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View Full Version : What cocktail are you enjoying Spring/Summer 2012?



sob0728
04-22-2012, 19:23
4RSB old fashioned. Damn good after a long weekend writing a paper for a grad school class.

Trey Manthey
04-24-2012, 10:40
Old Fashioned :
Sugar cube, heavy on water & bitters, swab inside of glass with orange peel instead of muddling. Rittenhouse rye BIB or Bulleit bourbon

Sazerac:
My perfected recipe, using Baby Saz of course.

"Just Like Honey":
Bulleit or 4Roses 1B, Sloe gin, Roses Lemon, Club Soda, and a diluted honey. Garnish with lemon peel.

Also, it's starting up into the hot weather in NOLA, so I've been making some Pimm's Cups and Negronis.

Tony
04-24-2012, 10:46
Old Fashioned :
Sugar cube, heavy on water & bitters, swab inside of glass with orange peel instead of muddling. Rittenhouse rye BIB or Bulleit bourbon

Sazerac:
My perfected recipe, using Baby Saz of course.

"Just Like Honey":
Bulleit or 4Roses 1B, Sloe gin, Roses Lemon, Club Soda, and a diluted honey. Garnish with lemon peel.

Also, it's starting up into the hot weather in NOLA, so I've been making some Pimm's Cups and Negronis.

Good Day Trey-

CAn you share your Sazerac recipe? Always looking for others.

Best regards, Tony

Trey Manthey
04-24-2012, 14:21
My Sazerac:

I usually see Sazeracs served in Old Fashioned glasses, but I like to use something smaller, like this:

http://nolafoodie.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/sazerac-web-nolafoodie.jpg

Chill your glass with ice and water while mixing. In a separate glass/mixer, muddle a sugar cube with a splash of water, three dashes of Peychaud's, and a few drops of Angostura. Add 1.5 oz of Baby Saz, and stir/muddle until sugar is completely dissolved. Gently stir two cubes of ice in. Then, empty the ice from your chilled glass, and put a splash of Herbsaint or absinthe and swirl it around to coat, then discard (or drink :cool:) the excess. Strain the mix into the chilled glass. Peel a two inch strip of fresh lemon over the glass, then rub the inside of the peel around the edge of the glass. Then I twist the peel over the glass and drop it in.

Enjoy!

sob0728
04-24-2012, 19:48
Russell's Reserve bourbon with an ice cube, a splash of water, and a twist of lemon.

yountvillewjs
04-26-2012, 08:49
Everytime I watch this, I want to immediate book a flight to NOLA and go here.

The Old Fashioned

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oEr7ym4-r5I

DaveOfAtl
04-26-2012, 09:29
It's Mint Julep season, and I have been honing my recipe in anticipation of my first ever Derby trip next week.

I love the fact that this drink has been so romanticized. The passage by Joshua Soule Smith comes to mind, which Chris McMillan eloquently recites when making his julep down in NOLA. I'm also a huge fan of this letter from Lieutenant General Simon Bolivar Bucknerís to Major General William D. Connor on the making of the Mint Julep.


My Dear General Connor:
Your letter requesting my formula for mixing mint juleps leaves me in the same position in which Captain Barber found himself when asked how he was able to carve the image of an elephant from a block of wood. He said that it was a simple process consisting merely of whittling off the part that didnít look like an elephant.
The preparation of the quintessence of gentlemanly beverages can be described only in like terms. A mint julep is not a product of a formula. It is a ceremony and must be performed by a gentleman possessing a true sense of the artistic, a deep reverence for the ingredients and a proper appreciation of the occasion. It is a rite that must not be entrusted to a novice, a statistician nor a Yankee. It is a heritage of the Old South, and emblem of hospitality, and a vehicle in which noble minds can travel together upon the flower-strewn paths of a happy and congenial thought.
So far as the mere mechanics of the operation are concerned, the procedure, stripped of its ceremonial embellishments, can be described as follows:
Go to a spring where cool, crystal-clear water bubbles from under a bank of dew-washed ferns. In a consecrated vessel, dip up a little water at the source. Follow the stream thru its banks of green moss and wild flowers until it broadens and trickles thru beds of mint growing in aromatic profusion and waving softly in the summer breeze. Gather the sweetest and tenderest shoots and gently carry them home. Go to the sideboard and select a decanter of Kentucky Bourbon distilled by a master hand, mellowed with age, yet still vigorous and inspiring. An ancestral sugar bowl, a row of silver goblets, some spoons and some ice and you are ready to start.
Into a canvas bag pound twice as much ice as you think you will need. Make it fine as snow, keep it dry and do not allow it to degenerate into slush. Into each goblet, put a slightly heaping teaspoonful of granulated sugar, barely cover this with spring water and slightly bruise one mint leaf into this, leaving the spoon in the goblet. Then pour elixir from the decanter until the goblets are about one-fourth full. Fill the goblets with snowy ice, sprinkling in a small amount of sugar as you fill. Wipe the outside of the goblets dry, and embellish copiously with mint.
Then comes the delicate and important operation of frosting. By proper manipulation of the spoon, the ingredients are circulated and blended until nature, wishing to take a further hand and add another of its beautiful phenomena, encrusts the whole in a glistening coat of white frost.
Thus harmoniously blended by the deft touches of a skilled hand, you have a beverage eminently appropriate for honorable men and beautiful women.
When all is ready, assemble your guests on the porch or in the garden where the aroma of the juleps will rise heavenward and make the birds sing. Propose a worthy toast, raise the goblets to your lips, bury your nose in the mint, inhale a deep breath of its fragrance and sip the nectar of the gods.
Being overcome with thirst, I can write no further.
Sincerely,
Lt. Gen. S.B. Buckner, Jr.
VMI Class of 1906

Tico
04-26-2012, 09:34
Hendrick's Gin and Q tonic water, garnish with a fresh lime. My favorite summertime cocktail.

BFerguson
04-26-2012, 16:09
Death's Door Mojito's.

Their white whiskey makes a decent mojito in my opinion. Not much to sip by itself, but pleasant in the mix.

Plus the name just sounds cool.

B

ratcheer
04-27-2012, 06:37
This is not a cocktail, but I went on a diet after Easter, so I can no longer have sugar. I believe this would be a type of a rickey. I am having a stiff shot of gin (currently using Tanqueray) in a tall glass with a squeeze of lime and lots of ice cubes and water.

"Necessity is the mother of invention". It is quite nice, but it would be better with a little sugar.

BTW, I've been on the diet for 2 1/2 weeks and lost 11 pounds, so far.

Tim

Tony
04-27-2012, 16:14
Thanks Trey will try this weekend.

Today had -
3 ounces of OWA
1.5 ounces of Campari
1.5 ounces of sweet Vermouth

Next time will bump the vermouth up to 2 ounces and the Campari down to one.

Best regards, Tony

camduncan
04-28-2012, 03:05
Made a Lynchburg Lemonade tonight. Didn't have any Jack Daniels, so substituted Makers Mark.:skep:

Clavius
04-28-2012, 18:29
A good ol' Bloody Mary tonight using Zing Zang mix, Russian Standard Vodka and a couple dashes of Tabasco. MmmmMmmm!

BFerguson
04-29-2012, 05:40
Bottle of Deaths Door ran out, so switched to some JM Rhum Agricole Blanc for the days festivities.

This is a pretty excellent white rum! I think it will be the new go to White standard in the house.

The grandma's of the family seemed to be pretty pleased with the results. Keep them happy, everybody is happy. :grin:

B

Kalessin
05-03-2012, 09:34
It seems I like my manhattans sweet at the moment:

1.75 oz WTRye101
.75 oz Cocchi Vermouth de Turin (it has some taste of bitters in it)
half teaspoon dark maple syrup ("grade B" is the dark and strong flavored stuff)
dash of Fee's Orange Bitters
3 Luxardo cherries garnish

Spicy rye, sweet syrup, good vermouth flavoring, I love the orange bitters.

smokinjoe
05-03-2012, 12:13
On a lazy day hanging around the GN last Saturday, catching up with good friends, I threw together a couple of Mint Juleps. It was a great day.

cas
05-03-2012, 14:50
I've been experimenting with the Sazerac for a couple years now, and it has become my favorite. I've cut back on the sugar content of the sugar water to a 1:1 dilution, and often chill the rye first so the drink is cool but not ice cold.
Craig

Gillman
05-03-2012, 15:53
One of my own devising, which (in variations) I've returned to frequently.

I started with a Cinnamon Whisky, Fireball, this is sold in Canada and the U.S. It is very sweet with a clean pure flavor of cinnamon, but I can't detect any whisky flavor in it. I am sure there is whisky there, probably Canadian whisky or some other type of a mild character, but the cinnamon and the sweetness dominate to the max.

I start by mixing it with bourbon, then I add some Canadian whisky, then some vodka for "display" (Scots blending term), then lots of rocks. One of the vodkas I added was a fairly congeneric craft vodka from a microdistillery.

When you get the balance right, it's really good. There is a light cinammon sweetness - away less than than the Fireball on its own - some good wood and whiskey flavours, and a light fruitiness.

Perfect as the weather warms.

Not sure what to call it, Glowing Orb maybe.

Gary

ratcheer
05-04-2012, 05:31
I mentioned my gin rickeys a few days ago. Well, I looked up the history of the drink and discovered that the original rickey was the bourbon rickey, invented in Washington DC in the late 19th century. It is now considered to be the drink of Washington, much as the Sazerac is the cocktail of New Orleans.

So, I tried one. I'm still on my diet, so I left out the sugar, but it was a good highball. Now I have two rickeys that I can have from time to time.

Tim

bigtoys
05-14-2012, 22:31
bought some "grenadine" made with tart cherries from quince and apple (husband wife team in Madison, WI) at Dose Market in Chicago on Sunday. Recommended with whisky.

Made this mini cocktail:
1 oz Lot B
few dashes Angostura orange bitters
1/4 oz Noilly Prat sweet vermouth
1/4 oz grenadine

my wife loved it.
then I added a little more bourbon and I loved it.

GreggJ
05-17-2012, 10:36
A couple of my Summer favorites. Since the Manhattan and Mint Julep are covered I will add something a little different.

My Own Recipe: Bastardized from a restaurant that I frequent. (They used Hendricks Gin instead of the La Poire and serve as a Martini not a highball. It was a little too sweet for me and I drank them too quick so I kind of adapted it into this. You can also remove the soda water and mix this as a Martini with good results.

-Fill Highball Glass with ice
-3oz Grey Goose La Poire (or any Pear Vodka)
-1oz St Germain
-Fill remaining space or to your liking with soda water add 2 lime wedges or a wedge of pear, if available, and enjoy the light and sweet goodness you have before you.

Perfect Margarita
-3oz Don Julio anejo
-.75oz Gran Marnier or St Germaine (2 very different flavors both with excellent results)
-Squeeze in 1/3 of a lime drop in shaker with ice
-shake
-Serve in cocktail glass over ice.

Enjoy!!

Young Blacksmith
05-17-2012, 18:18
That's a stout margarita! I prefer the same amount of limes to tequila. For 3 oz I would do 2.5-3 limes, juiced. Not persian limes, but mexican key limes, which are smaller, thinner skinned, and taste totally different.

I get them at my local Mercado.

Tonight is a margarita night, but a little different than fresh squeezed as there is some old low calorie margarita mix in the fridge that needs to be drank. 6 oz mix, 3-4 oz tequila, 1-2 oz Patron Orange Liquor. Sonic style ice, and I can sit on the porch for a while and watch the girls as my wife mows the fields..... ;)

steeltownbbq
05-17-2012, 19:16
lately it been a an Old Fashioned Turkey

3 part WT 101 Rye
1 part American Honey
few shakes of bitters over ice
lemon twist would be nice if I wasn't too lazy to get one

Happyhour24x7
05-17-2012, 20:14
I've thrown a Vieux Carre in the rotation from time to time. 1 part each rye, cognac, and sweet vermouth, dash each peychauds and angostura, half part Benedictine; shake and strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon twist. Nice drink with a lot going on.

smokinjoe
05-17-2012, 21:13
I've thrown a Vieux Carre in the rotation from time to time. 1 part each rye, cognac, and sweet vermouth, dash each peychauds and angostura, half part Benedictine; shake and strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon twist. Nice drink with a lot going on.

Very nice cocktail. I discovered this over the Christmas Holiday. Have enjoyed several, since. Plus, I like saying it with a thick accent... :D
:toast:

Kalessin
05-17-2012, 21:23
I've thrown a Vieux Carre in the rotation from time to time. 1 part each rye, cognac, and sweet vermouth, dash each peychauds and angostura, half part Benedictine; shake and strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon twist. Nice drink with a lot going on.

Which rye? What's the mixing congnac you're using? :)

Happyhour24x7
05-18-2012, 04:22
Which rye? What's the mixing congnac you're using? :)

Rittenhouse is my standard keep-around rye, but i'm going to start experimenting; I've been using Raynal VSOP- it's a decent quality low end mixing cognac. Vermouth is Dolin, and I've used Antica to good results as well.

cigarnv
05-18-2012, 07:41
Barrelled aged Manhattan's seem to be my cocktail of choice ... at least at this moment!! Always good, the barrel adds a nice softness and complexity and best of all they are already made!!!

Happyhour24x7
05-18-2012, 08:17
Barrelled aged Manhattan's seem to be my cocktail of choice ... at least at this moment!! Always good, the barrel adds a nice softness and complexity and best of all they are already made!!!

yeah Reid, you rubbed off on me...although my barrel is due for a refill. they are the perfect solution to that "it's been a hectic day and I still have two meetings left, but it's 5 o'clock so what the hell" problem....run downstairs, drain a little of the barrel, and back upstairs to work.

DaveOfAtl
05-18-2012, 08:35
I've thrown a Vieux Carre in the rotation from time to time. 1 part each rye, cognac, and sweet vermouth, dash each peychauds and angostura, half part Benedictine; shake and strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon twist. Nice drink with a lot going on.

A great cocktail indeed. Invented at the Hotel Monteleone in New Orleans in the 1930s to honor the demographic composition of the neighborhood at the time -- American whiskey, Italian vermouth, and French Cognac. There is still no better place to get one than at the Monteleone's Carousel bar.

GreggJ
05-18-2012, 11:56
That's a stout margarita! I prefer the same amount of limes to tequila. For 3 oz I would do 2.5-3 limes, juiced. Not persian limes, but mexican key limes, which are smaller, thinner skinned, and taste totally different.

I get them at my local Mercado.

It is stout but, man is it good. I had a buddy say the same thing. I told him "Hey you know me I'm f-ed up". Most people don't enjoy the taste of alcohol and add things like daquiri and margarita mix to mask or hide the taste of the alcohol. Where as I enjoy the taste and look for things to compliment the flavor of the alcohol not to hide it.

BTW I have implemented a 3 drink cap on these. Not many good things happen after 10oz of Tequila, trust me on that. :-)

I hear you on the limes. They make all the difference. Whenever I go to FL or down south the limes there are so much better I wish we could get the good stuff up here but, it is all the cheap imports and greenhouse variety. But, I know what you are talking about and those set the drink on another level.

Young Blacksmith
05-18-2012, 20:10
hehe, 10 oz of Tequila is a good cap. I had those two margaritas last night and had a hard time getting moving this morning..... I'm a Tequila Light weight...:lol:

Clavius
05-21-2012, 23:28
Vodka martini with Rain vodka and Mezzetta garlic stuffed queen olives!

ratcheer
05-22-2012, 07:25
Last evening before dinner, I had a Bourbon Rickey. Just bourbon, fresh squeezed lime (with the lime slice dropped into the glass after squeezing), club soda, and ice cubes. Very refreshing on a hot afternoon.

Tim

cigarnv
05-22-2012, 10:26
Last evening before dinner, I had a Bourbon Rickey. Just bourbon, fresh squeezed lime (with the lime slice dropped into the glass after squeezing), club soda, and ice cubes. Very refreshing on a hot afternoon.

Tim

Now that sounds like a great drink on a hot, humid afternoon...

cbus
05-24-2012, 14:33
I wasn't sure exactly where to put this question, so I will put it here. Does vermouth (sweet or dry) go bad if refrigerated and if so, about how long will a bottle last before this happens?

Trey Manthey
05-24-2012, 16:02
I wasn't sure exactly where to put this question, so I will put it here. Does vermouth (sweet or dry) go bad if refrigerated and if so, about how long will a bottle last before this happens?

I've always understood that it will go bad if it's NOT refrigerated.

I refrigerate, and usually go through about a bottle of each Noilly Prat (one dry, one red) every two months. I've never noticed a drop in quality.

Sometimes I'll accidentally leave the bottle out for a while (few hours, even overnight), and it's fine. Not ideal, but fine.

I recently opened a bottle of Carpano Antica, and I've been religiously sealing and vacuuming it after each use.

univibe88
05-24-2012, 18:13
I picked up on the "Southside Punch" at a bar in SF. It's kind of like a mojito made with gin.

3oz gin
1oz simple syrup
3/4 oz lemon juice
Shake with ice and some mint leaves

Pour into a highball glass with the ice, top with club soda and garnish with a mint sprig.

cigarnv
05-26-2012, 05:23
Hard to beat a few Bourbon / Rye and gingers especially if you have Blenheim red cap on hand

DaveOfAtl
05-26-2012, 13:18
Hard to beat a few Bourbon / Rye and gingers especially if you have Blenheim red cap on hand

Exactly what I'm having. The Blenheim red cap makes it. Perfect on a hot day. I add a lime wedge and a few dashes of orange bitters.

smokinjoe
05-26-2012, 14:02
Exactly what I'm having. The Blenheim red cap makes it. Perfect on a hot day. I add a lime wedge and a few dashes of orange bitters.

Dave, that Blenheim does make for a good mixer. If you like it's heat, give Red Rock a try. It's another one that will smack you around. :D

Sittin' out back this afternoon in the hot sun, and threw together a Patron Blanco with Sanpellegrino Aranciata Rossa Sparkling Blood Orange (3:1), over crushed ice, with a slice of orange, and some muddled mint. My first one was without the mint. The mint addition made the second one spectacular.

DaveOfAtl
05-26-2012, 14:11
Dave, that Blenheim does make for a good mixer. If you like it's heat, give Red Rock a try. It's another one that will smack you around. :D

Sittin' out back this afternoon in the hot sun, and threw together a Patron Blanco with Sanpellegrino Aranciata Rossa Sparkling Blood Orange (3:1), over crushed ice, with a slice of orange, and some muddled mint. My first one was without the mint. The mint addition made the second one spectacular.

I'll keep an eye out for the Red Rock. I definitely like a spicy ginger ale, and I've been mixing with the super spicy Jefferson's rye. By the way, that tequila cocktail sounds fantastic! Definitely trying that.

stiffchainey
05-26-2012, 16:32
For me: Whiskey Sour. I started to try around, and now all my friends can't get enuff of it. They chose it for their EURO 2012 Drink. I mix it with 4.5 oz bourbon, 1.5 sugar, 3.5 lemon, shake it with 3 ice cubes.

Does anyone know the classic recipe for a Mint Julep?

Thanks
Stiff

univibe88
05-26-2012, 19:01
Does anyone know the classic recipe for a Mint Julep?

Thanks
Stiff

You may be sorry you asked!

http://www.thebucknerhome.com/julep/recipe.html

ratcheer
05-27-2012, 09:52
I'll keep an eye out for the Red Rock. I definitely like a spicy ginger ale, and I've been mixing with the super spicy Jefferson's rye. By the way, that tequila cocktail sounds fantastic! Definitely trying that.

Then, you should also look for Buffalo Rock. It is made and distributed in Birmingham, AL by our Pepsi bottler. It claims to still be made from a Civil War era recipe, although I seriously doubt it. It is bold, spicy, and dark.

Tim

smokinjoe
05-27-2012, 12:32
Cloudless, hot day. Absolutely, nothing that needs my attention (except, maybe the grass needs cut, but that can wait). Enjoying the feeling with a Corsair Gin and White Rock Tonic. Crushed ice. Wedge of lime. Nice.

bllygthrd
05-27-2012, 12:55
Wife: Tanqueray & Tonic
Son-in-law: Newcastle Brown Ale
Daughter (with child): Lemonade
Me: AAA 10 Star on the rocks

Marlene made some Lime & White Chocolate Cookies, they go very well with bourbon & branch.

tommyboy38
05-28-2012, 15:15
Whiskey sours with some cheap sweet n sour mix I found in the liquor cabinet....hopefully more planning and real lemon juice next time.

bllygthrd
05-28-2012, 16:02
Just finished Bernie Lubbers' book. Made Ms. Annis' Bourbon Sours for the family. Got mixed reviews. My only complaint ... the funny color that resulted from mixing the bourbon, OJ and frozen lemonaid.

funknik
05-28-2012, 16:30
a JRPS 17yr Mint Julep on this sunny Memorial Day . . . don't know if it's sacreligel, but it's the best damn julep I've ever had.
Correction: the 2009 WLW Julep I just made is the best damn julep ever - listening to Led Zeppelin IV on vinyl while sweeping my outdoors patio . . . holiday indeed!

Kalessin
05-28-2012, 21:08
I haven't been refrigerating my vermouth, but I do try to keep it in a cool, dark place. Right now it's in the cabinet bar in the living room, and as summer heats up, it'll go downstairs to a wine box in the basement where it can stay cool.

If it changes away from the original flavor, I'll replace the bottle.

cbus
05-30-2012, 19:44
Vieux Carre tonight. Will probably have a Whiskey Sour as well. Don't like using a lemon for just a garnish...

ratcheer
05-31-2012, 06:31
I made an off-the-cuff cocktail last night that turned out pretty well. I invented it myself, although I know I am probably not the first person to have ever done so.

I had the Negroni cocktail in mind, but I do not have the ingredients to make that. So, I took a shot of Tanqueray gin, several dashes of Angostura bitters, and a healthy splash of sweet vermouth. Then I filled the glass with ice cubes and topped it off with club soda.

It was somewhat sweeter than I expected, but overall quite good.

Tim

Trey Manthey
06-02-2012, 15:43
I made an off-the-cuff cocktail last night that turned out pretty well. I invented it myself, although I know I am probably not the first person to have ever done so.

I had the Negroni cocktail in mind, but I do not have the ingredients to make that. So, I took a shot of Tanqueray gin, several dashes of Angostura bitters, and a healthy splash of sweet vermouth. Then I filled the glass with ice cubes and topped it off with club soda.

It was somewhat sweeter than I expected, but overall quite good.

Tim

That sounds like a smart substitute. I would recommend anyone to keep a bottle Campari around. It's not for everyone, but I think most people that like a straight bourbon would enjoy the bitterness of a Negroni or Boulevardier.

savagehenry
06-03-2012, 19:07
Enjoyed my first Kentucky Mule, in the proper copper mule mug. Delicious! Used about 1 3/4 shots of WTRB. I see why it's called a mule, it kicked my ass!

ratcheer
06-04-2012, 06:49
That sounds like a smart substitute. I would recommend anyone to keep a bottle Campari around. It's not for everyone, but I think most people that like a straight bourbon would enjoy the bitterness of a Negroni or Boulevardier.

Thank you, Trey. Of course, Campari is one of the many things I cannot get in my ABC state of Alabama.

Tim

mrt
06-06-2012, 14:28
Hello all,

1. Mint julep. Prepared with simple syrup. Refreshing!
2. Bourbon&Ginger Ale on ice cubes. Relaxing :)

Regards,

White Dog
06-07-2012, 11:24
About a week ago we had a really hot day. I came outside to join the wife and kids who were gardening, and I was carrying a glass of brown liquid with two ice cubes. (Please note that I drink 99% of my whiskey neat, but it was a very hot day.)

Wife: Whatcha got there?

Me: I invented a new drink. The Kentucky Spritzer.

Wife: Fun. What is it?

Me: Bourbon on the rocks!

Wife: So no actual spritz? You idiot.

ratcheer
06-08-2012, 08:27
Wife: Whatcha got there?

Me: I invented a new drink. The Kentucky Spritzer.

Wife: Fun. What is it?

Me: Bourbon on the rocks!

Wife: So no actual spritz? You idiot.

I had a bourbon with club soda a couple of nights ago. It was pretty nice.

Related question: I always thought club soda was just a more modern version of seltzer water. But now, I am seeing both in the stores. What, if anything, is the difference?

Tim

Tucker
06-08-2012, 08:35
Related question: I always thought club soda was just a more modern version of seltzer water. But now, I am seeing both in the stores. What, if anything, is the difference?

Tim

Seltzer is sparkling water. Club soda is carbonated water and includes sodium bicarbonate.

ratcheer
06-09-2012, 09:30
Seltzer is sparkling water. Club soda is carbonated water and includes sodium bicarbonate.

As far as I know, "sparkling water" is just carbonated water. Am I wrong?

Tim

univibe88
06-12-2012, 10:33
I had a bourbon with club soda a couple of nights ago. It was pretty nice.

Related question: I always thought club soda was just a more modern version of seltzer water. But now, I am seeing both in the stores. What, if anything, is the difference?

Tim

I really like OGD and soda.

jcg9779
06-13-2012, 15:32
As far as I know, "sparkling water" is just carbonated water. Am I wrong?

Tim

I think the difference is that sparkling water has naturally occurring carbonation and soda water has the carbonation added.

In regard to soda vs. seltzer: club soda has more sodium than seltzer as well as biocarbonate of soda, which Doug mentioned.

jcg9779
06-13-2012, 17:12
Going with an old fashioned tonight. Very tasty

ratcheer
06-14-2012, 05:37
I think the difference is that sparkling water has naturally occurring carbonation and soda water has the carbonation added.

In regard to soda vs. seltzer: club soda has more sodium than seltzer as well as biocarbonate of soda, which Doug mentioned.

Duh! I just looked at the bottle, which labels its ingredients. Why didn't I think about that before? Anyway, it is labeled as "sodium free" and my particular bottle contains carbonated water and potassium bicarbonate. I guess it is to make it taste like mineral water.

I prefer Perrier, which is naturally carbonated mineral water but, man, is it expensive! I used to buy a U.S. sourced brand called Quibel, but I can no longer find it. That was 15 years or so ago.

Thanks for the help.

Tim

jcg9779
06-18-2012, 18:43
Another old fashioned tonight...I don't know why these have been tasting so good lately (it is helping me drink my living bottle though, which doesn't taste especially good on its own).

compliance
06-20-2012, 00:30
Gin and tonic that I made into sorbet. It worked OK. Tastes good but you have to go light on the gin or it won't freeze.

Happyhour24x7
06-20-2012, 04:11
Great manhattan last night. Rittenhouse with Dolin, and used some Fee brothers black walnut bitters. Really added new depth and flavor.

yountvillewjs
06-20-2012, 15:11
Great manhattan last night. Rittenhouse with Dolin, and used some Fee brothers black walnut bitters. Really added new depth and flavor.

Ritt & Dolin were made for each other. I picked up some Miracle Mile 'Forbidden' bitters -- loving them. Also picked up some Fee Brothers Barrel Aged bitters, but haven't cracked into them yet. Will keep an eye out for the Black Walnut bitters.

Happyhour24x7
06-21-2012, 04:08
Yeah, the barrel aged bitters are fantastic. The black walnut is good, but doesnt always work, depending on the whiskey. What's the story on the Forbidden bitters?

yountvillewjs
06-21-2012, 06:15
Yeah, the barrel aged bitters are fantastic. The black walnut is good, but doesnt always work, depending on the whiskey. What's the story on the Forbidden bitters?

To be honest, I don't know much about them. Only picked them up on a recommendation from someone here in Chat one night. They are terrific and they seem to be doing some interesting things on the whole. http://www.klwines.com/detail.asp?sku=1072882

ratcheer
06-21-2012, 06:49
I got my first bottle of straight rye whiskey a few days ago, the Bulleit. Yesterday afternoon, I made a Sazerac cocktail with it. It was excellent, without the in-your-face bourbon flavor, but much more flavorful than, say, Seagram's 7.

Tim

BFerguson
06-24-2012, 18:26
A simple mint julep while tending the grill tonight. Icy cold goodness on a warm humid day. Just some gold label HH 8yr. Nothing fancy, but works well.

B

smokinjoe
06-30-2012, 14:38
Loving this Corsair Gin & Seagrams Tonic while listening to Braves and Nats on the radio on this 105 degree day. The Corsair makes for a nice change-up to the normal junipery Gins I'm used to. More vegetal. I went with a slice of lemon instead of lime. Sour it up a bit, and it works. BTW, today may be one of the few days in his career that Stephen Strasburg's best fastball of the day is not higher than the temp...:D

bigtoys
07-02-2012, 21:55
Rush St. Manhattan from Gibson's Steakhouse
3:1:1 (just like TSA--what you can carry on a plane)
Bourbon (they use WR; I used WRDO):Sweet Vermouth (I used Noilly Prat):Heering Cherry Liquer and some orange bitters

their version
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/6a156575.jpg
my version and ingredients
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0524-1.jpghttp://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0530.jpg

Happyhour24x7
07-03-2012, 04:30
Sounds similar to Manhattans neighbor, the Brooklyn, that I had last night. Bourbon, WT in this case, dry vermouth, maraschino, and bitters....very tasty, a little lighter and sweeter than your average Manhattan-perfect for a summer night.

DaveOfAtl
07-05-2012, 07:51
Enjoyed several Brown Derby's yesterday (1.5 oz bourbon, 1 oz fresh grapefruit juice, 0.5 oz honey syrup), which I made with Wathens. These were a big hit and a really nice way to enjoy bourbon on a scorching hot day.

smokinjoe
07-07-2012, 15:39
After a good long run and cutting the grass, I figured it was cocktail time on this hot scorcher of a day. Threw together some Four Roses Yellow Label, SanPellegrino Limonata, Bitter Truth Lemon Bitters, and Grand Marnier, over a heaping glass of ice. Put on the water mister, and relaxed in the sun. Ahhhh....very nice....Now, it's din-din time...

cigarnv
07-07-2012, 17:12
So damn hot up here that only a tall rye and ginger hits the spot if I am outside....

Young Blacksmith
07-08-2012, 20:05
Made a few highballs today - ice, Pechyaud's bitters, ginger ale, and :

RR Rye - great taste, rye and ginger ale were made for each other!
Berhneim WW - not so great, but a decent way to use up open bottles I just don't visit that often.

Tucker
07-14-2012, 19:49
After much bourbon and rye last evening at the GBS meeting, today I changed things up with a nice cold Negroni made with Carpano Antica vermouth (excellent in a Manhattan, also).

OscarV
07-28-2012, 14:51
Pimm's Cup anyone?
Would be good while watching the London games.

univibe88
07-28-2012, 15:47
Pimm's Cup anyone?
Would be good while watching the London games.

Yes please! I like to add a little extra gin.

bigtoys
08-05-2012, 21:26
Mojito with Leblon Cachaca

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0991.jpg

luv2hunt
08-06-2012, 19:23
It's summer time drinks boys! Rum runners, Green Gators, and Funky Monkeys in a gallon jug available on pool days here at our house!!

imbibehour
08-08-2012, 11:51
Summer are plenty of Gin and Tonics, Fizzes, Mojitos since the mint I am growing is hitting gang busters, then the bourbon is getting used up in Old Fashioneds. Never tire of an old fashioned.

petrel800
08-19-2012, 09:52
Tried some French 75 coctails last night with the No 3 Gin. Turned out to be excellent pre-dinner drinks.

jcg9779
08-20-2012, 14:05
Tried some French 75 coctails last night with the No 3 Gin. Turned out to be excellent pre-dinner drinks.

I made a copule of these for the girlfriend (who is on a sparkling wine kick) this past weekend as well. She really enjoyed them.

GreggJ
08-22-2012, 08:32
Went to a restaurant and had what they call a Crimson Creole. It was goo but a little sweet. So I went back home and tinkered with their recipe and came away with a real winner.

Restaurants Version:
Makers Mark
Orange Juice
Ginger Ale
Creole Bitters.

My Version:
Fill rocks glass 2/3 with ice
OWA 107 about (50% filled about 3oz)
Grand Marinier (Add a little less than 1oz)
4-5 Drops of Creole Bitters
Club Soda (Fill remainder of rocks glass) and stir gently.

My version is clean and light with a really nice flavor to it. Definitely happy with the end result has been my go to summer drink now for the last 2 weeks, I can't get enough. I defintely recommend giving it a try. If you do let me know what you think it

Young Blacksmith
08-22-2012, 16:38
what is creole bitters? a brand or a general type? Sounds pretty good to me!

GreggJ
08-23-2012, 13:13
what is creole bitters? a brand or a general type? Sounds pretty good to me!

Ya the creole is a type of bitters. I bought a little sampler box from our local pusher and it had it in there with a few other types. After quite a few glasses of this drink the creole does have a pretty unique flavor that pairs really well with the orange liquour and well anything pairs well with good bourbon. :-)

Anyhow, I had another one last night and I gotta say this is definitely a winner for me.

scratchline
08-23-2012, 16:24
Creole Bitters are a top shelf version of Peychaud. Different but similar.

I'm enjoying a Manhattan with Knob Creek Rye. Finally arrived in NYC. Passed it up at 46 dollars downtown and then walked into an uptown shop that had it for 23.99. At that price, I'll buy multiple bottles. Must be some kind of introductory promotional price (or mistake); get them hooked at 24 and then jack the price up to 35 plus. I've been stockpiling the WT 101 rye at the mid-20 mark and passed up a few bottles at 20 the other day. My initial impression is that the KC rye has a thicker mouthfeel and a little more mint in the mix. A very nice rye priced in the mid-20s. Not 10+ dollars better than WT 101. The only trick is finding the WT.

http://vermouth101.com/images/cocchi-vermouth.jpg

Using this vermouth.

http://www.tillenfarms.com/Bada-Bing-Cherries/p/TIL-00021&c=TillenFarms@Cherries

And these cherries.

http://bokersbitters.co.uk/bokers_ver2.html

And these bitters.

It all works together very well.

-Mike

Smithford
08-27-2012, 18:57
I'll be visiting NYC in October. If the KC is still available for $24 (or the WT is available for any price), I'll need to hit you up for the address. :searching:

Myself, I'm trying to perfect the Sazerac. It looks like I prefer it on the rocks. Not traditional, I know, but it makes for a nice cool down on a hot summer night. I can't get the Herbsaint rinse right. I keep spilling it over the rim which makes a sticky mess. Oh well, I'll never be a bartender I guess.

Happyhour24x7
08-28-2012, 04:13
Had an interesting cocktail while out the other night, called a Cin-Cin. Not sure about the spelling. Equal parts Cynar, rye, and sweet vermouth, with bitters, shaken and served up with a burnt lemon peel. Pretty cool drink.

unclebunk
08-28-2012, 05:04
Just a couple of fabulous margaritas with dinner last night which really hit the spot after a long, hot day here in Chicago. Really looking forward to some autumnal evenings which are hopefully just around the corner.

unclebunk
08-28-2012, 05:09
Creole Bitters are a top shelf version of Peychaud. Different but similar.

I'm enjoying a Manhattan with Knob Creek Rye. Finally arrived in NYC. Passed it up at 46 dollars downtown and then walked into an uptown shop that had it for 23.99. At that price, I'll buy multiple bottles. Must be some kind of introductory promotional price (or mistake); get them hooked at 24 and then jack the price up to 35 plus. I've been stockpiling the WT 101 rye at the mid-20 mark and passed up a few bottles at 20 the other day. My initial impression is that the KC rye has a thicker mouthfeel and a little more mint in the mix. A very nice rye priced in the mid-20s. Not 10+ dollars better than WT 101. The only trick is finding the WT.

http://vermouth101.com/images/cocchi-vermouth.jpg

Using this vermouth.

http://www.tillenfarms.com/Bada-Bing-Cherries/p/TIL-00021&c=TillenFarms@Cherries

And these cherries.

http://bokersbitters.co.uk/bokers_ver2.html

And these bitters.

It all works together very well.

-Mike

Those are some decent prices, and the cocktail sounds terrific. I'm with you on the KC Rye. At $24 it's excellent value for money but once they jack the price, maybe not so much. Like so many others, I still can't understand why WT knocked off their delicious and highly affordable rye. What a shame.

WAINWRIGHT
08-28-2012, 18:11
Made a couple of Manhattans using Cinzano Rosso,Willett 117.6prf.,Peychaud's Bitters and White and Shaw Maraschino cherries.The proof of the Willett rye played quite nicely with the sweetness of the cherries and vermouth,proving to be delicious and surprisingly balanced given the high proof of the rye.

Trey Manthey
09-13-2012, 21:35
This recipe caught my eye, the Oaxaca Old Fashioned:
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/08/the-oaxaca-old-fashioned-cocktail-tequila-mezcal-recipe.html

Called for two ingredients that I didn't have on hand, but didn't mind picking up some mezcal and Bitterman's mole bitters.

Whipped one up this evening and fell in love. Strong, sweet, spicy, smoky, and smooth.

smokinjoe
09-30-2012, 14:34
Lazing around on a coolish, dark, on-and-off light rainy day, with my first ever Dry Manhattan. 2.5:1 SB 1792 bourbon to Dolin dry vermouth, 2 shakes Bitter Truth Lemon Bitters, and a twist of lemon. Nice cocktail. Much nicer, as while I type this, the Falcons just kicked a game-winning FG over Carolina w/5 seconds left on the clock, after starting the drive from their own 1 yd line and less than a minute to go...I guess all of these factors means it's time for another!

Gillman
09-30-2012, 16:35
That sounds good, with a Dry Manhattan, it is good to go a little easy on the vermouth and use a rich bourbon, which this does.

I've got a 1:1 blending of my own blend of (30+) rums and Captain Morgan Black Spiced Rum. The Black is a 47.3% ABV ratchet up of the regular Captain Morgan Spiced Rum. The label states it is finished in "double charred blackened oak" - not quite sure what that is. I was a little disappointed in the Black, the rum flavor seems well in the background and the top notes I get are sweetness, bitterness from the quassia and a cinnamon or nutmeg note. It's okay, but I wanted more rum character, hence the blending, which is much better, IMO. What made it a cocktail is a splash of soda and Stirring Orange Bitters (same bottle Wade pointed me to in Santa Rosa some years ago). Pondering on it further, not sure it's a cocktail. But it's good. :)

Gary

smokinjoe
10-01-2012, 08:40
Thanks, Gary. I even went further in that vein on my second. I lightened up the Vermouth by about 1/3. And, went with OGD 114 for the bourbon. Worked very well, and was noticeably different from the first. OGD has such an interesting house style that really contributes to a unique cocktail. I'll say this, I enjoyed these dry Manhattans more than the sweet versions that I have made. After trying several brands, and several years of tinkering with cocktails made with it, I have concluded that I am just not a sweet vermouth fan. Something about it doesn't hit me right. I am looking forward to 'sperimentin' with the dry.

Trey Manthey
11-20-2012, 11:09
I've been making Vespers lately. Partly as an homage to Bond, but also because I'm flush with some interesting gins. Favorite recipe is 1.5 oz Martin Miller's Westbourne, 0.75 oz vodka, 0.5 oz Cocci Americano, shaken, garnish with flamed orange peel and 3 drops of Angostura bitters.

Also, I was gifted a set of Bittercube bitters, and have been enjoying combining these with some old classics.

DaveOfAtl
12-14-2012, 09:59
Well, it ain't Spring/Summer 2012, but it ain't Winter yet either, so I guess I'll post here. Had a few great Manhattans last night with Cocchi Vermouth di Torino and Boker's Bitters. Played around with the whiskey. Had one with a 4 year Willett SB rye (110 pf), one with Larceny, and one with the GBS EC 15 year. All were excellent. I had never had the Boker's before, and they are a nice alternative to Angostura.

squire
12-14-2012, 12:23
Found a bottle of Fee Bros. bitters in the back of the pantry yesterday and may find a use for these.

Alphanumeric
12-19-2012, 21:22
Tonight is a Handy Sazerac. The barrel proof kick is great and makes me question why I don't use it for every Sazerac. Then I come back down to Earth and enjoy this as the rare treat that it is.

squire
12-20-2012, 12:59
Sazerac is exactly what I had in mind.

smokinjoe
01-05-2013, 15:32
Y'all, I just gotta change things up, from all this whiskey, other dark spirits, and heavy beers I've been working on the last several weeks. So, I felt like a Gin & Tonic. Hendrick's for the gin. Aaaaahhhhhh.....Refreshing!!!

OK, now that's over, I'm gonna dig in the bunker for somethin' whiskyish that I ain't had in awhile.

squire
01-05-2013, 16:00
Confession is good for the soul Joe, now go and sin no more.

smokinjoe
01-05-2013, 16:17
Confession is good for the soul Joe, now go and sin no more.

Thank you, Father. :pope:




But, I gotta admit....it was good!! :70358-devil:

:toast:

tanstaafl2
01-05-2013, 16:43
A winter cocktail I came across on another website which I tried and found to be delicious. Perfect for winter as the name suggests!

Winter Waltz
2 oz rye (I used Bulleit for a little rye kick. May try one of the Willet overproof LDI/MGP/XYZ ryes for a little more "oomph" )
1/2 oz Averna
1/4 oz St Elizabeth allspice dram
2 dashes Angostura bitters
Stirred with ice and served up.
Star anise garnish.

Barclay Beach
01-06-2013, 15:30
Bought some Carpano Antica vermouth today, which only remained unopened for an hour before being incoporporated into a manhattan with some Rittenhouse. Went down easy.