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cowdery
05-10-2012, 12:38
Personally, I prefer it when producers are public companies, because they routinely report information of interest. For example, this from MGPI's First Quarter Results Statement. MGPI is the new owner of LDI.

"Also in the current quarter, the Company recorded initial sales, including premium bourbon and whiskeys, from its recently-acquired distillery in Lawrenceburg, Ind. Operational improvements are underway at the facility under new leadership, complemented by a stronger sales and marketing team."

I wish they would phrase it as "premium bourbon and other whiskeys," but they'll get there eventually.

weller_tex
05-10-2012, 13:42
Personally, I prefer it when producers are public companies, because they routinely report information of interest. For example, this from MGPI's First Quarter Results Statement. MGPI is the new owner of LDI.

"Also in the current quarter, the Company recorded initial sales, including premium bourbon and whiskeys, from its recently-acquired distillery in Lawrenceburg, Ind. Operational improvements are underway at the facility under new leadership, complemented by a stronger sales and marketing team."

I wish they would phrase it as "premium bourbon and other whiskeys," but they'll get there eventually.
You'd be shocked at how many people think that Bourbon and Scotch aren't whisk(e)ys. They think they are just called Bourbon and Scotch, and that whisk(e)y is blended, or Canadian or Irish. I hear this about once a week somewhere..

cowdery
05-10-2012, 14:35
i know. One of the most common questions I'm asked is "what's the difference between bourbon and whiskey?" or "what's the difference between scotch and whiskey?"

CorvallisCracker
05-10-2012, 16:38
If I ever meet Don McClean I'm going to ask him to explain the difference between whiskey and rye.

Bourbon Boiler
05-10-2012, 19:41
Is the statement calling all of their bourbons "premium"? My (limited) understanding was that they had 3 mashbills each sold as unaged, 2 year, 3 year, or 4 year.

Nizdar
05-11-2012, 00:33
If I ever meet Don McClean I'm going to ask him to explain the difference between whiskey and rye.

Listen to the song about 10 times. Really focus on that line. I am fairly confident that the line is really "drinking whiskey in Rye." Rye, New York is an NYC suburb, and I have read some stuff online that suggests this actually makes some sense giving McClean's background.

I am a bit biased, though. I prefer the version that makes sense.

sutton
05-11-2012, 04:33
Listen to the song about 10 times. Really focus on that line. I am fairly confident that the line is really "drinking whiskey in Rye." Rye, New York is an NYC suburb, and I have read some stuff online that suggests this actually makes some sense giving McClean's background.

I am a bit biased, though. I prefer the version that makes sense.


And according to this web-site, you would be correct!

http://www.lyrics007.com/Don%20McLean%20Lyrics/American%20Pie%20Lyrics.html

[Chorus]
Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
Them good ole boys were drinking whiskey in Rye
Singin' this'll be the day that I die
This'll be the day that I die

unclebunk
05-11-2012, 07:12
Listen to the song about 10 times. Really focus on that line. I am fairly confident that the line is really "drinking whiskey in Rye." Rye, New York is an NYC suburb, and I have read some stuff online that suggests this actually makes some sense giving McClean's background.

I am a bit biased, though. I prefer the version that makes sense.


And according to this web-site, you would be correct!

http://www.lyrics007.com/Don%20McLean%20Lyrics/American%20Pie%20Lyrics.html

[Chorus]
Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
Them good ole boys were drinking whiskey in Rye
Singin' this'll be the day that I die
This'll be the day that I die

The tune sleuths solve the puzzle. Good job!

weller_tex
05-11-2012, 07:38
And according to this web-site, you would be correct!

http://www.lyrics007.com/Don%20McLean%20Lyrics/American%20Pie%20Lyrics.html

[Chorus]
Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
Them good ole boys were drinking whiskey in Rye
Singin' this'll be the day that I die
This'll be the day that I die
Always thought it was whiskey and rye..learn something new everyday. Hard to understand a lot of lyrics. I could swear CCR's "Bad Moon on the Rise" says "There is a bathroom on the right":lol:

Gillman
05-11-2012, 08:40
I read some years ago that Don McCLean did mean whiskey in Rye, a town of that name. Of course, as a poet, I am sure he was not unaware of the double meaning, he was probably playing a word game as well. Bob Dylan often does, too.

It's a great song, one of the best folk-rock tunes ever.

Gary

CorvallisCracker
05-11-2012, 10:44
Listen to the song about 10 times.

That would be, like, nine times too many.



Really focus on that line. I am fairly confident that the line is really "drinking whiskey in Rye." Rye, New York is an NYC suburb, and I have read some stuff online that suggests this actually makes some sense giving McClean's background.

There are good ol' boys in NYC suburbs?



I am a bit biased, though. I prefer the version that makes sense.

Trying to superimpose order onto a random universe? Good luck with that.

Flyfish
05-11-2012, 12:32
And according to this web-site, you would be correct!

http://www.lyrics007.com/Don%20McLean%20Lyrics/American%20Pie%20Lyrics.html

[Chorus]
Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
Them good ole boys were drinking whiskey in Rye
Singin' this'll be the day that I die
This'll be the day that I die
Let me get this straight, there are "good ole boys" in Rye, NY and there is also a levee there too? Next you'll be telling me that they plant 'taters and cotton. And they die by jumping off the Tallahatchee Bridge which, of course, connects Rye with Natchez.

sutton
05-11-2012, 17:01
Let me get this straight, there are "good ole boys" in Rye, NY and there is also a levee there too? Next you'll be telling me that they plant 'taters and cotton. And they die by jumping off the Tallahatchee Bridge which, of course, connects Rye with Natchez.

:grin: Never take a poet literally, I guess. Hunt and peck around the internet a bit, and you'll find another explanation/interpretation, that says that McLean's home was New Rochelle, NY, which had a bar called "The Levee." The bar shut down or "went dry," causing patrons to drive across the river to Rye, NY.

cowdery
05-11-2012, 17:16
Okay. You've forced me to tell my Don McLean "American Pie" story.

It was 1970 or 71, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. I was attending a conference for college students involved in campus radio and, naturally, the big sponsors were the record companies. I had just attended some seminar in a classroom. A record company guy came in and announced that if we would hang around for a couple minutes, he had something special for us. About 15 of us stayed. In came a guy with a guitar. We formed a circle around him and he performed this song called "American Pie," that was about to be released. No one had ever heard of Don McLean, of course, and that was the first time any of us heard "American Pie."

Of course we had no idea it was going to become a mega-hit and one of the most iconic songs of all time. What we remembered was that McLean was a bit of an asshole. Arrogant, surly and aloof, he wasn't the least bit friendly, even though he was about our age. He seemed to have a great big chip on his shoulder. I remember looking at the top of his head because he was a lot shorter than me, kept his head down, and didn't make eye contact when he talked or, for that matter, when he sang.

Melanie Safka, later that night, was much friendlier.

sutton
05-11-2012, 17:22
That's a great story, Chuck!

Maybe he just appeared to be an asshole; you know, artists are such troubled souls ... he was just misunderstood. :rolleyes:

sutton
05-11-2012, 17:46
And to continue the thread drift on American Pie, here is an article published exactly one year ago on this topic ...

http://mysoundreport.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1309:searching-for-a-piece-of-american-pie-in-new-rochelle&catid=37:columns&Itemid=55

ILLfarmboy
05-11-2012, 18:27
i know. One of the most common questions I'm asked is "what's the difference between bourbon and whiskey?" or "what's the difference between scotch and whiskey?"

I always say its the same as the difference between Coke and pop (or soda if you don't call it pop in your area)

It gets the point across.

jburlowski
05-12-2012, 07:22
I gotta believe that there's someone in MGPI's marketing department reporting the good news that their press release generated all these posts in only two days. :lol:

Kalessin
05-12-2012, 10:01
You don't have to go too far north of New Rochelle and Rye to find upstate NY "good ole boys". By the time you get to Chatham and Hinsdale, even now forty years later, you'll find a whole lot of farming and other agriculture-related activity, and some definite, proud-to-be rednecks.

And arrogant, surly, chip-on-the-shoulder folk-rock singer-songwriters? There's still no shortage of 'em. :grin:

StraightNoChaser
05-12-2012, 11:53
i know. One of the most common questions I'm asked is "what's the difference between bourbon and whiskey?" or "what's the difference between scotch and whiskey?"
Nowhere near as bad as someone asking you what the difference is between X vodka and Y vodka.

I just look them straight in the eye and say "The label."

tmckenzie
05-12-2012, 18:53
You don't have to go too far north of New Rochelle and Rye to find upstate NY "good ole boys". By the time you get to Chatham and Hinsdale, even now forty years later, you'll find a whole lot of farming and other agriculture-related activity, and some definite, proud-to-be rednecks.

And arrogant, surly, chip-on-the-shoulder folk-rock singer-songwriters? There's still no shortage of 'em. :grin:

You can say that again. I grew up in the south and there are way more good ole boy types up than where I grew up. Good folks too.