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MJL
02-20-2012, 19:20
I would like to provide my expriences and ask if others can concurr or disagree.
I decided to change my tasting glasses. I chose to use, for my new glasses, the Riedel "Gourmet Glass" non-lead shaped glass. Well, talk about remarkable. I have found flavors and aromoas emerge that I had not anticipated. Indeed, I am not a big believer in things like glasses altering the flavors of the spirits but I am not rethinking that thought. Have others had similar experiences? I had been using Glencarin shaped glasses but I am not a believer in these Riedel glasses.

JayMonster
02-21-2012, 15:54
Well, I can't exactly concur or disagree, because who am I (or anyone else) to tell you that you don't know what you experienced. That being said, I am not a big believer in a certain glass being right or wrong (except an empty glass... That is just wrong.)

There are just so many variables at play. This is a new glass, so we naturally have a tendency towards excitement over the new element. After all, you didn't get this new glass with the thought, "This is gonna suck. " So you are already starting with a better mood, and now you are also probably paying attention to look for the "differences" and thus are paying closer attention.

Plus there is just the differences in "taste" and preferences for one type of glass or another. Some like the this glass, others find the Glencairn is more to their style, while others are content with a rocks glass (even when drinking neat), and still others contend a flask, so they always have their drink near at hand is best.

So what is the best? The one you are happiest with (prefereavly filled with a bourbon you enjoy)

Jono
02-21-2012, 16:18
I think the thickness of the lip and shape have an initial effect. Certainly, aromas are influenced be it whiskey or wine. A blind taste test would be one way to judge.

http://rumproject.com/menuitem3.html

Chapter Three:
Tasting and Glasses

A Rum experiment

Young Blacksmith
02-21-2012, 18:24
I've been using a Bulleit Bourbon glass since last summer, and have really enjoyed it. For comparison tonight I pulled out a Glenncairn and did some OFor 100 proof side by side. The BB glass opened up faster, allowed me to smell the butterscotch and vanilla faster, while the Glenncairn held the alcohol for a good 5 minutes more. I finished my BB pour while the Glencairn was still opening up. Yum! Then I waited until the candy became present in the second glass. The taste was the same while the aroma was the same, but when the alcohol was super present on the nose it was harsh tasting.

Interesting, and shows me the glass does have an effect on the perceived flavors due to aroma and nose as you take a sip.

Jono
02-21-2012, 18:49
To do a "blind" tasting you would have to be blindfolded and someone else hold the glass and bring it up to nose and to taste...tricky.

Bourbon Boiler
02-22-2012, 17:31
I certainly notice a difference in the nose, which as we all know influnces the perception of the taste. If you're drinking something chilled or on the rocks, the glass can also influence how long the drink stays at a give temperature.

Brisko
02-23-2012, 06:43
The big factor is how the aromas get concentrated, obviously, but another factor is how the rim. Specifically, how it influences where the spirit hits the tongue first and in what quantity. I know Riedel has a few different rim profiles (compare their single malt glass to their Spirits glass, for instance). If the rim directs the liquid to the front of the tongue first, you'll get a far different entry experience than if it more or less hits the whole tongue at once. I suppose the easiest illustration would be to compare a rocks glass to a Glencairn or a small wine glass.

BFerguson
02-24-2012, 03:57
Well, I can't exactly concur or disagree, because who am I (or anyone else) to tell you that you don't know what you experienced. That being said, I am not a big believer in a certain glass being right or wrong (except an empty glass... That is just wrong.)

There are just so many variables at play. This is a new glass, so we naturally have a tendency towards excitement over the new element. After all, you didn't get this new glass with the thought, "This is gonna suck. " So you are already starting with a better mood, and now you are also probably paying attention to look for the "differences" and thus are paying closer attention.

Plus there is just the differences in "taste" and preferences for one type of glass or another. Some like the this glass, others find the Glencairn is more to their style, while others are content with a rocks glass (even when drinking neat), and still others contend a flask, so they always have their drink near at hand is best.

So what is the best? The one you are happiest with (prefereavly filled with a bourbon you enjoy)

From my own experience, I think the more you experience the different types of glass styles, along with whatever bourbon of the day you were pouring, you do over time set up some concrete expectations in your minds tasting profile.

I'm partial to using Riedel Ouverture Bourbon glasses at home, and have set expectations on how things taste.

If I order bourbon with dinner if dining out, it generally will come in a standard rocks glass, and to me, at least, does not often fit that expected taste profile that I have experienced at home and have come to expect. Granted, every bottle is different, but many times its not even close.

I don't usually think "this is gonna suck", but have been let down by that taste not being what I expected.

More often than not, I do think "this is going to suck" due to the lack of bourbon selection :grin:

B

JayMonster
02-24-2012, 04:18
From my own experience, I think the more you experience the different types of glass styles, along with whatever bourbon of the day you were pouring, you do over time set up some concrete expectations in your minds tasting profile.

I'm partial to using Riedel Ouverture Bourbon glasses at home, and have set expectations on how things taste.

If I order bourbon with dinner if dining out, it generally will come in a standard rocks glass, and to me, at least, does not often fit that expected taste profile that I have experienced at home and have come to expect. Granted, every bottle is different, but many times its not even close.

I don't usually think "this is gonna suck", but have been let down by that taste not being what I expected.

More often than not, I do think "this is going to suck" due to the lack of bourbon selection :grin:

B

I probably wasn't as clear as I thought. Yes, a glass can have some effect on nose amd perception if you are accustomed to something else. Because, sure you need to let something breathe for a lot longer in a Glencairn glass than a rocks glass, and if you expect that more intense nose from a bowl then an open ended glass may leave you feeling let down.

What I was trying to say, though is that there is no one "right" glass, just the one that works best for you.

greens
02-24-2012, 11:03
I find the proper glass to play a very important role in enhancing the nose of the bourbon, thus enhancing the flavor from the two senses working together. I also have discovered that pouring about 15-20 minutes prior to enjoying plays a noticeable role as well, allowing the spirit to breathe and develop additional flavor profiles. Another thing I have found that enhances the taste, from reading here on the forum, that I have incorporated lately, is the warming of the bourbon from your hands through the glass.

I have found from experimentation that the glass that works best for me is the Duvel Tulip designed for Belgian beers. I actually drink most everything out of this glass now, except for maybe wine. The shape of the glass allows for cradling it easily in your palms and provides enough surface area to warm the bourbon. Plus the shape allows for easy breathing and generates an amazing aroma.

I used the Riedel glasses many years ago when I solely drank Tequila. I found them to overpriced and overrated. Not to mention they break way too easily. The Duvel Tulip is still the best I have found for enjoying spirits. It's like a modified snifter that is superior in all aspects.

Jono
02-24-2012, 13:06
It looks quite large...http://beergeekshop.com/duvel-glass/

Bourbon Boiler
02-24-2012, 16:20
It looks quite large...http://beergeekshop.com/duvel-glass/

You're right. Any bourbon will have a powerful nose if you're smelling this much of it.

http://beergeekshop.com/files/2011/10/duvel-glass-3-150x150.jpg

greens
02-24-2012, 21:14
It looks quite large...http://beergeekshop.com/duvel-glass/

It definitely is. You learn to eyeball the appropriate amount for a decent pour after using it a few times.

MJL
02-25-2012, 07:00
I have to totally agree with those who comment that the Reidel glasses are WAY overpriced. I would never, ever pay retail on these. Hell, I don't even pay the discounter prices. I buy these when they go on big closeouts. That said I also very much like the Spieglau and a very other brands of better crystal that seem to be manufacturing glasses specific to spirit. Personally I find there is much to dislike about the Glencairan glass. I want a glass with a stem as I do NOT want the spirit warmed by my hand. Second, I want a glass with a mout large enough that I can jam my entire nose into to grab the evaporating essences off the spirit. Third, I want a glass with a thin rim as I think, at least in my case, this allows me to more succesfully aerate the spirit. Last, I want a larger bowl than a Glencairan offers.

What I find remarkable is that glasses of differing shapes seem to offer sensory experiences in a much more enhanced or subdued fashion. I have noticed, in examining photos of the glasses used at distilleries to sample the quality of their own product, that the use of a short stemmed glass, similar to the Reidel gourmet seems to be widely in use. This is what stimulated me to buy these in the first place.

MJL
02-25-2012, 08:36
I thought I would add that I really see the influence of glass sizes/shapes in tasting Scotches.

JayMonster
02-25-2012, 11:57
One thing has certainly become clear to me on this thread... I am not, nor will I ever be in the class of "enthusiast" that some of you are.

Sure, I get different strokes for different folks and all that... But, research into different types of glasses? Really?

If using or not using a specific type of glass is going to change the fact that I will or won't like a particular bourbon... I'll pass on that bourbon. There are plenty of others out there that are great without having to make it a chore to drink them. If it is just your routing that you enjoy, pouring into a certain glass, sitting there by the fireplace with your smoking jacket on, reading some long dead poet... then more power to you... but if you have to set things up just so in order just to like something, that is just too much work for me.

What glass I use will vary depending on mood or environment. Yup, I have a glencairn glass when I am in my "tasting" mode, I have a rocks glass when I am sipping and watching TV, and I have a heavy thick glass that almost looks like a mason jar that I picked up at some restaurant when I am working down in my "shop" (basement). And, I guess I am not sofisticated enough to realize it, but as far as I can tell, I enjoy my bourbon just as much regardless of what container is holding it. Is the experience different... yeah... and so is the environment... but the bourbon... it is all still good.

Steve99
02-25-2012, 14:12
Second, I want a glass with a mout large enough that I can jam my entire nose into to grab the evaporating essences off the spirit. Third, I want a glass with a thin rim as I think, at least in my case, this allows me to more succesfully aerate the spirit. Last, I want a larger bowl than a Glencairan offers.

Have you looked at the Neat Glass? http://www.theneatglass.com/ It would seem to meet many of your criteria.

I just got mine -- I'm still kind of getting used to it. I like the heft and feel of the glass. It's got a very nice wide bowl. I thought the wide lip would make it tough to drink out of, but that's not a problem. I would say it does a good job of eliminating the alcohol burn in the nose. You can eaily get your nose all the way in. However, I'm not convinced it improves getting all of the aromas.

Other downside is that they definitely seem overpriced!

Steve

ebo
02-25-2012, 15:45
What glass I use will vary depending on mood or environment. Yup, I have a glencairn glass when I am in my "tasting" mode, I have a rocks glass when I am sipping and watching TV, and I have a heavy thick glass that almost looks like a mason jar that I picked up at some restaurant when I am working down in my "shop" (basement). And, I guess I am not sofisticated enough to realize it, but as far as I can tell, I enjoy my bourbon just as much regardless of what container is holding it. Is the experience different... yeah... and so is the environment... but the bourbon... it is all still good.


I don't think anyone that responded in this thread thinks or said anything different?

Brisko
02-25-2012, 23:25
I thought I would add that I really see the influence of glass sizes/shapes in tasting Scotches.

Same here. I usually use a sherry copita for scotch and a larger bowled (but relatively small) stemless wineglass for bourbon. A lot of times I'll use a rocks glass for bourbon, too. Bourbon and rye hav(generally speaking) more powerful nose and tend to be a little overwhelming in a narrow glaas like a glencairn or a copita. Just my opinion, though, mileage may vary.

p_elliott
02-26-2012, 03:05
Have you looked at the Neat Glass? http://www.theneatglass.com/ It would seem to meet many of your criteria.

I just got mine -- I'm still kind of getting used to it. I like the heft and feel of the glass. It's got a very nice wide bowl. I thought the wide lip would make it tough to drink out of, but that's not a problem. I would say it does a good job of eliminating the alcohol burn in the nose. You can eaily get your nose all the way in. However, I'm not convinced it improves getting all of the aromas.

Other downside is that they definitely seem overpriced!

Steve


Looks like it should have a fish in it

MarkEdwards
02-26-2012, 03:44
I definitely prefer a Glencairn over a rocks glass. When I first started tasting, I was using a rocks glass. One of my early experiences was with Makers Mark, which I found unimpressive. The next time I tried MM in a Glencairn glass, I found the MM to be much improved.

I now do all my tasting in a Glencairn glass, and feel it adds to the experience in a positive way.

BourbonGuy
02-27-2012, 08:42
What was the stemless glass than John Hansell used in the Modern Marvels Whiskey DVD?

I have been trying to develop my sense of smell. So I would think the glass used for nosing play a bigger role than someone just sitting with friends sipping a bourbon you have had numerous times before.

leebo
02-27-2012, 16:52
I find a white wine glass to fit the bill nicely. I sometimes use a stemless white wine glasses too. The riedel chardonay is nice, mine was about $12.00 for 2.

StraightNoChaser
02-27-2012, 17:14
Pretty partial to snifters myself. I think it's more an affinity and connection to the style if anything else. But I did compare a glencairn to a snifter once and preferred the snifter for its ability to give me a deeper nose with the wider surface area

nblair
02-27-2012, 18:14
What was the stemless glass than John Hansell used in the Modern Marvels Whiskey DVD?

I don't know the name of that glass, but the Liquor Barn in Louisville sells similar glasses for about $2. I usually reach for them over my glencairns.

dmarkle
02-27-2012, 18:58
Put me down squarely in the Glencairn camp, though buyer beware. There are at least two Glencairns out there -- one which is simple molded glass and one which is "crystal". The glass ones are thicker, have a rounded lip, and usually come in gift sets or some other such thing (mine came from a Glenfiddich gift set). The crystal ones have a thinner, sharper lip. I prefer the crystal ones myself.

As far as the type of glass itself, I'm more concerned about what the glass *doesn't* do than what it does. A rocks glass, or a wide-mouthed snifter or wine glass will tend to put your face in the whiskey vapors, and for me, this highlights the burn of the alcohol, and can be off-putting, especially as the proof gets higher. IMO you can really ruin the concentrated, full nose of a fine barrel proof whiskey by throwing it into a rocks glass.

I like a small mouth to the glass -- most tasting glasses, the Glencairns, or those Reidel whiskey glasses are like that -- they concentrate the nose without blasting you with alcohol.

Why do I like the Glencairns? Truth be told, I don't care about having cool or cold whiskey, so I don't mind the stemlessness one bit. They're more durable then stemmed glasses, and after a few, you'll likely appreciate that. They have a nice big bowl to them. They look cool. They are heavily weighted at the bottom so they are unlikely to tip. Again, after a few, you will appreciate this feature more. And they notch really well in the hand. In fact, I was watching TV one night with my Glencairn in hand, and woke up three hours later -- the Glencairn hadn't moved! I hadn't spilled a drop! What else could be a better testament? :)



It's all personal. Your mileage may vary. My opinion is worth what you paid for it!

BourbonGuy
02-29-2012, 09:37
I don't know the name of that glass, but the Liquor Barn in Louisville sells similar glasses for about $2. I usually reach for them over my glencairns.

Thank you, but I am in New York (Long Island)
I went to their site, but did not see them.
Maybe John will read this and chime in.

MJL
03-01-2012, 02:45
Well, I'm thinking different glasses have different purposes. Sometimes I really want to analyze the nose and really sort out what is going on with a specific spirit. On the other hand, sometimes I just want to watch TV, have some brown booze with ice and relax. I find that I must turn off fans (hey I live in Florida, we have fans on all the time) the TV, computer, etc to be able to really focus on what I am tasting. I break out the "tasting" glasses at that moment. The rocks glasses are just fine for watching Casablanca or the Maltese Falcon, when I am watching movies and want to focus on the movie and not the booze.