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bigtoys
01-24-2012, 19:12
my last thread on the topic in 2007 fizzled out. maybe now we have some more martini drinkers.
I've stuck with the Bombay Sapphire dirty with Martini & Rossi dry vermouth. Still working on my 3 large bottles of Dirty Sue Olive Juice; have some others, too. Since Sam's closed in Highland Park, I have to stuff my own blue cheese olives; I ask for something soft at Whole Foods. However, today, we were in the city, so I got the olives at Binny's on Marcy St. that used to be the main Sam's store. The bottled store bought olives just don't cut it.
Only made a mini, since I had to go out after dinner.
2nd favorite gin: Hendricks
also rans: Tanq 10, Brokers, Northshore
never: vodka

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/IMAG0425.jpg

jcg9779
01-24-2012, 19:39
I don't drink martinis often but when I do I prefer them with a twist (since I'm not an olive fan). I have a few gins on hand - Hendrick's, Bombay Sapphire, Gordon's - and use one of these most of the time. I never make vodka martinis, but I will do the "James Bond" martini, which combines gin, vodka and lillet. I think this is very refreshing in the summer.

Clavius
01-24-2012, 20:30
I still haven't tried a gin martini. I've always made mine with vodka and a hint of dry vermouth. Oh, and a bunch of olives! Gotta have the olives.

cbus
01-24-2012, 22:53
I rarely drink martinis, but the one that I tend to prefer is the "smokey" martini, which requires a touch of scotch. I also prefer the lemon twist, as olives are not really my thing, either.

ratcheer
01-25-2012, 04:34
I prefer a regular dry martini, simply made with Beefeater gin, dry vermouth, and three olives. Like others have already said, I don't have them very often.

Tim

jcg9779
01-25-2012, 05:36
I don't drink martinis often but when I do I prefer them with a twist (since I'm not an olive fan). I have a few gins on hand - Hendrick's, Bombay Sapphire, Gordon's - and use one of these most of the time. I never make vodka martinis, but I will do the "James Bond" martini, which combines gin, vodka and lillet. I think this is very refreshing in the summer.


I prefer a regular dry martini, simply made with Beefeater gin, dry vermouth, and three olives. Like others have already said, I don't have them very often.

Tim


I said Gordon's Gin, but I meant Beefeater Gin. I don't know where that came from...I've never bought a bottle of Gordon's in my life!

Jono
01-25-2012, 09:09
http://cocktaildb.com/recipe_detail?id=4596

Rye Martini (not much of a gin, vermouth or vodka drinker).

I would change the ratios to 2/3 rye, a mere dash of vermouth or vodka, 1/3 forbidden fruit and dashes of absinthe optional plus the olives.

Happyhour24x7
01-25-2012, 11:32
I am a very big martini drinker. I like a high vermouth ratio, Dolin if possible, about 3:1 gin to vermouth. by far the smoothest gin I have found is Plymouth; it makes a beautiful, clean, martini. other favorites are #209 from San Francisco, a very floral and smooth gin; and Bombay- not the Sapphire. Broker's is also a frequent visitor. In case you haven't figured it out, I am not a fan of the higher juniper spicy gins; although if you are, Bombay Sapphire, Bluecoat, and Junipero are some of the best in that category. sometimes I will also do the James Bond version if a spicy gin is all that's available. a couple dashes of orange bitters and a twist of lemon and it's done: perfection in a glass.

Parkersback
01-25-2012, 14:05
I only can think of drinking martinis in the summer. My usual is (blasphemously) Ketel One vodka, 3 olives, and a hint of a rumor of a whisper of dry vermouth, served painfully cold.

AaronWF
01-25-2012, 14:15
I pretty much gave up martinis when I discovered the joys of Leopold's Gin on the rocks with a few olives; you don't have to worry about your vermouth going bad and no turning red in the face from operating the shaker.

I pretty much gave up gin when I started getting belligerent on it. Whiskey mostly mellows me and sometimes it can make my eyes shoot sparks, but gin goes straight to my head.

smokinjoe
01-25-2012, 16:39
I probably did post on your previous thread, but i'm in an airport bar waiting for my flight, and I'm bored. It's always been Bombay Sapphire. But, I've been diggin' on Corsair's Gin of late. Heavy on the gin, light on the Vermouth. Not particular on the olives, but if'n I'm hungry, then olives with shtuff in 'em. But always now, always, a coating of the glass with worstestertestertestershire sause. :yum:

BTW, only Lea & Perrins on the WS....

BMartin42
01-25-2012, 17:09
I prefer a regular dry martini, simply made with Beefeater gin, dry vermouth, and three olives. Like others have already said, I don't have them very often.

Tim

This is exactly how I prefer mine as well.

A drunk lawyer in a bar once told his theory on martinis. He said they are exactly like breasts.

As I set with a puzzled look on my face he explained that one is simply not enough, three is WAY too many, and four is great, but just causes problems later.

bigtoys
01-25-2012, 20:24
I am a very big martini drinker. I like a high vermouth ratio, Dolin if possible, about 3:1 gin to vermouth. by far the smoothest gin I have found is Plymouth; it makes a beautiful, clean, martini. .....

saw some favorable reviews of Dolin vermouth on the 'net. may have to give it a try.

I tend toward 'tinis in the winter months, margaritas in the summer.

chperry
01-26-2012, 17:32
I prefer a twist. As for the recipe, I prefer Bombay Sapphire with Vya dry vermouth at a ratio of 4 to 1.

Kalessin
01-31-2012, 14:33
I like the mid-to-low juniper gins; my two favorites right now are Hendricks ($30 on sale) an Berkshire Distilling's "Greylock" gin ($27). I tend to pour at about 3.5:1 gin to vermouth, and garnish with three large olives. Stirred, not shaken, though my home method is more often to swish the drink and ice in the bottom of a shaker and then strain.

pfiest
02-01-2012, 11:57
I prefer Beefeater dirty martini's. Beefeater, splash of M&R Dry vermouth, splash of olive brine and 3 olives.

tsangster
02-01-2012, 14:50
Fill glass with crushed ice and water to chill
Fill shaker with ice
Add dry vermouth to shaker and coat ice
Discard excess
Add gin (preferably Sapphire) to shaker and shake
Remove ice and water from glass
Strain gin into glass
Add 3 olives (blue cheese stuffed are especially tasty on special occasions)

dohidied
02-01-2012, 14:57
I enjoy a 10:1 Hendricks/Noilly Pratt Martini. Although, it has been a while since I mixed that. I might try it 5:1 next time.

Slob
02-01-2012, 15:28
Plymouth, Noilly Prat, Regan's orange bitters, ONE olive.

chperry
02-25-2012, 06:18
Bombay Sapphire, Vya dry vermouth (4 to 1), Regans orange bitters, twist. Plymouth gin works nicely also.

cas
02-29-2012, 17:23
So what defines a martini anymore? Seems to me it's anything in a martini glass. Was this always the case?
Craig

ratcheer
02-29-2012, 17:43
So what defines a martini anymore? Seems to me it's anything in a martini glass. Was this always the case?
Craig

No, it used to be dry gin and dry vermouth. Then came the vodka martini. Then there was slow evolution with slightly varying ingredients for a long, long time. The floodgates probably opened in the early to mid 90's and now, like you say, just about anything can be called a martini. Except, most people probably wouldn't know a real martini if it bit them in the ass.

Tim

ratcheer
03-01-2012, 16:52
This article just showed up, today:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/01/how-to-order-a-martini_n_1311276.html

Tim

bigtoys
04-09-2012, 18:56
got the Botanist gin, a new vermouth (Dolin, some soft blue cheese from Whole Foods and some pitted olives at Binnys (plain; didn't have to pull out pimentos).
So, it was time for a martini. The blue cheese, Saint Agur from France is excellent--soft, so easy to press into the olives and with a good taste. The gin is quite fragrant, but I can't absolutely say significantly better than Bombay Sapphire. Soon, it will be time for a gin vs gin taste-off.
Put the gin in the fridge for several hours and I keep the vermouth in the fridge. Put the glass in the freezer for a few hours too.
I went with about 2.75 oz gin, 0.5 oz vermouth and 0.25 oz olive juice (Dirty Sue).

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0590.jpg
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0592.jpg
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0599.jpg

Clavius
04-10-2012, 20:17
Looks good minus the blue cheese! :lol:

AaronWF
04-10-2012, 20:40
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0599.jpg


Looks good minus the blue cheese! :lol:

Seriously... a bit o' cocktail with your olives?

jeff
04-11-2012, 16:17
9:1 ratio of Junipero gin to Bianco vermouth, shaken vigorously over ice.

Add 1 drop of Worcestershire sauce to glass and then shake most of it out, leaving only trace amounts in the glass.

Pour over 1 or 3 olives (must be an odd number.)

Enjoy!

bigtoys
04-11-2012, 21:22
Seriously... a bit o' cocktail with your olives?

gotta use the olives and cheese or they'll go bad. yeah, it's more an hors d'oeuvre than a cocktail. but it was tasty!! I'm definitely buying this blue cheese again.

bigtoys
04-12-2012, 08:26
9:1 ratio of Junipero gin to Bianco vermouth, shaken vigorously over ice.

Add 1 drop of Worcestershire sauce to glass and then shake most of it out, leaving only trace amounts in the glass.

Pour over 1 or 3 olives (must be an odd number.)

Enjoy!

oops. Forgot about the odd olive number thing.
Worcestershire---interesting:bigeyes:

Trey Manthey
04-15-2012, 18:23
My martini:


Start by chilling the glasses with ice and water
Fill a mixing glass with ice and pour Tanqueray down the side of the glass; don't let it bruise the ice
Stir gently until the glass is cold enough for a towel to freeze to the condensation on the glass
Discard ice in chilled glass, coat inside of glass with Noilly Pratt vermouth, discard extra
Strain chilled gin into glasses
Garnish with a lemon twist

pepcycle
04-16-2012, 09:23
Just started drinking my martini's OTR.
Preferably one large ice ball. (Golf ball sized)

I prepare the same as Up version and strain into chilled OTR glass with Olives.

I find the shorter, lighter OTR glass to the bulky, heavy bottomed style.

Gillman
04-16-2012, 11:39
I like gin, a little vermouth (but always some), rocks. Stuffed olive optional, never really liked lemon. If the gin is too pungent, I let it down a bit with vodka. That's it.

Gary

bigtoys
06-09-2012, 16:13
Dirty & Sloppy
stuffed some olives w/ St. Agur blue cheese from Whole Foods
Hendricks Gin (from the freezer), Dolin Dry Vermouth, some generic olive brine
I know, more like an appetizer than a cocktail

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0838.jpg

with ceviche from the local grocer
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/sunsetceviche.jpg

BourbonJoe
06-09-2012, 16:49
I like a Bombay Saphire martini, mixed 3 to 1 with dry vermouth, a splash of olive juice and three large olives. All on the rocks.
Joe :usflag:

Rutherford
06-10-2012, 16:18
I like to have a good, complex, balanced aroma with correspondingly good flavor.

To get this in a martini, I think the first step is to get a reasonable temperature. Stirring helps keep a martini from getting too diluted or too cold.

I'd rather have a bit more vermouth for its added aromatics -- somewhere in the 3-4:1 range works best for me. There is no better gin than Martin Miller's (at least that I've found... I've only had probably 20 gins), which has a beautiful floral bouquet and some more spicy, earthy tones in addition to its juniper. Plymouth is another good well-balanced floral gin but is not quite as good. Beefeater and Broker's are good choices for cleaner, more juniper-focused gin. Any vermouth that isn't lower-shelf works for me. Noilly Prat works well and is especially dry. Martini & Rossi is pretty good. Lillet technically doesn't call itself gin, but works quite well in vermouth's place.

A twist is my favorite garnish. Cocktail onions are decent and less work (though technically they make your drink a Gibson). I prefer no garnish to olives, and sometimes to an onion.

A dash of bitters can bring together the gin and vermouth quite well. Angostura or orange bitters (Regans is better than Fee Brothers, but Fee Brothers is qutie good) work the best. I don't think Fee Brothers or Peychaud's work particularly well in martinis. Bittercube Cherry Bark Vanilla bitters are delicious in almost anything.

A small amount of St. Germain can enhance the aromatics of a martini and, according to some, make it no longer a martini. Too much can oversweeten the drink.

HP12
06-10-2012, 17:45
I like my martini's "filthy dirty".
Sapphire Gin, vermouth and green olive juice...roughly 3:1:1+

Queen sized olives a must and stuffed with either blue cheese or anchovies (hard to believe no others mentioned this delicious variation).

Shaken not stirred and poured into a chilled martini glass. The shake is an important part of the martini making process. Providing good aeration with the resulting pour producing a light layer of ice crystals in the glass makes for a classic favorite.

Martinis are great when made correctly.

Clavius
06-10-2012, 18:50
I bought a bottle of this Luksusowa Potato Vodka for like $16.99 earlier today. It's highly rated... supposedly. I figured it might be pretty good but not nearly as good as maybe Rain or Chopin. I'm dead wrong. This is good, clean and smooth vodka. I'm sold on it.

For the record, the Martini I made with it was like this:
-3oz Luksusowa Vodka
-1/2oz M&R Dry Vermouth
-1/4oz Stirrings Dirty Martini mix (olive brine)
Shaken vigorously

Garnish was Mezzetta Jalapeno & Garlic Olives (which are amazing, btw)

BoozeTraveler
07-30-2012, 17:52
Filthy, dry and up. I prefer a vodka martini, though the right gin will make it sing.

Happyhour24x7
07-31-2012, 03:27
I had no idea there was so much love for the olive brine out there. I like olives, and have been known to stick a couple in a vodka rocks, but wash them first, please. And by no means let those things near my gin martinis!

Clavius
07-31-2012, 15:30
I had no idea there was so much love for the olive brine out there. I like olives, and have been known to stick a couple in a vodka rocks, but wash them first, please. And by no means let those things near my gin martinis!

I like a little of the brine in my martinis. But it is very easy to add too much.

bigtoys
08-05-2012, 20:32
nice to see some summer responses! keep'em coming.

LikeItWasSodaPop
08-05-2012, 23:37
Bar DeVille in Chicago is known for being a better than decent mixology bar without being too pretentious. But I was in there with a super hot girl who loves dirty martinis. Owner/bartender nearly spat in my face for asking for one. "We don't carry olives," he says. They have a couple PHC vintages, etc., but no olives. Talk about cocktail originalism / snobbery, what have you.

Love this thread for seeing the vast differences between people's various conceptions of martinis. Difference of opinion is great. But I wouldn't deny my customers what they ask for if I owned a bar.

Needless to say, I haven't been back!

MrAtomic
08-08-2012, 16:47
Bar DeVille in Chicago is known for being a better than decent mixology bar without being too pretentious. But I was in there with a super hot girl who loves dirty martinis. Owner/bartender nearly spat in my face for asking for one. "We don't carry olives," he says.

This bartender's oafishness cheesed me off enough to dig out my copy of Crosby Gaige's Standard Cocktail Guide (1944). Gaige was, I believe, a Broadway producer, dedicated booze-hound, and pig-out artist. I thought I'd cite Gaige's use of olives in a Martini as evidence that the Bar De Ville is stocked with pretentious clowns. But I see that Gaige suggests serving a dry Martini (2 oz gin, 3/4 oz dry vermouth, stirred over cracked ice) with a lemon twist, and a sweet Martini (2 oz gin, 3/4 oz sweet vermouth, stirred) with a cherry. Hmmm....

You know what? I don't care what Crosby Gaige has to say. That bartender was a jerk.

BoozeTraveler
08-08-2012, 22:04
Owner/bartender nearly spat in my face for asking for one. "We don't carry olives," he says. They have a couple PHC vintages, etc., but no olives. Talk about cocktail originalism / snobbery, what have you.

I refer to these nouveau "mixologist" speakeasy wannabe types as bardouches. Just like the new crowd of beer snobs, the "speakeasy" crowd that think they know everything there is to know and that everybody else is a bunch of idiots rankle me to no end.

Trey Manthey
08-09-2012, 07:01
I refer to these nouveau "mixologist" speakeasy wannabe types as bardouches. Just like the new crowd of beer snobs, the "speakeasy" crowd that think they know everything there is to know and that everybody else is a bunch of idiots rankle me to no end.

I have seen my share of "bardouches", as I am doing informal research to open my own mixology bar. I also generally agree that a bartender is there to prepare drinks at your pleasure.

However, just like I wouldn't order a mac'n'cheese off menu at an upscale gastropub, or a Boulevardier at a dive bar, you have to have some respect for the owner's concept for the venue. He made a decision to not carry olives. Maybe he thought that's not how a martini should be served. That filling a glass with brine overpowers the beverage (even though sometimes that's just what you want). Maybe he's just a snob. Whatever the case, he does sound like a jerk, and he could have been much more polite and helpful.

I was recently a very good speakeasy bar in Nashville, when two guys sat down at the bar next to me and ordered Bacardi and cokes before they had a chance to even look at the menu of 50+ incredible cocktails (which included detailed recipes and descriptions of each one). Instead of spitting, this employee politely explained that they didn't carry Bacardi, but only a special single barrel rum. The guy argued that he had ordered a Bacardi and coke last time he'd been there (which I would bet my life was "never"). Still the bartender patiently deferred to the cocktail list to recommend another drink. When the guy asked for a Red Bull and vodka, I thought he'd blow his top, but he managed to carefully steer him towards a mojito or a dark n' stormy, I think. In this case, the bardouche was the customer.

To stay on topic, I've recently cracked open a new bottle of Martin Miller's Westbourne strength gin. Last weekend, I made a couple martinis for myself and my friend with this in our favorite style. Stirred slowly over large chunks of cracked ice, a hint of Noilly Prat, poured into two well chilled cocktail glasses. Garnish with a long strip of lemon. It really celebrates the flavors in the gin.

BourbonJoe
08-09-2012, 18:55
First of all, I like them on the rocks. Coat the rocks generously with dry vermouth. Add Bombay Sapphire Gin, a splash of olive juice. Put three large olives on a stick to stir. Ya Mon...
Joe :usflag:

ratcheer
08-11-2012, 07:48
... a sweet Martini (2 oz gin, 3/4 oz sweet vermouth, stirred) with a cherry. Hmmm....


Oddly, I had never heard of a sweet martini in my 45 years or so of drinking, but I tried this the other day and it was delicious. No cherry, though. I just used Tanqueray gin and M&R Red.

Tim

univibe88
08-11-2012, 13:38
Like my women - dirty and full of gin!

Joking aside, I don't prefer a dirty martini. I do like olives...garlic stuffed. I also like to wipe the rim with a piece of lemon peal and squeeze it over the drink, cascading tiny droplets of lemon oil across the top. But I discard the lemon. I don't put it in the martini.

Orange bitters are a must.

Beefeater is my go to. Boodles is also quite nice.

FWIW I consulted my copy of "The Official Mixer's Manual" by Patrick Gavin Duffy, copyright 1934. The martini recipe therein calls for 2/3 dry gin, 1/3 French vermouth, 1 dash orange bitters, stir with ice, strain and garnish with an olive.

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p202/redhook88/98aa7b2c.jpg

MrAtomic
08-14-2012, 13:15
Oddly, I had never heard of a sweet martini in my 45 years or so of drinking, but I tried this the other day and it was delicious. No cherry, though. I just used Tanqueray gin and M&R Red.

Tim

Tim, glad to hear that you liked it. I'll have to give it a try. Crosby Gaige's book has some very interesting recipes, and if you're interested in others, let me know. In keeping with the theme of this thread, here's another one of his mutated Martinis called "The Bronx Cocktail" -- 1 oz dry gin, 3/4 oz sweet vermouth, 3/4 oz dry vermouth, 1/2 oz orange juice. Shake with cracked ice.

Clavius
08-15-2012, 19:00
FWIW I consulted my copy of "The Official Mixer's Manual" by Patrick Gavin Duffy, copyright 1934. The martini recipe therein calls for 2/3 dry gin, 1/3 French vermouth, 1 dash orange bitters, stir with ice, strain and garnish with an olive.

I love trying new martini recipes! I need to upgrade my vermouth selection from Martini to Noilly Prat. And I'll have to find some orange bitters. But I definitely want to give this recipe a try.

univibe88
08-16-2012, 04:54
Noilly Prat is my preference. It is more or less the same price as Rossi. I like to keep it in the fridge. I feel it keeps it fresher. Fortunately orange bitters are easily available at any better liquor store. I remember having to search like crazy for them 10 years ago.

As for the 2/3 to 1/3 gin to vermouth ratio, feel free to play with it. I like vermouth, but that is a LOT. Personally, I like 3oz gin to 1/2 oz vermouth.

Here is another recipe I just discovered last night, but haven't tried it yet.

Colony Martini
3oz gin
1 bar spoon absinthe
4 dashes orange bitters

bigtoys
03-12-2013, 09:52
Yes, those are blue tipped olive picks (showing a little wear in the picture, although not so evident to the naked eye) with a blue based glass and bleu cheese stuffed olives for my Bombay Sapphire dirty martini (Dolin vermouth). I know, looks more like an hors d'oeuvre than a drink. So be it. It's tasty. Even got a couple of ice shards to form in the shaker.:skep:
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMG_20130311_173947_934-1_zps6d323092.jpg

tanstaafl2
03-12-2013, 10:05
Sounds like you need to try a bottle of Magellan Blue gin (http://www.magellanbluegin.com/about.html) to complete your blue motif! It doesn't just have blue in the name but instead is a true blue gin from France at a nice 88 proof.

The blue color is not artificial but instead comes from the petals of the Iris flower. Iris root is also one of the botanicals used to make this unusual gin.

ratcheer
03-15-2013, 04:35
There's a great martini article on Slate, this week. Seven parts.

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/drink/features/2013/martini_madness/martini_madness_introducing_slate_s_interactive_co cktail_tournament.html

Tim

squire
03-15-2013, 05:17
A friend has a simple martini recipe, he keeps a bottle of gin in the freezer. That's it.

omgmarclol
03-16-2013, 22:08
2:1. i like the gin and vermouth interplay. also a dash of orange bitters does wonders. i prefer martin miller's westbourne strength for martinis.

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b178/myambao/bar/IMG_2526_zps2e1c904a.jpg

Special Reserve
03-17-2013, 10:49
Usually in someone else's glass. When I did drink martinis I like cold gin with as little vermouth as possible and a couple of olives.

Back in prehistoric times I had a boss that would take his staff to Joe Muer's (in Detroit, now gone) to lunch and they made a great martinis. We never left with less than two.

Boy, those were the days.