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Gillman
04-12-2012, 05:37
As part of my ongoing whiskey vatting experiments, for some years I've been combining the different bottlings of Jack Daniels. IMO, JD in general has improved a lot in recent years. But the regular Jack Black is now 80 proof and sometimes its distinctive top-note of yellow fruit-like flavor (banana, yes but it is more than that) is a little strong for me, so I blend in some JD Single Barrel which is richer and often has none of that top-note or a different one, cherry, say. Gentleman Jack is good to impart overall sweetness and body, it seems to knit everything together.

I have a vatting I plan to add Jack Green Label to, when I get some in KY at the end of the month. This has a younger-tasting profile and in a good mingling I like some whiskey that is less woody than the others, it adds complexity and balance. I'll bring some of my current vatting to the Gazebo upcoming.

Gary

Bmac
04-13-2012, 14:21
As part of my ongoing whiskey vatting experiments, for some years I've been combining the different bottlings of Jack Daniels. IMO, JD in general has improved a lot in recent years. But the regular Jack Black is now 80 proof and sometimes its distinctive top-note of yellow fruit-like flavor (banana, yes but it is more than that) is a little strong for me, so I blend in some JD Single Barrel which is richer and often has none of that top-note or a different one, cherry, say. Gentleman Jack is good to impart overall sweetness and body, it seems to knit everything together.

I have a vatting I plan to add Jack Green Label to, when I get some in KY at the end of the month. This has a younger-tasting profile and in a good mingling I like some whiskey that is less woody than the others, it adds complexity and balance. I'll bring some of my current vatting to the Gazebo upcoming.

Gary
What about throwing in a little bit of George Dickel no12 or Barrel Select? Similar family of products and it might bring some stronger spicy notes into that JD VAT?

Gillman
04-13-2012, 16:03
Indeed! I call that the Tennessee Waltz.

Gary

WhiskyToWhiskey
04-14-2012, 18:25
Indeed! I call that the Tennessee Waltz.

Gary

lol...that name has already been taken;

Tennessee Waltz Drink Recipe

Recipe Ingredients

2 oz. Pineapple Juice
4 oz. Vanilla Ice Cream
1 1/4 oz. Peach Schnapps
1 oz. Passion Fruit Juice
Instruction

blend ingredients until smooth, parfait glass and garnish with whipped cream and a strawberry

But....I think I might prefer your version....

Gillman
04-14-2012, 20:26
I agree, that one's not for me either. :)

How about the Tennessee Twain?

Gary

mrviognier
04-19-2012, 15:39
How 'bout "A Volunteered State"?

Gillman
11-07-2012, 15:58
I came up with a good vatting recently. I used two single barrels and two Jack Black Labels. I tinkered until I got the right balance. In particular, two of the brands were excessively woody, while the others were medicinal/minty or kind of chestnut-earthy. In the right combination, it is a silky dram that melts away on the palate and leaves a blending of each flavor. The proof is about 90, maybe a little less. I can't improve on it, not from the materials I used anyway.

Gary

Jono
12-05-2012, 16:30
Highwest Campfire is, according to Jason Pyle - http://sourmashmanifesto.com/category/reviewsratings/high-west-reviewsratings/

"Here’s the gist of Campfire Whiskey. Its a blend of a six year old bourbon distilled and aged at Midwest Grain Products (Formerly Lawrenceburg Distillers Indiana or LDI), a 5.5 year old rye whiskey also distilled at the former LDI and aged in the upper floors of the famed Stitzel Weller Warehouses in Kentucky, and finally an 8 year old peated Scotch whiskey from the Scottish mainland. Global blending anyone???"

Any suggestions on trying to mimick this vatting?

Maybe 5-10% Highland Park 8 Year Old Single Malt Scotch Whisky or similar....Isle Of Skye 8 year old .
Maybe 40%-60% Bulleit.....or 4 Roses? VOB?

Gillman
12-05-2012, 17:02
Sure, but I'd use a peatier malt. Say 40% VOB or 4R or JDSB, 40% Russell's Reserve Rye or Bulleit Rye or Baby Saz, the rest Laphroig or any good Islay malt but not too old.

Which worthy SBer will do this right now and report of himself well and truly? :) Easy to do in the glass...

Gary

Jono
12-05-2012, 17:08
I would do it but I don't have the HW Campfire for comparison purposes....but may play around anyhow.

Gillman
12-05-2012, 17:09
Yes, you don't need that other, it just gives the general idea.

Gary

Gillman
12-05-2012, 17:13
Another plan but following Jono's general approach: substitute a smoky, woody bourbon for the peated malt. EC 18 or 20, say, or one of the very aged Van Winkle line.

Do both, the Campfire-inspired and then the all-American one: which is better?

Gary

Jono
12-05-2012, 21:56
I am not great at identifying multiple taste elements but here goes my rough attempt...

1st attempt...4RSB 60%, Talisker 10% and Old Overholt 30%....eyeballed the proportions. I let it sit a bit to let the Talisker play nice with the bourbon and rye.
The nose, after sitting, retains some initial peat but less than upon first pour. The sweet elements - corn and honey rise up with just a trace of spice.
Taste...peat is present that wraps around the sweeter bourbon and very light spice. Finish is peaty with some leather and wood.

I have to get the Highwest Campfire to compare. I suspect the Talisker may be too much, a lighter peat touch may be the way to go. Also, a spicier rye may help.

2nd attempt - I added some Rittenhouse to the original vat...so the rough ratios are 4rsb 45%, Talisker 5% and rye..Old O / Ritt 100 45%

Nose, hint of peat, more spice and retains the corn and honey sweetness.
Taste...actualy, very nice, smooth, initially a unique blend of sweet and spicy peat and then peat is present on the finish with leather and wood notes.

I would say, don't go strong on the peated scotch, maybe use an eye dropper and titrate the bourbon and rye vatting carefully.

HighInTheMtns
12-05-2012, 22:02
I've tried before; I can't remember the bourbon or rye, but the scotch was HP12. I didn't consider the vatting a success and my biggest problem was that it wasn't peated enough for my taste. I could do with Campfire being more peated as well.

I'll try again, and I'm thinking that I might go high end - a barrel strength FR, THH, and Ardbeg Corryvreckan - it's only a splash of each, after all. There seems to be a bit of romance in blending whiskeys at cask strength.

Jono
12-06-2012, 06:28
Since the peat can quickly overwhelm the vatting, and it sounds like the Campfire has just a hint, so creating a mimick will take quite a few side by side comparisons.

Gillman
12-06-2012, 06:51
Good experiments, No. 2 sounds great.

What I've found is, when a proportion isn't right, sometimes reducing it helps, but also sometimes too, adding more.

Gary

WhiskyToWhiskey
04-11-2013, 19:48
Today I had an idea for the 2 JDSB I sampled head to head in another thread. One delicate and nice, the other bold, flavourful, and in your face. I decided to make a mingling of the two. My 1st attempt was 2 parts #12-6714 (delicate) with 1 part 12-6500 (bold). The bold JDSB flavour was too dominant. Then I tried 4 parts delicate and 1 part bold. They seemed to come together rather well at this ratio.

Gillman
04-12-2013, 04:42
This sounds very good, different proportions can make a big difference in the result.

Gary

Gillman
11-28-2013, 15:46
Killer vatting here, 1/3rd each Jack Black, Jack Master Distiller Series 86 proof, and Silver Select. Silky soft but big rich flavours of American straight whiskey (creosote, copper, char), each contributes qualities to make this a luxury dram. I read William Faulkner saved Jack Daniels for special occasions so I raise this glass to him, a tribute not so distant in geography; he trained in Toronto with the British Air Force for half a year but the war ended before he could be sent overseas. I guess he made do with Canadian whisky when up here, but he'd have liked this vat of Jack, of that I have no doubt. Hemingway also lived here, about a stone's throw from where I type, in fact, another story…

Gary

WhiskyToWhiskey
03-29-2014, 20:36
My go to whiskey has been JDSB. Tonight I had JD Master Distiller Series #1 86proof, and I am thinking it needs something to balance it. It seems it has lots of extra spice, and wood-char...it can definately be made better. Have 3 JDSB bottles in cabinet and some JD Black. Not sure I want to try 3 x 1/3 each like Gary did because I like the SB too much. I'm thinking the sweet mellow Gentleman Jack will kick down the spice and wood-char a notch, and add more sweetness (It might taste closer to the White Rabbit Saloon after mixing). Maybe instead of 1/3 JD Silver Select I will add 1/3 Gentleman Jack.......