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Bourbon Boiler
07-16-2011, 17:01
I know the reviews on Woodstone Creek (Cincy, OH) are mixed at best, but I noticed that they are due to release a 5 grain white dog in the near future. I assume that some of this will end up in barrels as well, so in a few years we might get another interesting product in the marketplace.

I don't know much about how this might turn out, but I do like seeing the micros experimenting and letting us see the results.

jburlowski
07-16-2011, 18:34
Hmmm.... I wonder how this will differ from the five grain bourbon that they released a few years back.

cowdery
07-17-2011, 17:21
I assume it's the same stuff, just the white dog version of it.

It's funny, because when Woodstone started no one was trying to sell 'white whiskey' so Woodstone went the aged route and produced a (too) young bourbon. Now it looks like they're going backwards, to a white product, because that has become the fashion.

jburlowski
07-19-2011, 14:51
I assume it's the same stuff, just the white dog version of it.

It's funny, because when Woodstone started no one was trying to sell 'white whiskey' so Woodstone went the aged route and produced a (too) young bourbon. Now it looks like they're going backwards, to a white product, because that has become the fashion.

Five years was too young?

cowdery
07-20-2011, 08:49
Five years was too young?

In this case, yes. Thin and green would be my capsule review.

jburlowski
07-23-2011, 11:57
Stopped by Woodstone Creek this afternoon and picked up a bottle of their just released 8 yo, five grain straight bourbon. Also got a bottle of their 10 yo single malt whiskey.

The white dog and a four grain version of the straight bourbon are ready to be released but they are waiting for the state of Ohio to complete all the requisite paperwork.

Tasting notes will follow....

Gillman
07-23-2011, 12:37
John, very much look forward to your take on the 8 years old, good catch to pick that up. Surely it is the oldest craft bourbon on the market today.

That should be excellent. The 5 year version was good but needed more time in the barrel IMO due to the emphatic pot still character of this spirit. I would think 8 years should result in a much more nuanced palate.

Gary

Bourbon Boiler
07-23-2011, 14:10
Am I correct in saying the fifth grain is another type of corn?

jburlowski
07-24-2011, 04:52
Yes: white corn, yellow corn, malted barley, malted wheat, and malted rye.

sutton
07-24-2011, 05:22
Yes: white corn, yellow corn, malted barley, malted wheat, and malted rye.

Interesting ... what characteristic does white corn vs. yellow add?

Bourbon Boiler
07-24-2011, 05:55
Do the 2 corns combine for 51%, or is yellow corn 51%?

jburlowski
07-24-2011, 09:14
Do the 2 corns combine for 51%, or is yellow corn 51%?
The two combined = 51%.

cowdery
07-24-2011, 14:10
Interesting ... what characteristic does white corn vs. yellow add?

It allows you to say "five grain" on the label.

sutton
07-24-2011, 14:18
It allows you to say "five grain" on the label.

:grin: OK ... however, the marketing worked. It got me interested and I guess that's the point!

cowdery
07-24-2011, 14:30
It's debatable how much difference different strains of grain make when you're distilling out so much of the grain character.

Bourbon Boiler
07-24-2011, 17:09
Particularly if the content of the "second" grain is minor. But again, it's effective. This thread will soon be on it's third page with no positive reviews of any prodcut.

callmeox
07-24-2011, 17:46
Talk to me when the 5 grains include cheese corn, caramel corn and candy corn.

cowdery
07-24-2011, 19:42
One thing I like (positive review!) about the Koval white whiskeys are that they are single grain and distilled to have a distinctive grain character. If I'm buying spelt, I want to taste spelt.

tmckenzie
07-25-2011, 03:31
Spelt makes a nice product when mashed with corn. If white corn were available here, I would switch altogether. It gives a flavor that to me is lees like corn and more of a candied taste. Make a smoother distillate as well.