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Jono
02-20-2012, 14:29
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/jf800382m

Characterization of the Most Odor-Active Compounds in an American Bourbon Whisky (whiskey!) by Application of the Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis

Luigi Poisson and Peter Schieberle*
Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Lebensmittelchemie, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85748 Garching, Germany
J. Agric. Food Chem., 2008, 56 (14), pp 5813–5819
DOI: 10.1021/jf800382m
Publication Date (Web): June 21, 2008
Copyright 2008 American Chemical Society

Table 1. Most Odor-Active (FD ≥ 32) Volatile Constituents Identified in Bourbon Whisky (whiskey!)

This table lists the components responsible for tasting notes, such as:

8 3-methylbutyl acetate fruity
21 α-damasconef cooked apple
27 (3S,4R)-trans-whiskylactone coconut-like
35 γ-decalactone peach-like
36 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol clove-like

There are usually several compounds in each category. The "banana" and/or pear notes are associated with 3-methylbutyl acetate.

sob0728
02-21-2012, 11:17
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/jf800382m

Characterization of the Most Odor-Active Compounds in an American Bourbon Whisky (whiskey!) by Application of the Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis

Luigi Poisson and Peter Schieberle*
Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Lebensmittelchemie, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85748 Garching, Germany
J. Agric. Food Chem., 2008, 56 (14), pp 58135819
DOI: 10.1021/jf800382m
Publication Date (Web): June 21, 2008
Copyright 2008 American Chemical Society

Table 1. Most Odor-Active (FD ≥ 32) Volatile Constituents Identified in Bourbon Whisky (whiskey!)

This table lists the components responsible for tasting notes, such as:

8 3-methylbutyl acetate fruity
21 α-damasconef cooked apple
27 (3S,4R)-trans-whiskylactone coconut-like
35 γ-decalactone peach-like
36 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol clove-like

There are usually several compounds in each category. The "banana" and/or pear notes are associated with 3-methylbutyl acetate.

You know, there are active volatile deniers out there. I don't know if I would believe this study, it seems like it has an alternate agenda and that it is in the pocket of Big Whiskey.

Jono
02-21-2012, 11:50
http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/News/2008/July/30070801.asp

It appears one of the results of the study was noting:

"Some of the desirable flavour compounds, they find, are degraded as the bourbon is produced - so they are hoping to work out whether the processing can be changed to save them."

In the future, there may be whiskeys with more assertive flavors. Whether this is good or bad will take quite a bit of experimentation.

Jono
02-21-2012, 14:21
Another good summary:

http://beerandwood.com/
beerandwood.com/got-wood.doc

Got wood?
Aging beer with oak and other woods

3. DECONSTRUCTING WOOD

Besides the aroma/flavor components it also discusses the attributes or issues with different wood for aging....

4. WOOD VARIETIES

Cherry and Nutwood look interesting for what they contribute.

This could be employed in a home barreling experiment...toasted chips etc.

ILLfarmboy
02-21-2012, 20:15
You know, there are active volatile deniers out there. I don't know if I would believe this study, it seems like it has an alternate agenda and that it is in the pocket of Big Whiskey.

Ah, but the whiskey was not computer simulated hooch, was it.

Anyhow, thanks for the post, Jono.

Your becoming the Alton Brown of SB.com. Keep those posts coming.

Jono
02-22-2012, 06:59
It reminds of Star Trek where you could have any food or beverage generated by the Replicator:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Replicator_(Star_Trek)

I prefer Gordon Ramsay but tip my hat to Alton Brown's food science.