch if that makes any sense).

JMHO, this was a case where the sum was less than the individual parts. Not recommended.

Gillman
04-20-2012, 06:24
Definitely agree that the 50-50 won't fly, or rather, if I made it that way I think I'd conclude the same! If you viewed the rye as something to add spice to the VW 12, and e.g. did 80-20 bourbon to the rye, this might produce a good emulation of rye-recipe bourbon that is 12 years old. It would be interesting to compare to Elijah Craig 12, most current bottles of which I find top-notch.

Gary

c2walker
04-23-2012, 18:26
I apologize for getting slightly off topic, because this vatting involved no bourbon, but I would call it a success...

Over in the rye forum there has been some discussion about older ryes falling flat after being open for a while and my open bottle of 2011 Saz 18 is a case in point. Since I wasn't enjoying my Saz 18 on its own as much as I had a few months ago, I decided to try it out in my own version of HWs Double Rye. Three days ago I combined 2oz of THH with 2oz of Saz 18 and I let them mingle until tonight. The result is a 109.3 proof rye that has the vibrant, young, rye spiciness of the Handy with the dry, leather, oak, and cocoa notes that I get from Saz 18. Overall, I'd call this a winner, but I'm going to continue experimenting with the ratios. The next mini batch will dial down the Handy. Maybe 3:2 Saz 18 to Handy.

clingman71
04-30-2012, 20:44
I went back to my mm-m46 50/50 vatting from a few weeks ago. While I enjoy this more than either individually, I am still playing with the ratios. I just vatted the last of my 46 1:2 with mm. We'll see how that works after a week or two mingling in the bottle. On a different note, I realized the other night that I probably haven't been giving mm its due. I tend to let pours sit anywhere from 10-30 minutes in the glass before tasting, especially wheaters. I realized however, that I don't do this with mm, more like 2 minutes, not exactly fair. Saturday at dinner I ordered makers at a restaurant(ridiculously limited choices) and let it sit a good while. It had a more "round" feel to me, less of the fruit(think orange)and more brown sugar, which I love. This revelation gives me high hopes for the 2:1mm-m46 vatting.

Gillman
05-12-2012, 19:31
Here's one I wouldn't have thought would work, but it does, and very well. Knob Creek and 4RSB. The 4RSB I used happened to be somewhat closed in and a little harsh. The KC was rich and sweet but with the Beam orange rind/anise signature a little forward (for me). The KC softens and improves the texture of the 4RSB, whereas the flowers and spice of the latter deepen and improve the taste of the KC. There is still a faint touch of oaky burn from the 4RSB, which may mean I'll add more KC next time, maybe 3:2 would be ideal.

Gary

clingman71
05-13-2012, 09:10
Just read through this thread again and it struck me, all the talk of the Weller SB Blend, mixing a younger higher proof with an older lower proof, has anyone tried vatting WT101 with RR10/90?

fishnbowljoe
05-13-2012, 21:20
Just read through this thread again and it struck me, all the talk of the Weller SB Blend, mixing a younger higher proof with an older lower proof, has anyone tried vatting WT101 with RR10/90?

I haven't mixed those two, but a couple of years or so ago, I experimented with a vatting of WTRB and RR10/90. Pretty tasty. Very similar in taste to the old RR10/101. I vatted a 750 of that, and brought it to the KBF a couple of years ago. It went over pretty well on the gazebo table. Someone dubbed it "Joe's Reserve". :grin: This was right after Old Crow Reserve made it's debut. :rolleyes:

CorvallisCracker
05-16-2012, 09:44
I haven't mixed those two, but a couple of years or so ago, I experimented with a vatting of WTRB and RR10/90. Pretty tasty. Very similar in taste to the old RR10/101. I vatted a 750 of that

I've done that too. Works well. It occurs to me that I should buy a bottle of each and do it again.



and brought it to the KBF a couple of years ago. It went over pretty well on the gazebo table. Someone dubbed it "Joe's Reserve". :grin: This was right after Old Crow Reserve made it's debut. :rolleyes:

Look on the bright side. At least they didn't call it "Old Joe's Reserve" :lol:

fishnbowljoe
05-16-2012, 14:14
Look on the bright side. At least they didn't call it "Old Joe's Reserve" :lol:

Good one Scott.:lol: Thank you sir. May I have another? :grin:

Vosgar
05-16-2012, 15:37
Old[/B] Joe's Reserve" :lol:

Damn, how did we let that get past us?

CorvallisCracker
05-16-2012, 15:39
Good one Scott.:lol: Thank you sir. May I have another? :grin:

Okay.

At least they didn't call it "Joe's Half Breed" :slappin:




You should be more careful of what you ask for.

JayMonster
05-16-2012, 18:57
Thinking about vatting some of. my Pure Kentucky XO with my EC12. The taste of these two are so similar. The XO definitely has more wood and spice, but also has a roughness to it. The EC12 is smoother, but less exciting and of course a lower proof. What do you vatters think? 1:1?

Young Blacksmith
05-17-2012, 05:52
My strategy would be to toss some in a glass, let it mingle for a few minutes or so, and try it. If you like it, do up a little bottle of it to let it mingle more. Let us know what you think too!

6-8 months ago I put some EWSB '01 and EWB together, and it has turned into something wonderful! I think I'll try adding a little pre-fire EC12 to amp up the rye a bit. MMM, wish it was 5 so I could do it now....:grin:

Wall Eye
05-17-2012, 05:53
My local store has been out of OWA and W12 for a long time so I've been craving a nice, easy drinking, lower shelf pour. I was pretty impressed with VOB BIB, but it just seemed to have a little more alcohol bite than I wanted so I picked up a VOB86. It had promise, but was way too laid back.

Solution? I've vatted them at 1:1 and got just what I was looking for - a 6yr, 93pf that's smooth and tasty - for about $13.50 a 750ml. It's weird, but I would bet that this combo would be picked out of a blind taste by most as a wheater - which was what I was looking for anyway.

It isn't going to win any double golds but I'm way impressed with these VOBs - especially for the price.

luther.r
05-17-2012, 07:59
I have a couple bottles of OF Prime 1992 that have that great SW sweetness but are pretty weak at 80 proof. I recently did an in-glass mix of 2 parts OWA and 1 part OF Prime, and it was very nice. It added some of that gentle SW elegance and mouthfeel, and gave some additional proof and complexity to the OF. I did a half-bottle OWA vatting that I'm going to give some time, but I have high hopes for this one.

Gillman
06-01-2012, 18:36
Right now I've got a vatting of 60% OWA and 40% BT. This particular OWA was a little rough-edged, thin and with a brett-like element in the aftertaste, the BT was better but a little spirity. The combination is softer and more complex than either. I added a touch of water too to bring it down just a bit.

Gary

JayMonster
06-01-2012, 20:42
Did a 1:1 of Pure Kentucky XO and Elijah Craig. Turned out exactly as I suspected ... a stronger EC12 with a bit more oak on the finish.

It was fine, and if you are a big EC12 fan and wish it had more pop, then you will like it, but overall it didn't excite me enough to do it again.

ChainWhip
06-03-2012, 19:51
How long do you let it "vat"?

CoMobourbon
06-30-2012, 08:46
Basil Hayden (still at 8 years) and OGD 114 (or maybe OGD BIB)? This seems stupidly obvious and simple - I understand that they're supposed to be the same juice at different ages and proofs - but I am still interested in advice as to what ratios might work best.

Maybe 50/50? Or would more than 50% BH be needed to significantly alter (smooth out/lighten up/sweeten?) the OGD?

This is interesting because most of the vattings above seem to account mostly for differences in mash bill, especially differences in rye vs. wheat content. A BH and ODG blend seems like a perfect chance to figure out how different ages affect vattings. (I am operating under the assumption that the OGD is little more than half the age of BH.)

*Now that I think about it, the would-be clever plan above is really not so original; doesn't SB blend fit the same pattern (but with wheaters instead of rye bourbons)?

Young Blacksmith
06-30-2012, 11:39
That would be similar to one of my vattings I still have, but I did Heaven Hill. EWB + EWSB + EC12. The EWB was nicely young, but needed a bit more complexity. They EWSB was OK, but needed a bit more sweetness. The EC12 was sweet, but the rye kick at the end was harsh.

All three together made for a nice blend. Not very far from the originals, but just enough to make the bottle finishable.

I say try it, and let us know how it goes!

CoMobourbon
06-30-2012, 17:58
Bourbons mixed; will get back in a week or two with a report.

kyrocklover
06-30-2012, 17:58
Just mixed a 50/50 split of Rare Breed and Knob Creek. First taste was damn good but the nose was not.

JayMonster
06-30-2012, 18:31
How long do you let it "vat"?

I will test at 2 weeks and usually wait 4 weeks. But that is just me, and others may have different periods they allow it to marry.

Gillman
07-01-2012, 07:52
I really don't apply any marrying time, I think once you blend them in the bottle, it's done. It would be different if the marriage was barreled and stored for a while because further aging would take place.

I know many feel though that a period of resting in the bottle may help, it may well be so, but I don't think the changes would be significant.

Gary

mosugoji64
07-01-2012, 10:14
Basil Hayden (still at 8 years) and OGD 114 (or maybe OGD BIB)? This seems stupidly obvious and simple - I understand that they're supposed to be the same juice at different ages and proofs - but I am still interested in advice as to what ratios might work best.

Maybe 50/50? Or would more than 50% BH be needed to significantly alter (smooth out/lighten up/sweeten?) the OGD?

This is interesting because most of the vattings above seem to account mostly for differences in mash bill, especially differences in rye vs. wheat content. A BH and ODG blend seems like a perfect chance to figure out how different ages affect vattings. (I am operating under the assumption that the OGD is little more than half the age of BH.)

*Now that I think about it, the would-be clever plan above is really not so original; doesn't SB blend fit the same pattern (but with wheaters instead of rye bourbons)?

Your idea makes perfect sense. My initial thought would be to vat the combo down to 100 proof (a greater ratio of BH to OGD) and give that a try. Let us know how it turns out!

CoMobourbon
07-01-2012, 18:44
I really don't apply any marrying time, I think once you blend them in the bottle, it's done. It would be different if the marriage was barreled and stored for a while because further aging would take place.



Your idea makes perfect sense. My initial thought would be to vat the combo down to 100 proof (a greater ratio of BH to OGD) and give that a try. Let us know how it turns out!

My inclination would be to agree with Gary, but as this is my first time vatting, I thought I might try it at various stages.

To that end, I tried the BH / OGD 114 mix a few hours ago (at less than 24 hours after blending). To be clear, I added them at 50/50 (100 ml each), which should put the resultant whiskey at 97 proof. Math was never my best subject, but I'm pretty sure that 80+114/2 = 97.

Simply put, the result was good. Nothing was astounding because nothing was unaccountable; it just turned out like a good balanced mixture of both as expected. The defining features of each, good and bad, were moderated, but in such a way that the weaknesses lost more than the strengths.

I am rambling; let me try to get a little more specific. To make the complex matter of taste simpler, I will say that the front end tasted like the BH while the back end and finish tasted more like the OGD. More of a sweet delicate rye with honey and floral notes on the front/beginning, and more of that unmistakable orange spicy slightly woody dark flavor ("burnt brownie" as somebody sage here once described it) on the back end. I was really surprised at how cleanly these flavors separated and at how nicely they mediated each other. The experience, then, is smoother and sweeter than the OGD but carries more punch and character than the BH alone.

I will try to save some for 2 weeks or at least 1 week, but my first response here is a thumbs up with caveats. It is really good and nicely balanced, but I feel like big fans of BH and big fans of ODG 114 (like me) might not always prefer it to their respective babies. For example, I am unlikely to reach for it when I am in the mood for OGD 114, which is pretty often. Also, I basically never have BH in the house. I imagine that BH fans find themselves in the converse situation.

Here it is (finally I found it!): If you are looking for an improvement on the already formidable ODG BIB or otherwise want a better version of ODG near 100 proof, go for it. If you want ODG 114, though, there is no substitute, and this vatting is no exception.

Enoch
07-07-2012, 08:33
I had a bottle of WTR 81 and a bottle of Rebel Yell. I don't care for either so I blended them 1:1 and it produced a fairly drinkable blend. At least I don't have to give them to my daughter's male friends. (Like Mikey, they'll drink anything.)

CoMobourbon
07-08-2012, 05:59
For the record, after 1.5 weeks, the 50/50 BH OGD114 vatting seems marginally improved.

That is to say, it was good on the 1st day and is maybe even a little better on the 9-12th day. It might just be my imagination / expectations, but it seems more well integrated. Maybe 1.5 weeks of distance between now and the memory of mixing it play a factor here, but I feel like this vatting tastes like a believable (and excellent) whiskey that a pro might have bottled.

In any case, I think that I will go ahead and vat the rest of my dwindling OGD 114 supply. Sad, bittersweet day.

ChainWhip
07-11-2012, 18:06
I really don't apply any marrying time, I think once you blend them in the bottle, it's done. It would be different if the marriage was barreled and stored for a while because further aging would take place.

I know many feel though that a period of resting in the bottle may help, it may well be so, but I don't think the changes would be significant.

Gary

If this is true, I am curious why Balvenie marries various barrels in a Tun for months - is the purpose to further age the whisky? It seems odd considering the ages of the single barrels in those Tun batches.

Gillman
07-11-2012, 18:29
I did mention this, the tun is wood and therefore further aging occurs via e.g. the pores in the wood, evaporation, etc. I believe nothing comparable takes place in a sealed bottle although I know some people feel changes occur, and perhaps they do, it's hard really to know.

Gary

ChainWhip
07-13-2012, 09:01
Given the ages of those barrels it doesn't seem to make much sense to age them for the few months before bottling.

Unless aging the vatted contents together contributes to a better "marriage" of the barrels?

JPBoston
07-13-2012, 11:32
Right now I've got a vatting of 60% OWA and 40% BT. This particular OWA was a little rough-edged, thin and with a brett-like element in the aftertaste, the BT was better but a little spirity. The combination is softer and more complex than either. I added a touch of water too to bring it down just a bit.

Gary

I've been skimming this thread just to see if anybody has tried this yet. The chewy sweetness of OWA mixed with BT's leathery rye spice must be pretty interesting! Gotta give this a shot sometime.

Brisko
09-10-2012, 07:54
Another bourbon and rye vatting, and one that I'm quite pleased with: Rittenhouse BiB with just a splash or so of Knob Creek Single Barrel. The older, higher proof KC lends a great deal of depth to the rye, which, while I like it fine as is, does come across a bit young at times. The various KCSBs I've tried seem to consistently have more barrel influence than the standard KC and this one is no different; it's this aspect that seems to play so well with the Rittenhouse.

Also, counterintuitively, the addition of bourbon to the Ritt rye doesn't make it more bourbon-like (many have noted that Ritt is rather bourbon-like already) but actually brings the rye characteristics to the fore.

I'm looking forward to trying this in slightly different ratios, but all in all, it's a combo that I'll be repeating.

Gillman
09-10-2012, 08:24
Good points and the one that adding bourbon to rye doesn't necessarily make it taste less rye-like, reminds me of something Chuck once said, that adding more rye in the mash to rye whiskey doesn't necessarily increase the rye taste because it is so prominent already. So same thing here, e.g. 1/3rd bourbon and 2/3 rds a rye-forward drink like Ritt Bond will still have a good rye taste. Of course if you did 9:1 bourbon to rye, that's different since the rye will be counteracted by the overall higher corn content post-mingling, but you will still taste extra rye I think, because again a little goes a long way. It's essentially like boosting the rye small grains in the bourbon, at least if both are roughly the same age (is how I look at it).

Gary

ILLfarmboy
09-13-2012, 14:24
Just skimmed the thread but I didn't see anyone mentioning WTRB and FRSB. I once mixed this in a 2 to 1 ratio. I thought it was quite good.

fishnbowljoe
11-19-2012, 14:56
I was just fooling around a bit the other night when I vatted some KC and TW Samuels BIB. Approximately a 1:1 ratio. I really wasn't expecting much, so the results actually surprised me. Gone was the preverbal Beam "off/yeasty" taste, and the slightly bitter/woody flavor in the Samuels seemed to disappear as well. Not too bad at all.

Gillman
11-19-2012, 16:48
This is my experience, that the funky yeast taste of Beam, which is noticeable in KC despite the age and proof, disappears and somehow transforms egregious flavors in less expensive bourbons such as too much bitter or dusty wood (FC?), or too much corn oil. And vice versa I guess.

It's quite remarkable how it works, but it does, IMO.

Adding a third bourbon, e.g. any FR such as Brad mentioned, or a straight rye, can make the vatting even better. Same thing with Jack Daniels SB.

But then it isn't a double-barreled gun anymore. :)

Gary

Ejmharris
12-21-2012, 17:25
Not successful at all, Woodford and Weller 12 1 to 1. Flat awful! I thought the sweet oaky flavor would spruce up the WR little but just came out as oaky alcohol.


Mike

Gillman
12-21-2012, 19:31
I would try much less WR, maybe 1:3 or 1:4. The Woodford would lend rye and pot still notes to the relatively bland but aged wheater, and the latter would give some further age to the WR, which could stand it IMO.

Gary

Ejmharris
12-21-2012, 20:06
Gary, thanks for the input. I will give those ratios a try next time around.


Mike

jeffrey r
12-22-2012, 06:17
Down to the last tidbit of of my only Van Winkle bourbon (a Lot B from last fall), and with PVW of any sort being virtually unattainable in the NY/NJ area, I figured I'd take a simple shot at recreating a Lot B with what I had on hand. Took 2/3 Weller 12 for the same essential profile, mixed with 1/3 Vintage 17 wheater for the extra richness and depth it provides, and it was quite delicious. Probably even better than the Lot B due to the V17 adding quite a bit of aged wheated goodness to the mix.

Gillman
12-22-2012, 07:19
No problem Mike, give it a shot, pun intentional! :)

Gary

TheNovaMan
03-05-2013, 01:07
Not alcohol, not acetone, but something more like that clear highly toxic fumed model plane glue you used to be able to get lightheaded with by just opening the little tube. My post was going to be simply "toluene" but that's too short. To me, Testors Model Cement smells strongly of toluene.

SFS
03-05-2013, 07:44
My post was going to be simply "toluene" but that's too short. To me, Testors Model Cement smells strongly of toluene.

It should, it's about 70% toluene.

shoshani
03-07-2013, 06:46
I have a house vatting that I like very much: 2/3 Very Old Barton BIB to 1/2 Old Grand-Dad BIB. They complement each other nicely. (I first tried half and half, but I like this ratio better.)

black mamba
03-07-2013, 15:28
I find that wheaters vat well. I combined Weller 12, OF 12, DN 1843 and Bernheim in about equal parts and came up with something better than any of them on their own. Several other tasters of this vatting have agreed with me.

MarkRuck
03-07-2013, 18:20
I too am a big fan of the 1:1 vatting of Weller 12 and OWA 107. It makes a great whiskey. I am now just buying a 750ml of each, pouring into a large pitcher, and then re-bottling.

I am looking forward to trying some of the other suggestions posted above.

Thanks again for the ideas.

G-Rat
03-07-2013, 20:05
This thread made think about blending my two all time favorite bourbons: HH white BiB and VOB BiB. Ratio was 1 part HH to 3 parts VOB. It's got the spiced heat of the HH and (by comparison) the refined less spicy but more orangey flavored of the VOB. Glad I picked up a bunch of both in KY last week!

Quantum
03-07-2013, 21:18
I tried one of 3 parts Weller 12 to 1 part Larceny. The Larceny adds a whole new layer of flavor, very interesting. It takes a week or so for the flavors to meld, but I am starting to enjoy it.

G-Rat
03-07-2013, 22:29
I tried one of 3 parts Weller 12 to 1 part Larceny. The Larceny adds a whole new layer of flavor, very interesting. It takes a week or so for the flavors to meld, but I am starting to enjoy it.
This is something I have contemplated trying. Glad to hear it works out well.

Brisko
03-08-2013, 06:51
At Squire's suggestion, I vatted together HH Gold BiB with Dickel Rye. The mint really comes forward in this vatting. The taste is very similar to what I would call the HH house profile of just a few years ago--dry, grassy, and minty. The current BiBs have been dry and grassy, but less minty.

Successful? I don't know about that... but fun and definitely drinkable. I wouldn't mix an entire decanter of it, though :grin:

Gillman
03-08-2013, 19:44
Initially I was working with a combination of 5 or 6 JD's (mostly Blacks but one SB at least - but I consider it all just Jack), and then added about 10% bonded Ritt. I still couldn't get it right, it was a little edgy and the Jack dominated without the rye adding much. Then I added about 5% Maker's, so now a four grain, and it came into its own. First and foremost is the silky and seamless mouthfeel and then the tamped down Jack notes, i.e., still Jack made deeper and richer and sweeter and well, less Jack. It's a winner albeit not a two-vat anymore.

Gary

black mamba
03-08-2013, 22:39
About 3 years ago I had the Weller, Stag and Saz Antiques at the same time, and when they all got low (like an inch or inch and a half of each) I vatted them all together for another 4 grain. It was absolutely stupendous! My spirits buddy agreed, fantastic!

Another thing I like to do is when any low rye bourbon has hung around a little too long and gets flabby, I just add about an ounce or two of OGD114 and presto-chango, it's a lean, mean biting machine again.

Gillman
03-10-2013, 15:00
Here's another one: 1:1 Ritt bond with MM. I added a light dash water as well, not sure if it helped, I think it did.

The Ritt has these huge aromas and tastes of earth, grass and, well, that certain something you can get in straight whiskey. It's perfect as is for any cocktail treatment, but on its own it is a bit much for me. The MM is rather bland and sweetish, so basically it cuts the Ritt profile to a more even, bourbony palate. I found two rocks assisted to bring out the bright flavours. It's funny how two whiskeys which are a little rough in the finish - acidic or tannic or whatever, and it does vary by bottle - can become soft and pillowy simply by being combined. But it does happen, some abstruse combination of ions or something.

Gary

black mamba
03-10-2013, 15:25
I tried 3 parts JTS Brown BIB with 1 part EC 12. As you might expect, it tasted a lot like HH White 6 yr, but maybe even better. Very close.

Old Dusty
03-10-2013, 16:25
The " Wheat Sandwich" (patent pending) is 2pt Rebel Reserve, 1pt MM and 1 pt Bernheim. Turns into a very palatable Wheater especially if you find yourself with Rebel Reserve to spare, and who doesn't.

edit: technically this is off topic because it's a Three bourbon vatting but carry on.

Gillman
03-10-2013, 19:24
That sounds very good! I think the last part might be a William Larue Weller as well. But that is exactly how I would do it, ramping up so to speak in quality but inversely, or planing out, in terms of volume.

Gary

smokinjoe
03-12-2013, 08:25
The " Wheat Sandwich" (patent pending) is 2pt Rebel Reserve, 1pt MM and 1 pt Bernheim. Turns into a very palatable Wheater especially if you find yourself with Rebel Reserve to spare, and who doesn't.

edit: technically this is off topic because it's a Three bourbon vatting but carry on.

Not so fast, my friend! (Thought a Corso-ism would make you feel welcome, Hoosier. :D) You still have just 2 bourbons in there. Bernheim is a wheat whiskey. So, you're good...

:toast:

Old Dusty
03-12-2013, 08:54
Not so fast, my friend! (Thought a Corso-ism would make you feel welcome, Hoosier. :D) You still have just 2 bourbons in there. Bernheim is a wheat whiskey. So, you're good...

:toast:
Joe, great point! I stand corrected. And I love Corso.

smokinjoe
03-12-2013, 09:12
Joe, great point! I stand corrected. And I love Corso.

Just a Ball Stater helping a Hoosier brother out. :D

fishnbowljoe
03-13-2013, 20:51
Bowling night tonight. Our team drank better than we bowled. :rolleyes: We did a side by side of MM 84 proof, and MM 90 proof. One friend from another team brought some OGD 114, and Phillips bourbon. All were decent. Near the end of the night, there were four glasses partially filled with theses bourbons. I asked Gary what he thought about mixing them all together. He said go for it. So I did. :grin: I wasn't expecting much, but was I surprised at the outcome. The sum of this vatting was way better than any of them individually. Here's approximately the amounts of each we vatted.

1 part MM 90 proof
2 parts MM 84 proof
3 parts Phillips 80 proof
6 parts OGD 114

The OGD 114 helped out the other three, while the combo of the other three seemed to offset the higher proof of the OGD 114. The MM's and Phillips also seemed to quell the Beam yeasty taste in the OGD 114. All in all a great vatting. Medium and slightly sweet on entry. Mid palate saw this open up nicely. The finish was great. Nice, warming and long. Very well balanced if you can believe it.


FWIW, Of the six of us that did the MM side by side comparison, only one guy picked 'em wrong. :skep:

Old Dusty
03-14-2013, 05:53
Bowling night tonight. Our team drank better than we bowled. :rolleyes: We did a side by side of MM 84 proof, and MM 90 proof. One friend from another team brought some OGD 114, and Phillips bourbon. All were decent. Near the end of the night, there were four glasses partially filled with theses bourbons. I asked Gary what he thought about mixing them all together. He said go for it. So I did. :grin: I wasn't expecting much, but was I surprised at the outcome. The sum of this vatting was way better than any of them individually. Here's approximately the amounts of each we vatted.

1 part MM 90 proof
2 parts MM 84 proof
3 parts Phillips 80 proof
6 parts OGD 114

The OGD 114 helped out the other three, while the combo of the other three seemed to offset the higher proof of the OGD 114. The MM's and Phillips also seemed to quell the Beam yeasty taste in the OGD 114. All in all a great vatting. Medium and slightly sweet on entry. Mid palate saw this open up nicely. The finish was great. Nice, warming and long. Very well balanced if you can believe it.


FWIW, Of the six of us that did the MM side by side comparison, only one guy picked 'em wrong. :skep:


Wow a FOUR bagger! Has that ever even been attempted? It's the Triple Lindy of vatting. You just took this thread in a new and dangerously interesting direction.

T Comp
03-14-2013, 06:50
Here's another one: 1:1 Ritt bond with MM. I added a light dash water as well, not sure if it helped, I think it did.

The Ritt has these huge aromas and tastes of earth, grass and, well, that certain something you can get in straight whiskey. It's perfect as is for any cocktail treatment, but on its own it is a bit much for me. The MM is rather bland and sweetish, so basically it cuts the Ritt profile to a more even, bourbony palate. I found two rocks assisted to bring out the bright flavours. It's funny how two whiskeys which are a little rough in the finish - acidic or tannic or whatever, and it does vary by bottle - can become soft and pillowy simply by being combined. But it does happen, some abstruse combination of ions or something.

Gary

As always great tip Gary! Of course the same excellent result with my substitution of 80 proof DSP 16 made Old Fitz Prime for the MM (no water). The sum is richer, with the Ritt benefitting some of the light grape/wine notes of the Old Fitz Prime and results in some subtle brandy flavors. I've tried adding 10 ml of some other whiskeys to the 20/20 ml mix but so far prefer the 1:1 combo on this one. I'll mix some up for the Sampler.

smokinjoe
03-14-2013, 09:27
Bowling night tonight. Our team drank better than we bowled. :rolleyes: We did a side by side of MM 84 proof, and MM 90 proof. One friend from another team brought some OGD 114, and Phillips bourbon. All were decent. Near the end of the night, there were four glasses partially filled with theses bourbons. I asked Gary what he thought about mixing them all together. He said go for it. So I did. :grin: I wasn't expecting much, but was I surprised at the outcome. The sum of this vatting was way better than any of them individually. Here's approximately the amounts of each we vatted.

1 part MM 90 proof
2 parts MM 84 proof
3 parts Phillips 80 proof
6 parts OGD 114

The OGD 114 helped out the other three, while the combo of the other three seemed to offset the higher proof of the OGD 114. The MM's and Phillips also seemed to quell the Beam yeasty taste in the OGD 114. All in all a great vatting. Medium and slightly sweet on entry. Mid palate saw this open up nicely. The finish was great. Nice, warming and long. Very well balanced if you can believe it.


FWIW, Of the six of us that did the MM side by side comparison, only one guy picked 'em wrong. :skep:

Hey Joe, what was the percentage of backwash spit in there? And, did you pick up on the Gary's Hot Pastrami on rye with extra kraut at lunch on the nose? :lol:
;)
:toast:

Gillman
03-14-2013, 12:03
Well of course, that's now the "Ten Pin Vatting"! (Anyone trying it is advised to eat a corned beef sandwich on the side :)).

Interesting too what you said about the MM comparison.

Gary

Gillman
03-14-2013, 12:05
That sounds great Thad, it is probably better than mine! I agree you don't need the water, the 80 takes care of that. Look forward to trying it at Sampler.

Gary

squire
03-14-2013, 12:10
I find the MM taste comparison very interesting.

Vosgar
03-14-2013, 17:56
Hey Joe, what was the percentage of backwash spit in there? And, did you pick up on the Gary's Hot Pastrami on rye with extra kraut at lunch on the nose? :lol:
;)
:toast:

And that's why you're BOTY Joe, thinking of the little things we forgot. Geez, we all thought it was so simple

Bandg
03-15-2013, 17:19
Not two, but here goes. Combined equal parts OF 86 and 100, EC12 and Maker's Mark. Quite a bit better than the parts individually. Best, Bradley