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Clavius
03-14-2012, 19:54
I did a search and didn't see a current wine thread. So here we go! What wine are you drinking?

Tonight for me, as a change from bourbon, I'm drinking a 2008 bottle of Maison Louis Latour Domaine de Valmoissine Pinot Noir. Nothing fancy and it was on clearance at my local store. That's the main reason I bought it as I'm not a huge pinot fan. It's ok, kind of one dimensional IMHO. I really prefer big, bold cabernets.

dridge11
03-16-2012, 14:53
Had a little 2006 Pride Cabernet Franc with friends last night. Now I'm sipping on 1997 Salon Le Mesnil while I finish up some work at the office.

Tico
03-16-2012, 15:13
salon at work = win!

just got a nice shipment from rhys and copain this week so I may crack one while playing with my new ipad 3 tonight :cool:

bigtoys
03-28-2012, 18:34
Last bottles were The Hattrick, a Napa Blend (Cab Sauvignon, Merlot, Cab Franc) from Miner (with international hockey star Igol Larionov) and Maple Lane 2008, another Napa Cab. The ML was great; unfortunately it's sold out and we only bought 2 bottles.

Just bought another bottle of Cakebread Dancing Bear Ranch, another Napa blend we like. To keep the other 600+ bottles company in the basement. Like we needed it.

Restaurant man
03-28-2012, 20:10
Last bottles were The Hattrick, a Napa Blend (Cab Sauvignon, Merlot, Cab Franc) from Miner (with international hockey star Igol Larionov) and Maple Lane 2008, another Napa Cab. The ML was great; unfortunately it's sold out and we only bought 2 bottles.

Just bought another bottle of Cakebread Dancing Bear Ranch, another Napa blend we like. To keep the other 600+ bottles company in the basement. Like we needed it.

I've seen the maple lane on wtso.com
If your not familiar with the site, then u need to get familiar. It is insanely good.

hilega
03-31-2012, 14:02
2010 Babcock Deja Vu Pinot Noir

Sent from my DROID2 GLOBAL using Tapatalk

Parkersback
03-31-2012, 15:37
I know almost nothing about wine, but I would love to hear any suggestions from the board about a "house" red, an everyday drinker, not too dry, under $10.

Dramiel McHinson
03-31-2012, 19:36
Just broke into a 2007 V. Sattui off dry reisling. Really nice and fruity with A crisp finish.

bigtoys
03-31-2012, 19:36
I've seen the maple lane on wtso.com
If your not familiar with the site, then u need to get familiar. It is insanely good.

thanks for the tip. registered. interesting concept, selling one wine at a time.

opened a half bottle of Rubicon Estate 2006 Cask Cabernet, a consistently good Napa Cab. Very smooth, little tannins.
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0569-1.jpg

Originally known as Inglenook when established by Gustave Niebaum in 1879, Francis Ford Coppola bought it in 1975 and it became Niebaum-Coppola. It was renamed Rubicon Estate in 2006, but in 2011, FFC bought back the Inglenook name and it's now known as Inglenook again.

camduncan
03-31-2012, 20:29
I don't drink much wine, but my wife loves it..... Since trying it in Hawaii, she's become a give fan of Callifornian White Zinfandel. Until this year we've never been able to find one on the Aussie market, but it looks like the Gallo Family Vinyard variety is now permanently available.
Otherwise, she's working her way through the enormous range of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc's that are available here.

Clavius
03-31-2012, 21:15
Otherwise, she's working her way through the enormous range of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc's that are available here.
There are some GREAT New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc's out there! I bet you're able to get the best of them being so close.

camduncan
04-01-2012, 00:28
There are some GREAT New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc's out there! I bet you're able to get the best of them being so close.

We get a very large selection here, and are quite spoilt if NZ wines are to your taste.... but it's nothing compared to what we get when we visit the South Island of NZ.. The stuff there is amazing!

Tico
04-10-2012, 22:33
Polished off a bottle of 2006 Gibourg Vosne Romanee tonight with the wife, no bourbon tonight.

camduncan
04-10-2012, 23:38
Does Port count? I've been enjoying a glass or two of Rumbalara Tawny port from Rumbalara Wines (a local place a few hours drive from here)

sutton
04-11-2012, 05:34
On Sunday, A 2006 Mt. Eden Vineyards Santa Cruz Mtn. Chardonnay and 2002 Chateau Montelena Estate Cab with the Easter lamb ... very nice.

Clavius
04-11-2012, 18:17
and 2002 Chateau Montelena Estate Cab with the Easter lamb ... very nice.
Awesome. Never had Chateau Montelena but I hear it's very good.

sutton
04-11-2012, 18:24
Awesome. Never had Chateau Montelena but I hear it's very good.

I've always found it to be excellent - they also make a Chardonnay that I don't believe (or at least rarely) goes through malolactic fermentation - a great pairing with oysters. I also love their Zin ...

Dramiel McHinson
04-12-2012, 18:31
Popped the cork on a 2006 Peju Provence. This is a blended red from the Napa area. Really delightful wine. Nice earthy fruit taste with a hint of chocolate and cinnamon.

Max Power
04-12-2012, 19:21
Not enough of them. Marques de Caceres Rioja was the last one I had...and it is wonderful.

T Comp
04-12-2012, 21:28
On Sunday, A 2006 Mt. Eden Vineyards Santa Cruz Mtn. Chardonnay and 2002 Chateau Montelena Estate Cab with the Easter lamb ... very nice.


Awesome. Never had Chateau Montelena but I hear it's very good.


I've always found it to be excellent - they also make a Chardonnay that I don't believe (or at least rarely) goes through malolactic fermentation - a great pairing with oysters. I also love their Zin ...

Always loved and preferred the Montelena cabs over their old school competitors. The '02 Napa vintage was awfully special so that was some good drinking for sutton. I had bunkered a few of their non estate '02 cabs but they're gone now :cry:. For those whiskey drinkers that don't know it was their Chardonnay that was famous for taking first in in the 1976 Judgment in Paris competition and resulted in a great book and bad movie.

I've now fallen so hard for whiskey that budget wine is just fine to get me through dinner (and onto whiskey :grin: ) so that I rarely spend more than $10 for a bottle.

Tico
04-12-2012, 21:43
On Sunday, A 2006 Mt. Eden Vineyards Santa Cruz Mtn. Chardonnay and 2002 Chateau Montelena Estate Cab with the Easter lamb ... very nice.

Both of those wines are very good. Last time I had the 06 Mt. Eden it was shut down pretty hard and seemed like it needed a few more years to unwind.

sutton
04-13-2012, 06:14
Both of those wines are very good. Last time I had the 06 Mt. Eden it was shut down pretty hard and seemed like it needed a few more years to unwind.

Agree, it did open up over time - I opened it at cellar temp. (which right now is about 52 degrees), and it improved as it warmed a bit.

On your other point, I too have cut back substantially on the wine purchases. I find it interesting that wine (at least for some of the "more famous/sought after" names) can easily run $50-$75/bottle - and substantialy more if chasing cult Cabs, Bordeaux, Burgundy, Brunello, Barolo etc. They are also gone in one meal - but a $75 purchase for a bottle of straight bourbon or rye gets you something pretty amazing that lasts significantly longer and can last with significant empty space in the bottle with no ill effects.

We've been drinking down the cellar and making more of our own wine each year - my wine purchases focus now on the lesser known regions where you can still find value, but eventually even these will rise in price (look at Oregon Pinot Noir over the last 10-15 yrs). Lesson for the bourbon lover - prices can only go up as more discover the value hidden in these whiskeys.

(I also find it a bit odd that everything I prefer to drink starts with a "B" :grin: )

Clavius
04-27-2012, 18:32
Going cheap tonight! 2010 Sterling Vintner's Collection Central Coast Chardonnay.

White Dog
04-30-2012, 08:49
Great thread! (Just found, as I rarely visit this area.)

Over the weekend had many great bottles. Sinskey 2011 Vin Gris is much better than last year's, which was also good. Paired well with BBQ Chicken. Paul Achs 2009 St. Laurent was great with spaghetti of all things. And a Selbach 2009 Zelt. Himm. Kab. Halbtrocken was great all by itself.

Tico
04-30-2012, 08:57
Went over to my in-laws last night for dinner. Had a bottle of 2001 Arcadian Garys's Vineyard Pinot and a bottle of 1990 Beringer Private Reserve Cab.

The pinot was killer, probably drinking at peak or close to it. The Beringer seemed like it could use a few more years in the cellar.

dridge11
04-30-2012, 13:49
Did a little 2009 and 2010 Lapierre Morgon and some 09 Switchback Ridge Petite Sirah.

sutton
04-30-2012, 14:14
2004 Livio Sassetti Pertimali BdM and 2000 Elio Grasso Case Mate Barolo; paired well with grilled veal chops and wild mushrooms.

The BdM has many years left to evolve; the barolo imho is at its peak - both wines were fabulous examples of what these classic wine regions are capable of producing. Well-balanced and long-lived, secondary and (in the case of the barolo) tertiary characteristics in abundance on both nose and palate, and a silky texture.

dridge11
04-30-2012, 14:45
I tend to like Barolo better than BdM. We had a 1985 Marcarini Barolo Brunate earlier this year that was singing!

White Dog
04-30-2012, 17:43
Did a little 2009 and 2010 Lapierre Morgon and some 09 Switchback Ridge Petite Sirah.

Lapierre is one of the world's greatest estates, but no one is aware of that.:rolleyes:

Clavius
04-30-2012, 17:52
Damn, you guys drink some wines I can only dream of trying!

Tico
04-30-2012, 18:22
Did a little 2009 and 2010 Lapierre Morgon and some 09 Switchback Ridge Petite Sirah.

How were the morgons? I've got the 2009/2010 sleeping along with some of the 2009 cuvée MMIX. Are these starting to unwind or still need a bit of time?

sutton
05-01-2012, 05:50
I tend to like Barolo better than BdM. We had a 1985 Marcarini Barolo Brunate earlier this year that was singing!

I agree with you; a slight preference toward Barolo although I like both. I would say that in either case I generally favor and have had more luck with the more traditional producers when it comes to cellaring.

In my limited experience, although it may take longer for a more traditional producer's wines to reach their peak, they stay there longer; the decline is more gradual and graceful - you never seem to have to worry as much as to whether you let it go over the hill too far.

sutton
05-01-2012, 06:00
Damn, you guys drink some wines I can only dream of trying!

:grin: I know the feeling - I get the same feeling when reading about bourbon dusties...!

If you have a spot that stays reasonably cool and humid, you can build a little passive cellar if you want to buy a bottle or two to lay down for awhile. That is how I started - it grew slowly over the next 20 years. Before you know it, you'll have a nice little collection.

White Dog
05-01-2012, 11:37
How were the morgons? I've got the 2009/2010 sleeping along with some of the 2009 cuvée MMIX. Are these starting to unwind or still need a bit of time?

Had an 2009 Lapierre about a month ago. It will age well for another 10 years, IMHO.

AaronWF
05-01-2012, 14:08
Damn, you guys drink some wines I can only dream of trying!

I'm sure I'd dream of these wines if the labels were in Greek, because most of this thread is Greek to me.

I love wine, I have an idea of what to expect out of grapes and what grapes I generally prefer, but I'll be damned if I can keep track of names, estates, vintages, terroir, etc. I also am not in any kind of position to spend hundreds or even tens of dollars usually on a bottle that is consumed so quickly.

I'm mostly happy with what I can find in the $15-$25 range. I'm sure some of that pleasure might be spoiled if I knew what I was missing.

So hey, I'll just throw this out there to the wine snobs :grin:: Refer me to some sub-$20 bottles of anything. With red I prefer medium to light-bodied, but I like to taste the soil, and prefer a spice to oak in the heavier-bodied ones. With white, I'd love something round and refreshing with muted lemon and slightly creamy butter, but I hate oaky chardonnays.

But yeah, I'd love some affordable suggestions in any style! TIA!

dridge11
05-01-2012, 17:21
I'm mostly happy with what I can find in the $15-$25 range. I'm sure some of that pleasure might be spoiled if I knew what I was missing.

So hey, I'll just throw this out there to the wine snobs :grin:: Refer me to some sub-$20 bottles of anything. With red I prefer medium to light-bodied, but I like to taste the soil, and prefer a spice to oak in the heavier-bodied ones. With white, I'd love something round and refreshing with muted lemon and slightly creamy butter, but I hate oaky chardonnays.

But yeah, I'd love some affordable suggestions in any style! TIA!

Sounds like Lapierre Morgon to me!

The 2010 was SLOW to open up, but super tasty later in the evening and on day 2 and 3. The 2009 was a beauty as well. When we did the 2010 Lapierre the first night, it was side by side with the 2010 Foillard Morgon Cote du Py and the Foillard was our favorite all night long.

White Dog
05-01-2012, 19:38
I'm sure I'd dream of these wines if the labels were in Greek, because most of this thread is Greek to me.

I love wine, I have an idea of what to expect out of grapes and what grapes I generally prefer, but I'll be damned if I can keep track of names, estates, vintages, terroir, etc. I also am not in any kind of position to spend hundreds or even tens of dollars usually on a bottle that is consumed so quickly.

I'm mostly happy with what I can find in the $15-$25 range. I'm sure some of that pleasure might be spoiled if I knew what I was missing.

So hey, I'll just throw this out there to the wine snobs :grin:: Refer me to some sub-$20 bottles of anything. With red I prefer medium to light-bodied, but I like to taste the soil, and prefer a spice to oak in the heavier-bodied ones. With white, I'd love something round and refreshing with muted lemon and slightly creamy butter, but I hate oaky chardonnays.

But yeah, I'd love some affordable suggestions in any style! TIA!

Come on, Aaron. You're a Bourbon snob of the highest order, and you comment eloquently on every bourbon from current OGD to PHC Cognac Finish to High West 21yr. This thread is titled "What are you drinking?" not "What's a value pour?":grin:

That said, the Selbach that I referenced is $19.99, and the Lapierre Morgon can be had for $25.99. Neither would break your bank.

AaronWF
05-02-2012, 08:48
Sounds like Lapierre Morgon to me!

Thanks, I'll go look for it ASAP!


Come on, Aaron. You're a Bourbon snob of the highest order, and you comment eloquently on every bourbon from current OGD to PHC Cognac Finish to High West 21yr. This thread is titled "What are you drinking?" not "What's a value pour?":grin:

That said, the Selbach that I referenced is $19.99, and the Lapierre Morgon can be had for $25.99. Neither would break your bank.

Well that's great news. And yes, my question may have been a bit off topic, but I didn't think it warranted a separate thread.

You'll get no argument from me regarding my bourbon snobbery; doesn't mean I can't refer to people whose wine talk goes over my head as snobs! You know how nerd used to be derogatory, but now it's cool? Well, maybe we should take snob in that direction as well...

sutton
05-02-2012, 15:38
Refer me to some sub-$20 bottles of anything. With red I prefer medium to light-bodied, but I like to taste the soil, and prefer a spice to oak in the heavier-bodied ones. With white, I'd love something round and refreshing with muted lemon and slightly creamy butter, but I hate oaky chardonnays.

But yeah, I'd love some affordable suggestions in any style! TIA!

Good wine is everywhere now - generally speaking, values can be found in the lesser known regions.

For reds, sounds like you would like Pinot Noirs and Sangiovese - both are sensitive to where they are grown (in wine geek speak, reflect their terroir), have an earthy note, and are (generally) light to medium bodied.

A good value in Pinot Noir that is usually widely available is A to Z Pinot Noir from Oregon - usually can be found for $15-$18. There are also some good affordable Pinots coming out of New Zealand and Patagonia.

For Sangiovese, a good value and widely available is Viticcio Chianti Classico or Monsanto Chianti Classico Riserva - you can usually find these for $15-$20.

For whites, sounds like you should seek out unoaked Chardonnays - these are prevalent now. The creamy, buttery note you are looking for however is usually the result of a barrel-fermented Chardonnay that is put through malolactic fermentation - so depending on how long they stay in barrel, these wines can also pick up an oak-note. The closest thing I know of that matches the profile you are looking for is Chablis from Burgundy, but entry price here usually starts above $50.

On the value side, something a bit different is Torrontes, found in Argentina - Crios de Susana Balbo is pretty widely available. Pinot Gris (Oregon) or Pinot Grigio (Italy) can all be found for less than $20 - here you'll get the lemon, but not the butter.

Clavius
05-02-2012, 16:17
I love Cabernet Sauvignon. Typically I like them bold with dark fruit and oak and cedar notes. Unfortunately Cabs, especially Napa Cabs, can be pricey. Are there any specific "new world" producers of Cabernet Sauvignon along these lines? Or is the terroir too different from Napa?

dridge11
05-02-2012, 16:36
Napa Cab is always going to be expensive, but I also haven't found any other regions that will give you the same flavor profiles as a good substitute. This is why I tend to focus on regions like Rhone, Loire, Italy, and Bordeaux (which is getting tricky for values). And, honestly, one of the reasons I'm getting into Bourbon.

I've found quite a few Pinots I enjoy around $25, my company also buys/sells wine collections so we get lots of odds/ends from those that usually keep my curiosity occupied.

That said, I got an email today for a bottle of 1970 Chateau Palmer for $280, I'm quite tempted. One of the best wines I've ever had.

Gillman
05-02-2012, 17:02
Wine. I almost never drink it, but I like it. Given an interest in whisky and beer, there is little room for wine, but also one's taste develops on a certain vector that seems different than for any wine. This must be due to the cereal basis of whisky and beer. It's the grape and the malt, do the twain really meet...?

But here's some wine I like. I like Champagne and good sparklers anywhere, like Prosecco, say, or good Napa stuff.

I like Beaujolais: Fleurie, Morgon, and Brouilly, say, or any of it if not too jammy or raw.

I like (good) California Cabernet Sauvignon. Merlot (i.e., where that grape predominates) not so much.

I like Alsace Riesling and Sylvaner.

I like ice wine from Ontario.

I like good Chablis, but little Cal Chard which I find too buttery and appley, or maybe I haven't had the good stuff.

Don't like Sauvignon Blanc, French, N.Z. or any other kind, that strange gooseberry/cat's pee taste puts me off, I never understood that taste. (Some hops taste like that by the way).

And so, I do like wine, but rarely drink it...

Gary

Clavius
05-02-2012, 17:06
Napa Cab is always going to be expensive, but I also haven't found any other regions that will give you the same flavor profiles as a good substitute. This is why I tend to focus on regions like Rhone, Loire, Italy, and Bordeaux (which is getting tricky for values). And, honestly, one of the reasons I'm getting into Bourbon.

I've found quite a few Pinots I enjoy around $25, my company also buys/sells wine collections so we get lots of odds/ends from those that usually keep my curiosity occupied.

That said, I got an email today for a bottle of 1970 Chateau Palmer for $280, I'm quite tempted. One of the best wines I've ever had.
Sounds like a fun job!

My grandfather has a 1970 Lafite that he will probably never open. Who knows if it's even still good!

sutton
05-02-2012, 17:19
I love Cabernet Sauvignon. Typically I like them bold with dark fruit and oak and cedar notes. Unfortunately Cabs, especially Napa Cabs, can be pricey. Are there any specific "new world" producers of Cabernet Sauvignon along these lines? Or is the terroir too different from Napa?

You can still get good values with Chilean or Washington State cabernet - but the best of these are not priced too much differently than Napa these days. Argentinian Malbec can also have that ripe, dark fruit, oak and cedar profile ...

Tico
05-02-2012, 20:48
Wine was my first love and still is. My introduction to the bourbon world a few years ago was a fun one as its so much more affordable than wine. $100 bottles of wine are drained in one sitting while a good bottle of bourbon can last for months.

CA wine is great and it's styles vary widely. I trend towards Cabernet from The Santa Cruz mountains with a few producers from Sonoma and Napa that make wines on the classical side of the spectrum. Classified BDX is ridiculous at this point, backfilling on vintages like 2001, 2004, 2006 and 2008 is a smart thing to do, so much more affordable than ripe trophy vintages. Pinot from Burgundy and the Sonoma coast is my weak spot and makes up over 50% of my cellar.

For true value and world class wines, look to savigny le beaune in Burgundy, cru Beaujolais and German Riesling. I'm convinced that the sweet and dry whites from the Mosel and nahe are some of the best white wines in the world. Plus they are much more affordable than white burg or Cali chard.

For suds, grower champagne is my focus but some of this big house stuff can be great. 02 Bollinger GA is one for the ages, classic stuff. Some of my grower favorites are Chiquet, Gimonnet and Billiot.

For my Sarah fix there are some great values from cool spots in norther Cali. Haven't found any Grenache that seems to work from Ca, for that I go to the Rhone. Still very fair when compared to Burgundy or BDX but getting more expensive. Some of my memorable wine moments always seem to include aged beaucastel or vieux telegraphe.

White Dog
05-03-2012, 09:26
Wine was my first love and still is. My introduction to the bourbon world a few years ago was a fun one as its so much more affordable than wine. $100 bottles of wine are drained in one sitting while a good bottle of bourbon can last for months.

CA wine is great and it's styles vary widely. I trend towards Cabernet from The Santa Cruz mountains with a few producers from Sonoma and Napa that make wines on the classical side of the spectrum. Classified BDX is ridiculous at this point, backfilling on vintages like 2001, 2004, 2006 and 2008 is a smart thing to do, so much more affordable than ripe trophy vintages. Pinot from Burgundy and the Sonoma coast is my weak spot and makes up over 50% of my cellar.

For true value and world class wines, look to savigny le beaune in Burgundy, cru Beaujolais and German Riesling. I'm convinced that the sweet and dry whites from the Mosel and nahe are some of the best white wines in the world. Plus they are much more affordable than white burg or Cali chard.

For suds, grower champagne is my focus but some of this big house stuff can be great. 02 Bollinger GA is one for the ages, classic stuff. Some of my grower favorites are Chiquet, Gimonnet and Billiot.

For my Sarah fix there are some great values from cool spots in norther Cali. Haven't found any Grenache that seems to work from Ca, for that I go to the Rhone. Still very fair when compared to Burgundy or BDX but getting more expensive. Some of my memorable wine moments always seem to include aged beaucastel or vieux telegraphe.

I'd like to echo Tico's comments on German Riesling and grower bubbles! German Riesling is ridiculously cheap, and if American's can get past the sugar bias, they'll find what they're missing. (Unfortunately, Austrian Riesling, which is close to my heart, is not underpriced.)

And yes, Billiot and Gimmonet are true Champagne estates. As are Vilmart and Bara.

When discussing Domestic regions, I tend to recommend producers, rather than region. Outside of Zinfandel, I don't feel that other grapes really show terroir on the west coast. Is mountain grown Napa cab distinct from valley floor, yes, but we could also pour Alexander Valley cabs that would fool you in a blind tasting. And does Pinot Noir from Carneros differ from Russian River, mostly, but producer practices make for lots of variability.

For California, instead of regions I tend to just recommend producers that make wines in a style that speak to my palate. I prefer higher acid, minerally whites, and I prefer reds to have a certain lift, and frankly, to not be picked at 28 brix. Sinskey, Mt. Eden, Folk Machine/Ghostwriter, Navarro, Kathy Corison, Arnot-Roberts, and Smith-Madrone are big favorites.

dridge11
05-04-2012, 14:11
Tico, you should check out The Third Man from Gramercy Cellars. 50 Grenache, 30 Syrah, 20 Mouvedre. Awesome juice. I really liked the Rhone stuff from Walla Walla when I was there last month. Bordeaux varietals not so much.

Tico
05-10-2012, 13:03
Polished off a bottle of 2002 gaston chiquet special club. Porbably my favorite special club of 2002 right behind the gimonnet. Really special stuff, chalk full of racy acid and minerals.

Speaking of this, Woodland Hills Wine co is throwing a killer sale on this and some others champers for mothers day, great prices on the chiquet and vilmart.

http://www.whwc.com/is-bin/INTERSHOP.enfinity/WFS/WHWC-WHWC-Site/en_US/-/USD/ViewSearch-CategorySearch?CategoryName=root-WhatsNew-WhatsNew37

White Dog
05-10-2012, 13:28
:bigeyes: :bigeyes: :bigeyes: They're basically giving away Vilmart.

Tico
05-10-2012, 17:20
:bigeyes: :bigeyes: :bigeyes: They're basically giving away Vilmart.
I agree, they gave away a half case to me :cool:

Clavius
05-13-2012, 17:24
Drinking 2008 Barons de Rothschild (Lafite) Cabernet Sauvignon Los Vascos Reserve. Just opened it up and in my limited wine vocabulary I would describe it as "green" with some tartness. Going to let it sit for awhile and see how it changes...

Tico
05-13-2012, 17:37
Drinking 2008 Barons de Rothschild (Lafite) Cabernet Sauvignon Los Vascos Reserve. Just opened it up and in my limited wine vocabulary I would describe it as "green" with some tartness. Going to let it sit for awhile and see how it changes...

Not a fan of green wines. Some Chinon drinkers call it complexity, I call it under ripe!

Clavius
05-13-2012, 17:52
Not a fan of green wines. Some Chinon drinkers call it complexity, I call it under ripe!
It has opened up a bit and become more integrated (?) and more mellow. I like it now.

bllygthrd
05-13-2012, 18:06
2008 Vina Decana Tempranillo - [Spain/Utiel-Requena]

Clavius
05-15-2012, 19:50
2008 Man O' War Merlot Cab-Franc Malbec blend from Waiheke Island New Zealand. I really like this wine!

Clavius
05-17-2012, 16:27
Tonight it's the 2010 Man O' War Sauvignon Blanc from Waiheke Island in New Zealand. And once again, I really like this wine/winery! Just a very refreshing SB with lots of lime and citrus notes.

dridge11
05-17-2012, 18:29
Today, I had:

NV Krug
06 Bond Melbury
06 Bond Vecina
06 Bond Quella
06 Bond St Eden
06 Bond Pluribus
09 Promontory Cab
10 Promontory Cab
09 Dagueneau Blanc Fume de Pouilly
03 Ch Leoville Poyferre
10 Darioush Sauv Blanc
05 Darioush Cab
06 Darioush Cab
08 Darioush Cab
06 Darius II Cab

Clavius
05-17-2012, 18:41
Man O' War SB bit the dust. Now drinking 2005 Waterstone Napa Cab. Pretty smooth!

Tico
05-17-2012, 20:02
All I saw on that list was krug, dagueneau and LP :cool:

sutton
05-18-2012, 03:23
06 Bond Melbury
06 Bond Vecina
06 Bond Quella
06 Bond St Eden
06 Bond Pluribus


Wow. That is some nice, decadent, pours ... even before you get to the rest of your list!

White Dog
05-18-2012, 09:23
Today, I had:

NV Krug
06 Bond Melbury
06 Bond Vecina
06 Bond Quella
06 Bond St Eden
06 Bond Pluribus
09 Promontory Cab
10 Promontory Cab
09 Dagueneau Blanc Fume de Pouilly
03 Ch Leoville Poyferre
10 Darioush Sauv Blanc
05 Darioush Cab
06 Darioush Cab
08 Darioush Cab
06 Darius II Cab

What did you think of the Bonds? They've always disappointed me.

Tico
05-21-2012, 14:58
2006 Rivers Marie Occidental Ridge PN last night on the patio with filet mignon, pan fried corn and fresh artichokes from the garden.

The RM was drinking very nice. Big and rich but with some air it softened. Drinking great and went well with dinner. Perfect balance of ripe fruit, earth and acidity.

clingman71
05-21-2012, 15:25
Southbound, will be in Macon tomorrow. Stopped at Country Boy Brewing in Lexington for a stretch of the legs and a pint of Fulcan-A IPA. Georgia here we come!

clingman71
05-21-2012, 19:06
Sorry, I fat-fingered my phone trying to select beer thread, can't seem to delete post from phone.

dridge11
05-23-2012, 11:03
What did you think of the Bonds? They've always disappointed me.

These were pretty solid. I've not had a ton, tried a few 01/02 St Eden and Vecina before and really liked those. Their new project, Promontory, is going to be a nice one.

Tico
05-26-2012, 14:35
Dinner at the in laws again. Polished off a bottle of 09 Lapierre Morgon and a bottle of 85 Beringer Private Reserve Cab. The Lapierre was grumpy at first but woke up with about an hour of air. Still too big for my tastes, I will give it more time in the cellar. The Beringer was singing, fantastic bottle, at peak and drinking beautifully.

Then we dipped into some bourbon, still a bit fuzzy after last night.

Clavius
05-26-2012, 18:31
Any of you guys ever had Chateau de Pez red Bordeaux? I have a copy of The Wine Bible by Karen MacNeil and she recommended it as a good, cheaper red Bordeaux. I found the 2007 vintage at a store here and it runs about $55...

Tico
05-27-2012, 09:25
Any of you guys ever had Chateau de Pez red Bordeaux? I have a copy of The Wine Bible by Karen MacNeil and she recommended it as a good, cheaper red Bordeaux. I found the 2007 vintage at a store here and it runs about $55...

Ormes de pez or straight de pez?

sutton
05-27-2012, 16:47
Any of you guys ever had Chateau de Pez red Bordeaux? I have a copy of The Wine Bible by Karen MacNeil and she recommended it as a good, cheaper red Bordeaux. I found the 2007 vintage at a store here and it runs about $55...

It is serviceable in a good vintage, usually don't venture too far off the beaten path in off-vintages unless I've had a sample ...

Clavius
05-27-2012, 19:01
Ormes de pez or straight de pez?
Just straight de Pez.

Clavius
05-27-2012, 19:02
It is serviceable in a good vintage, usually don't venture too far off the beaten path in off-vintages unless I've had a sample ...
Was '07 a good vintage for Bordeaux in general?

Tico
05-28-2012, 10:33
Was '07 a good vintage for Bordeaux in general?

Probably one of the weakest of the past decade next to 2002.

Clavius
05-28-2012, 13:22
Well crap. I knew 2005 was a great year.

cigarnv
05-28-2012, 15:23
2008 Cono Sur Reserve pinot noir... fabulous value for a pinot...

Tico
05-29-2012, 20:39
1988 Silver Oak Napa Cab and 1988 Vichon Napa Cab with burgers last night. The Vichon seemed to be in better shape than the SO but both were enjoyable.

cigarnv
05-30-2012, 04:37
1988 Silver Oak Napa Cab and 1988 Vichon Napa Cab with burgers last night. The Vichon seemed to be in better shape than the SO but both were enjoyable.

The SO, IMO, never aged as gracefully as many other Ca. cabs. The 1988 Alex. was one of my least favorites given it had some out of character vegatative overtones. Typically the Napa was the better of the two for aging. Just had an 96 Napa that was good..

Tico
05-30-2012, 18:43
The SO, IMO, never aged as gracefully as many other Ca. cabs. The 1988 Alex. was one of my least favorites given it had some out of character vegatative overtones. Typically the Napa was the better of the two for aging. Just had an 96 Napa that was good..

Yeah, this SO was a drink five years ago. The 88 and 89 SO, both AV and Napa were lighter due to the vintage. The Mid 80's stuff 84-87 were all solid, even the AV.

Tico
05-31-2012, 22:03
Dinner at the in laws again. Tonight we did a 1994 Williams Selyem RRV Pinot and a bottle of 1995 Williams Selyem Olivet Lane Pinot.

Both were still super fresh, the Olivet is drinking great with no signs of fading.

sutton
06-02-2012, 04:22
Probably one of the weakest of the past decade next to 2002.

Sorry for the delay in reply Clavius, have been traveling and just catching up now. Tico is right, 2007 was comparable generally to 2002 quality. Of recent stuff you might still find in stores, 2005, and 2008 thru 2010 (as they become available) should all be pretty good values in the non-classified growths.

Generally you can find this type of vintage information on the web. Here is one that is pretty complete and detailed - just like bourbon, other reviewers will have different views, but as a general guide it is helpful:

http://www.erobertparker.com/info/vintagechart.pdf

sutton
06-02-2012, 04:26
Dinner at the in laws again. Tonight we did a 1994 Williams Selyem RRV Pinot and a bottle of 1995 Williams Selyem Olivet Lane Pinot.

Both were still super fresh, the Olivet is drinking great with no signs of fading.


William Selyem is great stuff! Not surprised they are holding up - a treat to have them with some bottle age ...

Gillman
06-05-2012, 17:51
I don't drink wine very much, a bit when I'm out at a nice dinner. When I got home though I opened a Chablis. I find it a little oaky for me, a little "hot" from the wood although otherwise rounded and pleasant with good mineral notes and a sort of apple-like background. It reminds me of some Chards from CA but not as buttery which I think is because American oak is different to what they use in France. No warm vanillin-butter in this one, you guys know what I mean.

I'm not a "wine drinker" though, I like beer and whiskey much more.

Gary

sutton
06-06-2012, 05:16
I don't drink wine very much, a bit when I'm out at a nice dinner. When I got home though I opened a Chablis. I find it a little oaky for me, a little "hot" from the wood although otherwise rounded and pleasant with good mineral notes and a sort of apple-like background. It reminds me of some Chards from CA but not as buttery which I think is because American oak is different to what they use in France. No warm vanillin-butter in this one, you guys know what I mean.

I'm not a "wine drinker" though, I like beer and whiskey much more.

Gary

Gary, what Chablis were you drinking? Traditionally, they are fermented and aged in stainless steel ... although some may do barrel fermentation and barrel aging, that is more typical of chardonnay from other Burgundy regions. Your tasting notes are spot on - usually Chablis does not go through malolactic fermentation, preserving that bright acidity, mineral, apple/lemon note and avoiding the buttery tone.

The 'oaky' note is surprising but not unheard of - some Chablis producers might be experimenting with barrel fermentation/aging.

rutterb
06-06-2012, 05:56
Torrentes (sp) and whites from Chile. Having traveled there and Argentina this past spring, it's been our main wines of the moment.

bigtoys
06-06-2012, 20:15
Shatter Grenache by winemakers Dave Phinney (of Orin Swift) and Joel Gott
from Maury, a small town in the Roussillon region of France
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0835.jpg

link:
http://www.shatterwine.com/wine/index.htm

AaronWF
06-07-2012, 09:32
I had a really tasty wine last night that I was referred to by asking for something similar to Lapierre Morgan (since Binny's is out of that stuff). But my wife threw out the bottle before I could write it down, and for the life of me I cannot remember what the heck it was. This is my problem with wine. I know what the label looks like, and I intend to seek it out again because it was of great quality for being in the $15 range.

Moulin a Vents? Something Marie Chefferente? What is it about wine names that I just can't keep in my head?

T Comp
06-07-2012, 10:35
I had a really tasty wine last night that I was referred to by asking for something similar to Lapierre Morgan (since Binny's is out of that stuff). But my wife threw out the bottle before I could write it down, and for the life of me I cannot remember what the heck it was. This is my problem with wine. I know what the label looks like, and I intend to seek it out again because it was of great quality for being in the $15 range.

Moulin a Vents? Something Marie Chefferente? What is it about wine names that I just can't keep in my head?

Moulin-a-Vent a Cru Beaujolais from the gamey grape which is often quite tasty and in some years subs well as a poor mans Burgundy. It can be quite tasty and my favorite of the Cru's. Aged in oak and takes to some long term ageing. I'm thinking the producer was Pierre-Marie Chermette.

AaronWF
06-07-2012, 10:45
Moulin-a-Vent a Cru Beaujolais from the gamey grape which is often quite tasty and in some years subs well as a poor mans Burgundy. It can be quite tasty and my favorite of the Cru's. Aged in oak and takes to some long term ageing. I'm thinking the producer was Pierre-Marie Chermette.

Yup, you nailed it, thanks Thad. I guess the oak does a lot to give it that silky texture I enjoyed. I've been drinking a lot of Tempranillo, and I like the change in texture to this stuff.

T Comp
06-07-2012, 21:44
Moulin-a-Vent a Cru Beaujolais from the gamey grape which is often quite tasty and in some years subs well as a poor mans Burgundy. It can be quite tasty and my favorite of the Cru's. Aged in oak and takes to some long term ageing. I'm thinking the producer was Pierre-Marie Chermette.

And I know it's the Gamay grape not the gamey grape though I have had a few of the latter too :grin:. And how about, it is often quite tasty versus it can be quite tasty :rolleyes:. Note to self...don't post from your iphone while in your car in the bright sunshine even if your parked.

cigarnv
06-12-2012, 03:29
Opened a 1986 Groth Cab that held up very well. Great fruit, moth feel and as one would suspect no tannin. Sadly the age did not do anything for the "green pepper' nuances the Groth and other Oakville Crossroad vineyards seem to have at times.....

Gillman
06-12-2012, 11:27
I don't have a lot of experience with it, but Morgon (of the Beaujolais Crus Thad mentioned) always seems the most burgundy-like to me.

Sampled recently an Oregon Pinot Blanc, quite good but there was a touch of appley flavor I didn't like. But otherwise good and quite complex flavors for a reasonable price.

Gary

CorvallisCracker
06-12-2012, 12:19
I don't have a lot of experience with it, but Morgon (of the Beaujolais Crus Thad mentioned) always seems the most burgundy-like to me.

A favorite of my wife's.



Sampled recently an Oregon Pinot Blanc, quite good but there was a touch of appley flavor I didn't like. But otherwise good and quite complex flavors for a reasonable price.

Really? Which one?

Tico
06-12-2012, 15:40
Opened a 1986 Groth Cab that held up very well. Great fruit, moth feel and as one would suspect no tannin. Sadly the age did not do anything for the "green pepper' nuances the Groth and other Oakville Crossroad vineyards seem to have at times.....

Silver Oak Bonny's is right around the corner from there and no matter the year I always got a little bit of green from these wines of the 80's.

dridge11
06-14-2012, 10:23
Tonight we're doing 2010 Pelle Menetou Salon Clos Blanchais (favorite house white) and 1996 Bruno Giacosa Barbaresco. I'm sure we'll get into a few other things as well.

Jono
06-16-2012, 10:46
Finished a rather pleasing bottle of Gnarly Head Authentic Red

http://cheapwineratings.com/2012/01/30/gnarly-head-authentic-red/

Not expensive, picked it up at the grocery store, similar to Apothic Red.
Nice blend of various CA varietals that come together for an appealing
wine that won't break the bank. The attached review is pretty spot on from my tasting.

Gillman
06-16-2012, 15:23
Boutari from Greece, one of their whites. Excellent and finely balanced.

Gary

sutton
06-16-2012, 16:48
Celebrated an early Father's Day with a 2002 Staglin 20th Anniversary Cab ... was an excellent pairing with the bone-in ribeye. Tannin is largely resolved, but still dense fruit with balancing acidity. A fantastic bottle.

Clavius
06-18-2012, 17:19
I'm at work drinking some 2009 Inkblot. It's a Cabernet Franc from Lodi by Michael-David and it is amazing. If I had the money to blow I would certainly bunker a case of it. Great stuff!

petrel800
06-21-2012, 18:44
2004 Crianza de Restia Ribera del Duero - A very nice red for the price. 2011 Top 100. Went well with the bacon wrap tenderloins and cheddar white grits. It is somewhat fruit forward, but finishes of tobacco and wood. I think I'm going to go back and buy the rest of them.

bigtoys
07-02-2012, 19:02
opened a rather old 2006 Shafer Red Shoulder Ranch (Carneros) Chardonnay and it was quite good. Even my wife liked it. No butter (malolactic). Crisp, grassy, lemons; my favorite taste of California Chardonnay. lots of 89 to low 90's on cellar tracker.

petrel800
07-02-2012, 20:07
Got engaged Saturday, opened a bottle of 2003 Vilmart & Cie Champagne Grand Cellier d'Or 1er Cru to enjoy right after she said yes. We knocked the bottle out while she was making phone calls. Went to dinner that night at the Capital Grille and opened one of our 2006 Chateau Teyssier Le Carre St. Emillion Grand Cru. Both were great, with the highlight being the Le Carre. What a blend of Merlot and Franc. Well balanced, black fruits and a great finish of Oak. Great wines for a great evening.

Tico
07-06-2012, 21:21
Polished off a bottle of 10' Copain Tous Ensemble Chard. It would be hard to find a better CA chard for $20, IMO. 50% malo with zero new oak, super fresh and vibrant.

Jono
07-10-2012, 08:12
http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2012/07/05/top-10-wines-under-10/?intcmp=features

Top 10 wines under $10

Published July 10, 2012

Gayo

I tend to drink value wines...say $20 and under...usually 15 and under.
Can anyone pair a recommended mid priced wine...>20 and with a recommended value counterpart to demonstate
what the extra $cost brings to the glass?

I think volume drives price and if the volume is excellent quality, it may be just as good as the pricier bottle. Thoughts?
For example, most shelves are over flowing with Australian, South American and California wines. Some are better than
others but many of these value priced wines stand up very well in comparison to more expensive.

White Dog
07-13-2012, 19:58
http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2012/07/05/top-10-wines-under-10/?intcmp=features

Top 10 wines under $10

Published July 10, 2012

Gayo

I tend to drink value wines...say $20 and under...usually 15 and under.
Can anyone pair a recommended mid priced wine...>20 and with a recommended value counterpart to demonstate
what the extra $cost brings to the glass?

I think volume drives price and if the volume is excellent quality, it may be just as good as the pricier bottle. Thoughts?
For example, most shelves are over flowing with Australian, South American and California wines. Some are better than
others but many of these value priced wines stand up very well in comparison to more expensive.

Jono, I could go on and on in response to your post, but I'll try to keep it brief.

I don't know your palate, nor your grape preferences, but here's what I'll say.

If you like Sauvignon Blanc, the Chileans are doing it as well as anyone these days, and for half of what you're gonna pay from most other countries.

If you insist on drinking Pinot Noir under $20, California will outperform Oregon for the dollar, and Chile also has many up and comers in this price point.

Cab/Merlot or Chard? Eh. The whole world is churning out look-alike/taste-alike wines. I'm too jaded to care anymore.

But do you want real value, outside of categories that Americans cling to?

Then drink German Riesling, as the acidity from good producers like Selbach will soar above cheaper American versions. Or drink Austrian Gruner, as there are more good versions under $20 than there are bad versions. For both of these categories stick with the importer Terry Theise and you can't go wrong.

Sicily is undervalued, and producers like LiVeli are punching above their weight, with most skus under $20. LiVeli has become the OGD of Italy, IMHO.

Also, look to the reds and whites of the Roussillon region of France, near the Spanish boader. Not Languedoc, mind you, which can be more sporadic but Roussillon. Fantastic versions using mostly Rhone varieties that are sold for a song.

And I'll always love Muscadet, but I love seafood, so why not?

OscarV
07-14-2012, 11:44
A gift from Amy, 2006 Papa Luna Calatayud.
Having some with guacamole and Mexican chips while getting the grill heated up for steaks.
This wine will go very good with the Porterhouses.
Here's what I found about it,...

The 2006 Papa Luna is aged for five months in French and American oak. It will evolve for two to three years and can be enjoyed now as well as over the next six to eight years. Expect a hedonistic flavor pop from this Papa Luna wine made from four varietals known for yielding wines with punch, spice and character. It is produced in the Calatayud region located northeast of Madrid in the Zaragoza province which is known for its arid, moon-like terrain. Perhaps the origin of the name "Papa Luna" (Father Moon).
Calatayud sits in the lowlands of Aragon, nestled between the eastern reaches of the Guadarrama range and the northern tip of the Cuenca foothills. Dominated by successful co-operative growers with considerable export power, this area is responsible for many of the highly drinkable Spanish table reds available in the US, crafted from grapes both native and international in origin. It received DO status in 1990.

Clavius
07-14-2012, 18:46
Just cracked open a 2008 Duckhorn "Decoy" Cabernet Sauvignon.

Not bad. Not great. But it'll work.

bigtoys
08-13-2012, 21:08
Seavey Caravina Cabernet (from Napa)

qman22
09-18-2012, 12:35
I was in the mood for wine last night, so I popped open a 2004 Chateau Nenin Pomerol. It was really a pretty average right bank Bordeaux... oaky, not a lot of fruit, but not too tannic either. I'm going to finish the rest of the bottle with dinner tonight, so hopefully it will be good on day 2.

sutton
09-18-2012, 15:16
I was in the mood for wine last night, so I popped open a 2004 Chateau Nenin Pomerol. It was really a pretty average right bank Bordeaux... oaky, not a lot of fruit, but not too tannic either. I'm going to finish the rest of the bottle with dinner tonight, so hopefully it will be good on day 2.

I've found your description (not much fruit, light tannin) to be my experience with Bordeaux 2004 - I'm sitting on a few to see how they are at 10 years. Seems like in retrospect these should have been early drinkers; however they could just be in a dumb phase but I don't hold out much hope ...

sutton
09-18-2012, 15:21
2008 Craggy Range Pinot Noir Te Muna Road Vineyard - a very nice New Zealand Pinot showing violet/floral nose, dense black cherry and earth/mushroom notes from the mid-palate through to the finish. Paired nicely with a soy-marinated grilled salmon.

NZ Pinot can be a great QPR, but prices have come up some and they have been crowded out a bit in the US market - harder to find than it was just a few years ago.