PDA

View Full Version : Gin forum



spence21989
05-17-2012, 00:26
Any other gin lovers out there? I really enjoy gin and, unlike most microdistilled whiskey, I think that a lot of the microdistilled gins are a great value. Leopold's Gin is a favorite of mine and I have been itching to try their new Navy Strength Gin. Rob's Mtn. Gin is another great local one from Boulder. The gin industry has really been in a boom lately and its fun to see how much the gin shelves at liquor stores have grown.

ratcheer
05-17-2012, 05:52
I love gin, but I mostly enjoy the old standards: Beefeater, Bombay, Tanqueray, in that order. And I mean just the standard bottlings, too.

Tim

unclebunk
05-17-2012, 05:59
My wife is English and a big gin lover, so we tend to throw back a fair number of gin and tonics during the summer. She's gotten hooked on Tanqueray Rangpur in recent years but used to be a dedicated Boodles drinker (reportedly Winston Churchill's gin of choice). I'm happy with most brand name gins in my g&t's as long as they are made right.

Kalessin
05-17-2012, 09:12
I've been drinking more bourbon and rye, but summer is coming, which for me means refreshing gin and tonics. I also like gin martinis (three giant olives, don't be scared of the vermouth!).

Currently open in my bar is a bottle of Hendricks for martinis, and a bottle of Tanqueray for tonics. The lliter of Tanq was discovered only a few weeks ago in a box from when I moved in 2009... serendipity!


I like many of the craft distillery offerings. Since startup business plans generally involve selling unaged (or very short-aged) spirits, gin is a distinctive product they can get right out the door and start making a profit on (most of them make vodka, but I still don't get the market for unflavored GNS in a fancy bottle, but it seems to keep the craft people in business).

Berkshire Mountain Distillers is in Western Mass, and they produce a great everyday pour, Greylock Gin (80 pf), local to me costing around $26/750ml. They also make a fantastic limited-edition Ethereal Gin (86pf), where they change the recipe every once in a while, costing around $35/750ml.

spence21989
05-17-2012, 12:43
I rarely drink gin neat (only for tasting purposes) but almost always drink my gin with tonic. It really is a fantastically simple drink to make and can be very complex depending on the gin.

Bombay sapphire is what really got me into gin but I have also enjoyed other gins from the big guys like the tangurary rangpur and recently i have really enjoyed Hendricks.

Kalessin, I will be in that are this summer so I may try to find a bottle of the Berkshire gin. Is it widely available in most stores in MA? Do you know about VT and NY?

I've been wanting to try to make my own tonic as I have a full kegging system from homebrewing. has anyone done this and have a trusted recipe?

Bmac
05-17-2012, 14:01
I do like a martini from time to time. I got a huge handle of Bombay Saphire gin and a 350ml of Tanquray regular. I have to say i perfer Bombay.

A lot of people i know have been trying to get me to try Hendrix, but the thought of cucumbers stops me :(

Clavius
05-17-2012, 16:24
I like regular Bombay for martini's and Bombay Sapphire for Gin & Tonic's. I want to try Plymouth for martini's. I've read that it is pretty good stuff.

Kalessin
05-17-2012, 20:28
The Berkshire Mountain gins can be found all over Massachusetts, and most likely southern VT and eastern upstate NY. I can be of help with specific stores in many areas of MA, and I think the NH state liquor stores carry it.

AaronWF
05-18-2012, 08:38
When I discovered Leopold's gin, I went through a little phase of drinking it on the rocks with a couple garlic olives. Outstanding stuff! I love Plymouth in a martini. Unfortunately, I have found that gin goes right to my head, and that is something my wife cannot tolerate.

I still have an unopened bottle of Leopold's in my cabinet. I don't like mixing gin and whiskey in the same night, and I just haven't had the heart to cut the brown out of the mix on a drinking night, so my gins have remained untouched for quite a while at this point.

Happyhour24x7
05-18-2012, 09:21
I'm with you Aaron, one of my rock solid rules is not to mix the clear and the brown on the same night. So, I have bourbon nights, and martini nights! the Leopold's and Berkshire mountain gins mentioned earlier are very good; Plymouth, Hendrick's, and Bombay (white) are my keep-around selections. For me, I stay away from the heavy Juniper, spicy gins; but if you like that kind, check out Junipero from SF and Bluecoat from Philly, both excellent in that category. #209 from SF fits more into the smooth, floral style I prefer, and is a regular favorite. Citadel also makes a nice gin, and they also bottle a slightly aged expression, which adds a whole new dimension. Sunset Hills from Bowman is smooth, but a little on the thin side; doesn't bring quite enough to the party. Smooth Ambler gin is...a work in progress (John, if you read this, don't hate me!) There is also a new gin called the Botanist that is from Bruichladdich; I've tasted in a bar and it was phenomenal. My first bottle is en route as we speak. Now, all these recommendations are purely from the martini perspective; they could completely change in when added to tonic or other cocktails, so individual results may vary.

spence21989
05-18-2012, 10:02
Citadel also makes a nice gin

I just finished a bottle of this a few nights ago. It was decent and I would consider replacing it if I found it on sale (it's already pretty cheap - 24 bucks IRRC). That said, I'm also in no rush to go out to the store and get another.

This distiller at Roundhouse spirits told me that if I enjoyed citadel then I should try Magellan and that magellan blows citadel out of the water.


There is also a new gin called the Botanist that is from Bruichladdich; I've tasted in a bar and it was phenomenal. My first bottle is en route as we speak.

Saw this at the store yesterday and was intrigued. I received a $5 off coupon while I was there for any product so I think I will go back for a bottle of this.

SmoothAmbler
05-21-2012, 04:33
Ah, no hate Happyhour24x7.

I haven't had The Botanist yet, but I will now.

Happyhour24x7
05-21-2012, 05:55
Hey John, have you decided whether or not to bottle any of your aged gin? I found that to be quite interesting.

smokinjoe
05-21-2012, 06:57
I have entirely switched over to Citadel from Tanqueray for GnT's. I just enjoy the flavor more. I have really been lovinig on the Corsair as a sipper with a simple squeeze of lime.

alexandergjones
05-21-2012, 17:06
picked up a bottle of bluecoat Gin from philladelphia distilling company. It made a great g&t with fevertree tonic water. Highly recommended and the bottle is beautiful.

SmoothAmbler
05-22-2012, 07:31
We have bottled the barrel aged gin. It comes out in 4-5 days. It's also a bit higher in proof (99 proof) than our Greenbrier Gin (80 proof), which I think helps quite a bit.

bigtoys
05-28-2012, 18:48
For the past few years, it's been mostly Bombay Sapphire for martinis (kept in the freezer). Also Hendricks, Tanq 10.
Occasional Northshore Distillery Gin #6 and Broker's.

Recently, I tried the Bluecoat from Philly and really liked it.
Also been drinking some Botanist from Islay.
A friend gave me a sample of Death's Door, but I haven't tried it yet.

been using St. Agur blue cheese (Whole Foods) to stuff my own olives.
Martini and Dolin dry vermouth.

Happyhour24x7
05-29-2012, 07:08
So I have now thoroughly sampled (from a martini perspective at least) the Botanist, and another gin I ordered, Martin Millers; and I can recommend both very highly if your tastes run as mine do to the more floral, less juniper heavy taste profiles.

tmckenzie
05-31-2012, 02:20
I do like a martini from time to time. I got a huge handle of Bombay Saphire gin and a 350ml of Tanquray regular. I have to say i perfer Bombay.

A lot of people i know have been trying to get me to try Hendrix, but the thought of cucumbers stops me :(


I am not a fan of eating cucumbers, but I have produced 2 different gin recipes and both have included real cucumbers, I am told hendricks uses an essence. You do not really taste cucumber in gin. It adds a coolness that seems to work best in gin and tonic.

Kalessin
05-31-2012, 13:24
I am not a fan of eating cucumbers, but I have produced 2 different gin recipes and both have included real cucumbers, I am told hendricks uses an essence. You do not really taste cucumber in gin. It adds a coolness that seems to work best in gin and tonic.

The coolness isn't too shabby in a martini either... :)

Happyhour24x7
06-08-2012, 03:01
Sampled the Smooth Ambler aged gin, with interesting results. It had a very interesting note in the nose, which I was unable to identify (yet). It really lights up the tongue, partly from alcohol, but with flavor as well. The little things that put me off the standard version are removed by the wood. It makes a pleasant, but different, sipping gin. In a martini, however, it lost something. Not bad, it just didn't work well with the vermouth. I might need to cut my ratio down and play with it. Overall, well worth picking up and checking out. Thnaks John!

bigtoys
07-02-2012, 18:52
friend returned my bottle (that I gave him with the Botanist) full of Death's Door. Recommended a G&T. Refreshing on a humid 90+ day
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/IMAG0912.jpg

Happyhour24x7
07-03-2012, 03:32
How is the Death's Door? Does it fall more towards juniper/spicy or smooth/floral?

Rutherford
07-03-2012, 08:55
It's more juniper/spicy, as it doesn't contain the floral/citrus ingredients that feature prominently in some other gins. It isn't as punch-you-in-the-face juniper-forward as some gins, but has a more subtle taste.

It isn't in the top tier of my gin hierarchy, but isn't bad. I probably won't buy another bottle given how many other better gins I've had.

kickert
07-03-2012, 09:14
If I am drinking it straight or on the rocks on a hot summer day, I really like Millers. It is clean and crisp with a great cool mouth feel. I also like Hendricks. If I am going to reach for anything, it is generally corsair gin, but as you could imagine, I am a bit partial. I think Bluecoat and Citadel are more marketing than taste. I think Rouge Gin is the worst stuff I have ever tasted.

Happyhour24x7
07-03-2012, 12:03
yeah, I've been enjoying Miller's in my martinis lately as well...that is a nice smooth gin. It's been awhile since I've tried the Corsair, I'll have to give it another whirl.

Rutherford
07-03-2012, 13:14
I'd third the Miller's recommendation -- my personal favorite for gin-related uses. I'll have to try the Corsair's sometime, but need to reduce my gin collection 4-5 bottles by attrition first.

Happyhour24x7
07-24-2012, 03:21
Stopped into a liquor store downtown over the weekend, and they had just received a new gin out of New York, called Comb 9; it is apparently distiller from honey. It makes a pretty good martini, I was concerned there would be some sweetness given the source, but ther wasn't. Definitely worth a try. I'll try for more detailed tasting soon.

Gillman
07-31-2012, 16:24
I drink gin perhaps two or three times a year. This hot summer seems to suit it. I made my own blend of gins, poured over rocks, added bitters and some water.

It's really good and it reminds me that the old Victorian standby of gin-and-water had an inherent logic.

Gary

Jono
08-07-2012, 08:46
http://www.whiskyreviews.blogspot.com/ A nice couple of reviews by Ralfy. Since I really don't like the strong juniper taste in most gins, he notes that regular Bombay Dry gin is
without that strong note and is more orange and fruit notes.....it might be one for me to consider. It seemed to very easy on his palate to drink neat. Hendricks as well....

smokinjoe
08-07-2012, 09:41
http://www.whiskyreviews.blogspot.com/ A nice couple of reviews by Ralfy. Since I really don't like the strong juniper taste in most gins, he notes that regular Bombay Dry gin is
without that strong note and is more orange and fruit notes.....it might be one for me to consider. It seemed to very easy on his palate to drink neat. Hendricks as well....

Jon, if you're looking for something that's not as junipery, Corsair's might be right up your alley. It's more vegetal, than junipery. Very drinkable with a squeeze of lime, or just plain.

Jono
08-07-2012, 11:13
Thanks for the recommendation Joe. So far, gin has remained the on spirit I have yet to really embrace.

smokinjoe
08-31-2012, 15:29
Just picked up and sampled the Leopold's gin today. Nice drink. Where many gins have a very pronounced, sharp, and "glossy" flavor profile, this is less so. Not "muted", as in faint, as the flavors are there. But rather, "matte", as compared to "glossy". I know that makes no sense at all, but it's all I can come up with. :D There is this Necco wafer flavor thing going on, but as yet, I can't ID which color. Maybe, I should go buy a pack. Anywho, it all adds up to a very nice gin, that I am really enjoying.

Happyhour24x7
09-28-2012, 03:35
Made a martini with my new bottle of Bulldog gin, and quite enjoyed it. Complex without anything overpowering. Smooth, tasty gin. Get some.

Trey Manthey
10-05-2012, 13:08
I keep a few bottles of nice gin around. My favorite for the last years is Martin Miller's 90 proof Westbourne. I've also got bottles of Voyager and Plymouth Navy Strength.

Finally, I've got a handle of Gordon's for those who don't give a crap.

Gillman
11-12-2012, 15:29
If I had to choose one brand, it is Beefeater. I grew up with it and for me it defines London Dry.

However, I like (who knew?) to blend my own and currently in the glass is a blend of Gordon's (about 50%), Beefeater Orange, regular Beefeater, a craft Old Tom gin from Oregon, and three vodkas (Grey Goose, a Polish brand and Stoli). The craft gin had a ton of juniper, the Beefeater Orange was sweet, the Gordon's dry/junipery and correct, the vodkas tasty (for vodka) and neutral, to blend and display the assertive flavours of the others.

It's all a big dryish gin taste with notes of orange, juniper, sweetness and a tangy dryness.

Very nice drink, I like it without ice on its own, just a skosh after a beer.

Gary

unclebunk
11-12-2012, 17:04
I know I've posted this before at some point, but my wife is English and her family drinks Boodles exclusively. It was reportedly Winston Churchill's brand of choice and he knew a thing or two about drinking, so I'm good with Boodles as my go-to gin when I'm making g&t's.

MyOldKyDram
11-12-2012, 17:11
Grabbed a St. George gin sampler the other day. Have tried the dry rye and the botanivore. The botanivore made an exceptional g&t, and the dry rye made a very interesting negroni. Haven't gotten around to the terroir yet, but looking forward to it.

mopgcw
11-17-2012, 20:03
Grabbed a St. George gin sampler the other day. Have tried the dry rye and the botanivore. The botanivore made an exceptional g&t, and the dry rye made a very interesting negroni. Haven't gotten around to the terroir yet, but looking forward to it.

i love the st. george's. nice stuff. love their absinthe too.

ever try an old tom gin from ransom? very nice to sip neat. very different.

MyOldKyDram
11-17-2012, 20:11
We have some of that. Did not care for it initially and haven't gone back to it since. Been about a year ago. Will have to break it back put and give her another go.

mopgcw
11-17-2012, 20:45
We have some of that. Did not care for it initially and haven't gone back to it since. Been about a year ago. Will have to break it back put and give her another go.

it did take me a bit to come around on it too. very, very different for sure.

tanstaafl2
11-18-2012, 05:30
i love the st. george's. nice stuff. love their absinthe too.

ever try an old tom gin from ransom? very nice to sip neat. very different.

Yes, much more like a whiskey than a typical gin. Ransom also makes a very nice Martinez with Carpano, maraschino liqueur and a dash of Boker's bitters!

squire
11-26-2012, 22:58
After a few decades of dedicated research I have concluded if I can only have one gin in my cabinet it will be Plymouth.

CoMobourbon
03-24-2013, 13:32
My friend, whom I have been educating on bourbon for the last few months, suddenly revealed that he is a minor gin guy and gave me a gin 101 lesson. He lined up some basics - New Amsterdam, Tanqueray London Dry, Tanqueray Rangpur, and Bombay Sapphire, and we tried them neat and with diet tonic water.

Suffice to say, I was impressed with all of them. With tonic water, I like the Rangpur, and neat I liked the Bombay Sapphire - but the sub-$15 New Amsterdam was simple and good too, especially for the price. Price and taste taken together, I think I might have to take up gin as a second liquor of interest.

You guys see this question with whisk(e)y all the time: What commonly available gin recommendations to you have for a new gin drinker trying to cheaply but effectively expand his range?

tanstaafl2
03-24-2013, 13:53
To fully appreciate gin I think it is worth including both Plymouth and Old Tom gin in your exploration. There is only one "true" Plymouth gin called Plymouth gin naturally enough! So that is easy.

There are two fairly regularly available old Tom gins but they are fairly different. Hayman's Old Tom is more the classic version. Ransom Old Tom is a delightful malty Old Tom style and a wonderful spirit made in Oregon (they also now make a young straight bourbon which I haven't tried but probably deserves a taste at least).

Ransom gin also serves as a lovely introduction to the world of genever/jenever, the Dutch big brother of more traditional London style gins like Tanqueray, Bombay and even the California based New Amsterdam. Without at least trying jenever I don't think you can have a really complete gin experience. Bols is the biggest name and a good place to start but there are others worth checking out as well, including Genevieve, a pot stilled spirit of wheat, barley and rye mash, from Anchor in San Francisco.

Yes, it can be as addictive as bourbon...

Alden
03-24-2013, 14:12
Bombay Blue, dry Vermouth, a little lime juice, shaken with ice, and two or three garlic stuffed queen olives.

There are damn few drinks better than that.

squire
03-24-2013, 14:13
Don't overlook Beefeaters which is a classic for a reason.

CoMobourbon
03-24-2013, 15:14
Wow, thanks for the quick responses guys!

I will try be sure to try
-Beefeaters (pretty cheap and available around me)
-martinis and close variants (that pretty much what you were describing, right Alden?)
-a genever/jenever

(At $32+, Plymouth seems a little too expensive for a new cheap gin drinker like me, but thanks a lot for the reference nonetheless. My friend's birthday is coming up.)

Alden
03-24-2013, 15:45
Wow, thanks for the quick responses guys!

I will try be sure to try
-Beefeaters (pretty cheap and available around me)
-martinis and close variants (that pretty much what you were describing, right Alden?)
-a genever/jenever

(At $32+, Plymouth seems a little too expensive for a new cheap gin drinker like me, but thanks a lot for the reference nonetheless. My friend's birthday is coming up.)

Yes, I was describing a martini. Gin is a completely different experience than bourbon. Enjoy!

squire
03-25-2013, 12:19
A well crafted gin (not just flavored GNS) is a very sophisticated liquor.

Trey Manthey
03-25-2013, 12:58
I've got a collection going:

- Martin Miller's
- Martin Miller's Westbourne (my favorite)
- Hendrick's
- Plymouth
- Plymouth Navy Strength
- Ransom Old Tom
- Junipero
- Beefeaters
- The Botanist
- Voyager
- Gordon's

This is just from memory, might be missing some.

bigtoys
10-09-2013, 20:51
first martinis of the fall
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/IMG_20131008_180541_784-1_zps572c027b.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/IMG_20131008_180541_784-1_zps572c027b.jpg.html)http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/IMG_20131009_190637_009-1_zps3e97334f.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/IMG_20131009_190637_009-1_zps3e97334f.jpg.html)

homemade blue cheese stuffed olives--yes, I know, it borders on being an hors d'oeuvre
both Bombay Sapphire, Dolin dry vermouth. #2 dirty.
Gonna try one with The Botanist soon

Trey Manthey
10-10-2013, 21:27
St George Dry Rye Gin...don't think I can recommend this for anything.

tanstaafl2
10-11-2013, 07:09
St George Dry Rye Gin...don't think I can recommend this for anything.

I think it works well as an interesting substitute for jenever in cocktails. But then you have to like the malty jenever style as it is not a classic gin by any means.

Also I think it makes a pretty good Pink Gin although that is not a drink for everybody. Even a martini if a bit different (and I tend to use a pretty healthy 3:1ish vermouth ratio and include the classic addition of orange bitters in mine. Even works in a Negroni although that is not a favorite drink of mine.

Doesn't play as well with citrus although it can in the right cocktail.

Gillman
10-27-2013, 18:51
Sipsmith, a new London artisan gin. It is slightly sweet with excellent aromatics and taste, I think orange of some kind is a defining flavour or at least working closely with the indispensable juniper. Funny thing is, it reminds me very much of my current personal gin blend, comprised of about 15 gins and a genever or two. I think many people couldn't tell them apart blind.

I like the Sipsmsith much better than another new London brand stored a very short time in scotch whisky casks. Can't recall the name for now. Decent gin but the Sipsmith shows much more form and depth IMO.

Gary

Photodudems
12-30-2013, 09:11
I just picked up a Bottle of Bulldog Gin today. It is very good, and I'm surprised I like it. Gin isn't really my usual, but this is very nice, and moderately priced.

Jackinbox
01-07-2014, 20:47
I don't believe I've ever had a gin & tonic before (unless it was at a party in my early 20s), so I thought I might try one. My neighbor has a bottle of Gordon's and a bottle of Bombay Sapphire on hand but he drinks his with 7UP, so I'll need to pick up tonic water. Are all tonic waters pretty much the same or should I look for something specific?

tanstaafl2
01-07-2014, 21:04
I don't believe I've ever had a gin & tonic before (unless it was at a party in my early 20s), so I thought I might try one. My neighbor has a bottle of Gordon's and a bottle of Bombay Sapphire on hand but he drinks his with 7UP, so I'll need to pick up tonic water. Are all tonic waters pretty much the same or should I look for something specific?

Some will say any old tonic will do but others feel there are significant differences. At home I have used Fever Tree, both the Indian and when I can find it the Mediterranean style, to good success based on the results of this taste test (http://www.cocktailians.com/2012/08/tonic-water-shootout-part-1-the-contenders.html) from 2012.

Among the less expensive typical brands I find Canada Dry works well although it is much less "tonic-y" and more like club soda to me with a more mild flavor. It might be a good choice if you are using a particularly flavorful or delicate gin where you want the gin to stand out. Hendricks for example.

G&T is not typically considered a cold weather cocktail unless you are just trying to convince yourself it is summer!

squire
01-08-2014, 10:59
For me the flavor profile of the Gin counts more than the brand of tonic. Gordons has a fuller style that mixes well with the standard tonic brands so I would get the one on sale. Add a quarter of fresh lime and you'll be transported to the beach no matter how hard the wind howls.

Jackinbox
01-08-2014, 20:59
Thanks for the info everyone. I've been reading about this Rangpur style. Is that worth trying in a gin & tonic or should I just stick with the London?

squire
01-09-2014, 03:26
Certainly worth trying though being mindful Rangpour is basically lime flavored gin with a dash of ginger. These flavored gins are typically lower proof as well so I would buy the regular strength stuff then add my own ginger ale and lime.

Gilbeys had a lime flavor gin back in the late 60s that I used to buy for a girlfriend until I learned to fix my own. If I were trying to impress a young lady today I'd buy the Tanqueray version.

tanstaafl2
01-09-2014, 08:54
Thanks for the info everyone. I've been reading about this Rangpur style. Is that worth trying in a gin & tonic or should I just stick with the London?

I like Tanq in general and think both Rangpur and Malacca are interesting less dry gins. Malacca is 80 pf I think while Rangpur is the same as standard Tanq. Rangpur is more lime flavor but still different with some more herbal notes than the Tanq 10 which is also citrus-y. Malacca is also citrus-y but not so much lime.

Both Malacca and Rangpur work well as a variation in lighter gin based cocktails like G&T but tend to get lost in a cocktail with heavier ingredients to me.

And if you want some added lime through it in there! And maybe a dash of bitters? What the heck, go for it!

squire
01-09-2014, 11:06
I believe Rangpur comes in three strengths, 80, 86.2 and 94.6. The only one I've seen is the 80.

tanstaafl2
01-09-2014, 11:34
I believe Rangpur comes in three strengths, 80, 86.2 and 94.6. The only one I've seen is the 80.

Those are the proofs for the standard Tanqueray in different locations I believe.

Only Rangpur I have seen is the 82.4 proof which is the one I have. But certainly could be others. I have had it awhile so perhaps the proof has been cut to 80. The standard Tanq is usually 94.6 in the US so I suppose there could be a Rangpur at this strength too but I've never seen it.

I will have to check the shelf the next time I am out to satisfy my curiosity!

squire
01-09-2014, 11:42
Come to think of it the one I'm referring to probably was 82.4, didn't give it much thought at the time, just seem to remember thinking another watered down flavored thing.

I usually buy Beefeaters but don't really have any brand loyalty when it comes to gin. I did quit buying Bombay though when they dropped the proof from 94 to 86.

bigtoys
01-28-2014, 16:06
first one of these in a while. Bombay Sapphire Dirty Martini. Dolin Dry Vermouth. Dirty Sue Olive Juice. stuffed the olives with Castello Rosenborg Danish Blue Cheese (not the softest cheese, but easily doable). I know, it borders on being an hors d'oeuvre.
The gin was in the fridge in the garage where it's about 20 degrees (F). Nice ice shards floating on the martini.
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/b401b1a6-e84e-449f-bb6a-f2bd6097696f_zpse9d1a912.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/b401b1a6-e84e-449f-bb6a-f2bd6097696f_zpse9d1a912.jpg.html)

had to refill the bottle from the big one in the bunker
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/c4b76ded-c442-428a-9451-020248f8cd54_zps9ee148a7.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/c4b76ded-c442-428a-9451-020248f8cd54_zps9ee148a7.jpg.html)

tanstaafl2
01-31-2014, 13:06
Had a sample of a new to me gin yesterday. Called Bummers & Lazarus. Made in San Francico on Treasue Island it appears out of grapes (essentially a brandy base that is then redistilled with the botanicals). Not sure what the botanical formula is but juniper is definitely not the primary flavoring. Reallly unusual flavor, maybe a bit like Hendricks but not really like anything I have had before. I suppose given the lack of readily apparent juniper influence this was almost a botanical vodka. But that is pretty much what gin is anyway!

17663

squire
01-31-2014, 14:47
Juniper is the defining characteristic of gin and lacking that it is just flavored vodka. This one appears as though they thunk up the label first and made something to fill the bottle later. That or they just don't know how to make gin, sometimes the term craft distiller refers to marketing acumen rather than distilling skill.

tanstaafl2
01-31-2014, 15:14
Juniper is the defining characteristic of gin and lacking that it is just flavored vodka. This one appears as though they thunk up the label first and made something to fill the bottle later. That or they just don't know how to make gin, sometimes the term craft distiller refers to marketing acumen rather than distilling skill.

Juniper is in it but it is by no means dominant. That is getting to be more comon these days with some of the "Western" style gins. The grape base reminds me of G'Vine gin from France which is another grape based gin. From pictures I can find they do indeed distill their own product and the website even has some talk of making a bourbon. They even sorta say the right things.

http://www.raffdistillerie.com/bourbon.html

In any case it was an interesting gin/botanical vodka/what ever you want to call it.

squire
01-31-2014, 16:30
I think there's a small movement among the micros to get around the tasteless, odorless, colorless requirements of vodka by instead making a gin that's not so gin.

Harry in WashDC
02-01-2014, 06:44
I'm not sure I should be touting a non-bourbon blog on SB, but I've been reading gin reviews at theginisin.com for a couple years now. While I drink bourbons year round, my wife likes gin drinks in the summer. We got tired of basic London drys and have added in genevers, Plymouth, and Old Tom - still drink the London drys but not so much. theginisin reference is here because it recently mentioned how some aged gins are taking on a brown color, and how some craft gins are experimenting with different flavors, some of which approach whiskey profiles. F'rinstance, GreenHat gin here in WashDC has "seasonal" releases that match botanicals to the weather, sort of. In no way will it be mistaken for Gilbeys but I find it an interesting break from bourbon. Another info source: the book The Drunken Botanist is all about how distilled spirits including whiskeys are made and flavored. It gave me a better appreciation of the art and science behind my favorite spirits which is one reason I ended up at SB - so much to absorb from you all. As a bourbon lover, I like the move by craft distillers to experimenting with their products until their whiskeys are properly aged. If they take care of their gins, I expect they'll take care of their whiskeys.

HighInTheMtns
02-01-2014, 12:43
Juniper is the defining characteristic of gin and lacking that it is just flavored vodka. This one appears as though they thunk up the label first and made something to fill the bottle later. That or they just don't know how to make gin, sometimes the term craft distiller refers to marketing acumen rather than distilling skill.
I'd say this is somewhat distinct from flavored vodka; presumably they're using botanicals in a gin basket in the still and not just adding flavor to vodka.

squire
02-01-2014, 14:30
Of course Jim but isn't running base spirit vapor through a botanical basket essentially flavoring vodka? What I'm talking about is producing a near gin that could have a wider use in cocktails than a traditional gin.

garbanzobean
02-10-2014, 21:55
So I just sort of stumbled in here while drinking a gin and tonic, figured I'd add my input. While I do not drink gin neat, I do have a weakness for two gin-based cocktails: Gin & Tonic and Tom Collins. Sure, I experiment with other gin-based cocktails from time to time, but those are the two that I come back to, time and again. Primarily the Gin and Tonic. I haven't really nailed down a great Tom Collins recipe yet, but I do have a couple standby recipes for G&T. The first uses 1 oz Jack Rudy Tonic Syrup, 2 oz Gin, and 4 oz club soda. This works when I'm the mood for a mild G&T, or when I'm not pissed off by the fact that the creator of Jack Rudy Cocktail Co. is a huge d-bag. I should know, I've known for nearly 20 years. If I want a more bitter G&T, I usually use 4oz of Fentiman's tonic water + .25 oz Jack Rudy along with my 2 oz of gin.

Speaking of gin, I have not tried a ton: Tanqueray regular and Malacca, Bombay Sapphire, The Botanist Islay Dry Gin, and Citadelle. So far Citadelle is my favorite at any price, and the price also makes it my value pick.

tanstaafl2
02-11-2014, 06:22
So I just sort of stumbled in here while drinking a gin and tonic, figured I'd add my input. While I do not drink gin neat, I do have a weakness for two gin-based cocktails: Gin & Tonic and Tom Collins. Sure, I experiment with other gin-based cocktails from time to time, but those are the two that I come back to, time and again. Primarily the Gin and Tonic. I haven't really nailed down a great Tom Collins recipe yet, but I do have a couple standby recipes for G&T. The first uses 1 oz Jack Rudy Tonic Syrup, 2 oz Gin, and 4 oz club soda. This works when I'm the mood for a mild G&T, or when I'm not pissed off by the fact that the creator of Jack Rudy Cocktail Co. is a huge d-bag. I should know, I've known for nearly 20 years. If I want a more bitter G&T, I usually use 4oz of Fentiman's tonic water + .25 oz Jack Rudy along with my 2 oz of gin.

Speaking of gin, I have not tried a ton: Tanqueray regular and Malacca, Bombay Sapphire, The Botanist Islay Dry Gin, and Citadelle. So far Citadelle is my favorite at any price, and the price also makes it my value pick.

If you are of an "adventurous" nature :cool: then you might want to consider trying genever to make an "original" Tom Collins!

http://cocktailvirgin.blogspot.com/2009/08/original-collins.html

Geoff at Drink Spirits also wrote about it.

http://www.drinkspirits.com/genever/exploring-genever-bols-genever/

I rather prefer them to the typical Tom Collins. I suggest starting with Bols genever which is generally pretty available and I think quite good.

Harry in WashDC
02-11-2014, 21:11
If you are of an "adventurous" nature :cool: then you might want to consider trying genever to make an "original" Tom Collins!

http://cocktailvirgin.blogspot.com/2009/08/original-collins.html

Geoff at Drink Spirits also wrote about it.

http://www.drinkspirits.com/genever/exploring-genever-bols-genever/

I rather prefer them to the typical Tom Collins. I suggest starting with Bols genever which is generally pretty available and I think quite good.

Oh, yeah. I'll concur. That Drink Spirits recipe is wonderful. As an alternative to the Bols genever, we have used the Bols Damrak when we get Meyer lemons. Oooh, I'm looking forward to Summer already. For sparkling water, we use Apollinaris or Poland Springs or Fever Tree in that order.

Vietish
02-17-2014, 01:41
Just had the pleasure to open and taste a brand new bottle of Gin that I helped fund.

Four Pillars.

WOW. It will need further tasting, but so far, it will be right up there with the best Gin I have ever tasted. That its locally produced and that they guys who make it are passionate and more than willing to have a chat about it is even better.

squire
02-17-2014, 06:54
That sounds encouraging, what is the bottling proof?

Vietish
02-17-2014, 15:32
I think its around 80 something. But I would need to check when I get home.

s8ist
03-05-2014, 15:11
Gotta join this thread. Next to whiskey, gin is my go-to, with a gin and tonic being my staple drink.

My preference is on the dry side, but not too dry. I like a good amount of juniper, but I like variations that have merit.

My current favorite gin is Uncle Val's Lot #15. Has anybody else tried it?

Other great gins I've had are, The Botanist, Junipero, St. George Terroir, Magellan (blue iris gin), Corsair

As for tonic, my current favorite is Q Tonic, followed by Whole Foods 365 brand.

Andre28
04-16-2014, 15:51
Have been having a few Gin and Tonics lately. I am in Australia, and there is great small batch maker called Four Pillars. Highly recommend it if you get the chance to try it.

Grain Belt
04-16-2014, 20:18
I know two things about gin, Jack and Squat. That being said, here in Minnesota we have a line of vodka and gin produced with local organic grain called Prairie Organic. I made my wife a few dirty martinis last night with the gin and it was pretty nice.

The Black Tot
04-25-2014, 03:55
Gotta join this thread. Next to whiskey, gin is my go-to, with a gin and tonic being my staple drink.

My preference is on the dry side, but not too dry. I like a good amount of juniper, but I like variations that have merit.

My current favorite gin is Uncle Val's Lot #15. Has anybody else tried it?

Other great gins I've had are, The Botanist, Junipero, St. George Terroir, Magellan (blue iris gin), Corsair

As for tonic, my current favorite is Q Tonic, followed by Whole Foods 365 brand.

I have tried the Uncle Val's, and at present it's my favorite, too!

I haven't gone whole hog with gin investigations yet, but UV's was a huge step up from Hendricks

tbt

squire
04-25-2014, 11:45
Not a fan of Hendricks myself. Nothing wrong with it except the proof, but of course there are a lot of them in that 80ish bracket now. When it comes to gin I draw the line at 94 proof.

The Black Tot
05-19-2014, 21:22
Not a fan of Hendricks myself. Nothing wrong with it except the proof, but of course there are a lot of them in that 80ish bracket now. When it comes to gin I draw the line at 94 proof.

I'll keep more of an eye on the proof as I experiment with gins going forward...

tbt

Harry in WashDC
05-19-2014, 22:08
Not a fan of Hendricks myself. Nothing wrong with it except the proof, but of course there are a lot of them in that 80ish bracket now. When it comes to gin I draw the line at 94 proof.
Bombay Sapphire? I keep it around for emergencies, like when I want gin.

Hendricks works well in a cocktail with parsley. Don't laugh. As I posted elsewhere on SB, after eating roasted garlic at the bar, the bartender passed around bunches of parsley he'd filched from the kitchen - good breath/pallet cleanser. We had some left over. Put some in a shaker, bruised it, added Hendricks & some lemon (not too much) & simple syrup (not too much). Stirred with ice. Served it up with a few bits of parsley floating around. Was better than having Chef yell at us for wasting his parsley. Turned out pretty good.

Happyhour24x7
05-20-2014, 03:27
I'd be interested in knowing what bar you were at, Harry. Sounds like a good bartender.

dean_martin
05-25-2014, 09:29
Picked up a bottle of Blue Coat in Philly. Waiting on my flight home and hoping my bottle survives in checked luggage.

Tucker
05-25-2014, 16:40
Picked up a bottle of Blue Coat in Philly. Waiting on my flight home and hoping my bottle survives in checked luggage.

Bluecoat is very good, a traditional dry gin with a nice balance of juniper and citrus (maybe heavier on the citrus). Not lacking in proof. I'm sure you'll enjoy it.

dean_martin
05-25-2014, 20:27
Bluecoat is very good, a traditional dry gin with a nice balance of juniper and citrus (maybe heavier on the citrus). Not lacking in proof. I'm sure you'll enjoy it.

I enjoyed a Bluecoat Martini at the bar in Capitol Grille my 3rd night in Philly. I decided to take some of that native spirit home with me. I got a TSA inspection notice in my bag, but no worries. The bottle made it home.

Harry in WashDC
05-26-2014, 05:58
I'd be interested in knowing what bar you were at, Harry. Sounds like a good bartender.
Buck's Fishing @ Camping, Connecticut Ave NW. Jason made it for us (well, we helped), but don't let Chef know we use the parsley in drinks; kitchen'll want a cut. :shocked:

Oh, yeah, in my post above, it should be "palate" not "pallet". We don't clean pallets at the bar.

r.mx
07-04-2014, 12:49
Have any of you guys tried the Monkey 47? I picked up a bottle recently after it was much hyped at my local store, and it did not disappoint. It's pretty hard to describe in it's entirety, but I will say it's the only gin that I've picked up jasmine, citrus, juniper, dried berries, bay leaf and lemon zest, all in the same sip. I'll let the professionals do the talking, but I'd highly recommend picking up a bottle if you haven't already. Check this out : http://spiritsjournal.klwines.com/klwinescom-spirits-blog/2014/5/6/this-monkeys-gone-to-heaven.html

Happyhour24x7
07-08-2014, 03:14
Very much enjoying the bottle of Leopold Bros. Navy Strength I picked up. Makes a hell of a martini.

Harry in WashDC
07-08-2014, 15:35
Thanks, Happy. I looked right at it and passed even though I like Leopold Bros. products. I will not do that again.

The Black Tot
08-10-2014, 15:23
A few weeks ago I stumbled across a few dusty bottles of Leyden's gin and an older label Plymouth gin.

From what I could gather on the internet, this stuff is a Dutch gin that came over to the US in the late 90's, and has since been re-branded Van Gogh gin. I later saw a Van Gogh gin at another store across town, but did not buy it.

The Leyden's tastes awesome. I could enjoy it neat. So I'm going to try a Van Gogh soon to see if it is truly the same stuff.

Since I last wrote in this forum I also tried Mayfair, with which I was not impressed, and The Botanist, which I do enjoy.

I have the feeling that Van Gogh may be my new gin of choice. I'll know more in the fall when I get back on land and do some more sipping.

tbt

bigtoys
09-11-2014, 17:06
got the martini itch and we had some St. Agur Blue Cheese in the fridge.
figured I'd try a new gin: St. George
Dirty Sue olive juice was made popular on Sex in the City

the gin is pretty good, btw!


give the cheese time to warm up and pull the pimentos


http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/0eda1cf7-f479-49db-89a3-0ba982dad6b2_zpsa7b1d9d2.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/0eda1cf7-f479-49db-89a3-0ba982dad6b2_zpsa7b1d9d2.jpg.html)




chill the shaker and glass. beaker for measuring like Walter White


http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/3258199f-b6e8-4c48-a6ad-01bffcab1752_zpsbff9a3b9.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/3258199f-b6e8-4c48-a6ad-01bffcab1752_zpsbff9a3b9.jpg.html)


get dirty stuffing the olives


http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/9562dc61-b002-4314-9237-44820a1473c5_zps131b4e50.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/9562dc61-b002-4314-9237-44820a1473c5_zps131b4e50.jpg.html)


loaded and ready to go


http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/d2b16822-7b24-4f53-ae9f-f0da6f0d8628_zps08bff8c9.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/d2b16822-7b24-4f53-ae9f-f0da6f0d8628_zps08bff8c9.jpg.html)


liquid ingredients


http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/11a236ad-763d-4dc3-bc3d-f4c847b5104e_zps70f1c389.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/11a236ad-763d-4dc3-bc3d-f4c847b5104e_zps70f1c389.jpg.html)http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/fda8732e-86fd-4b55-83c0-e6051232ba0e_zpsd5ea6d86.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/fda8732e-86fd-4b55-83c0-e6051232ba0e_zpsd5ea6d86.jpg.html)


cheers!!


http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/8709324a-b9b2-4ddf-8f53-bc09b978ea03_zpsddcadc3f.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/8709324a-b9b2-4ddf-8f53-bc09b978ea03_zpsddcadc3f.jpg.html)

s8ist
09-16-2014, 00:00
Have any of you guys tried the Monkey 47? Check this out : http://spiritsjournal.klwines.com/klwinescom-spirits-blog/2014/5/6/this-monkeys-gone-to-heaven.html

I just picked up a bottle this past weekend on the rave review of the owner of the shop.

I agree, it's fantastic stuff.

Made a G&T this evening with Val's Batch 22 (every bit as good as Batch 15) and then made another with Monkey. Monkey wins hands down. Probably the best G&T I've ever had!

Definitely going to have to pick up more of this stuff.

soonami
09-16-2014, 12:42
Anyone try Tanqueray Old Tom? I bought a bottle, but have a couple gins already open, so I'll save this one for when I'm down another. Thoughts? How similiar is to Malacca if you've had both

kickert
09-21-2014, 02:09
We had a visitor bring some Bluecoat Gin as a gift (he is from PA). It was much more vegetal than I remember it, but was a good change of pace from what I have been drinking lately.

Harry in WashDC
09-25-2014, 21:11
A recent bourbon thread featured Henry du Yore whiskey. Turns out Ransom Spirits, Sheridan, Oregon, makes it. Ransom is more famous for its gins. Last night, because that thread piqued my interest, I ordered a Fitty-Fitty - one oz. Ransom Dry Gin and 1 oz. Ransom Dry Vermouth, some orange bitters and a lemon twist. I knew they made good gin. Now, I know they make good vermouth.

Happyhour24x7
09-26-2014, 03:39
Harry, you need to give us locals the heads up on which bars have these good cocktails you have.