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MOUNTBALDY
05-25-2012, 15:09
Hi all,

I'm new to StraightBourbon.com. I am in the process of assisting a friend opening up a distillery here in Montana. He will be producing rum and bourbon. The rum we have perfected very nicely. The bourbon needs work. Our latest test batch has a grain bill was too high on the malt. It had a very Scotch like flavor. The newest test batch will be more like the grain bill Basil Hayden uses. I have some experience tasting many fine single barreled vintage bourbons but am seeking advice as to what folks prefer.

What do you prefer?
Does price dictate quality?
What makes that bourbon special? (Is it a specific wood that it's aged in? Is it made with more rye or wheat than the other? Why do you like it?)

Any advice is greatly appreciated. We are hoping to open the doors up in another 6 - 12 months. Once it's a go, I'll certainly let folks know.

Cheers,

Joseph Gill

sutton
05-25-2012, 16:02
Well ... you're in for quite a bit of advice, I'd think :grin: - not sure how it is going to converge! Taste preferences are as varied as bourbons on the market ...

Whatever you decide to do, for me, the best bourbons (or any spirit) stay balanced, so nothing sticks out. There are many styles that will fit different circumstances/moods, etc. Are you targeting a particular market segment (premium/specialty, everyday bourbon, both?)

Phil T
05-25-2012, 16:32
Hi Joseph, and welcome to the site. I'm sorry if you find this a bit rude, but it is what it is. There is a ton of info available here, about every question that you asked. The search function is your friend. If you and your friend are serious about a quality bourbon, spend the time researching this site from top to bottom, don't take the easy way out, which I think you are doing by your post...

ILLfarmboy
05-25-2012, 17:51
The best advice dosn't center around taste profiles and mashbills.

Low proof off the still

low barrel entry proof

And 94 -100+ bottling proof.

What we don't want is another micro that came off the still tasting more like GNS than white dog that was minimaly aged and bottled at 80.

luther.r
05-25-2012, 18:29
The best advice dosn't center around taste profiles and mashbills.

Low proof off the still

low barrel entry proof

And 94 -100+ bottling proof.

What we don't want is another micro that came off the still tasting more like GNS than white dog that was minimaly aged and bottled at 80.

+1

And whether or not you have to start selling 2-year aged whiskey from the start, start aging some older stuff from the get-go. 6-year, 10-year, 12-year, etc. And use 53 gallon barrels.

dmarkle
05-25-2012, 18:51
What do you prefer?
Delicious bourbon at a cheap price.

Does price dictate quality?
Not necessarily, but the age of the spirit weighs on the price.

What makes that bourbon special? (Is it a specific wood that it's aged in? Is it made with more rye or wheat than the other? Why do you like it?)
This is different for each drinker. I highly recommend getting an idea and a taste for what you like in bourbon and going for that. IMO if you're at this small of a scale, making bourbon for what you think someone else will like is going to be problematic. Drink up. Read the forums and formulate your own opinion. Develop your palate and determine what it is you want to contribute to the variety out there. If you really want to analyze the components of what creates flavor profiles, then maybe you're an ideal customer for BT's Single Oak Project (http://www.singleoakproject.com/). You'll at least be able to write off your bottles on your tax return...

If you're asking if there's a hole in the market somewhere for bourbons, IMO the answer to that is yes, but in order to fill it, you're going to have to make some incredible whiskey and sit on it for 12 years :)

Bourbon Boiler
05-25-2012, 18:57
Small barrels don't make for faster aging, it makes for different aging. Don't take the bait. You won't be able to comete on price, so make a different product. I wish more micros would make whiskeys, so they'd have more freedom to make a product that has a more distinct taste.

Young Blacksmith
05-25-2012, 19:59
There are tons of start ups using small barrels and aging for anywhere from months to a few years. If you want to differentiate yourself, use the advice given above about large barrels, proofs, and just as important for good bourbon, time.

Me personally, I prefer high rye mashbills. Aged for anywhere from 6-15 years in large barrels. All bourbon is aged in new charred white oak barrels, so wood choice is pretty easy.

And price does not dictate quality. I have paid $30 for a 3 month old baby bourbon 375ml that is crap. I have also paid $20 for a liter of great bourbon.

wadewood
05-25-2012, 20:39
1st time poster; restrain yourself.....troll

Restaurant man
05-26-2012, 01:24
Go to Kentucky. Find a nice hillside & buy 5 acres. Brew ur bourbon as best you can. Sit by the fire and wait 6-8 years. Bottle and enjoy. :cool: Then share with friends and watch the fever spread! Congratulations you are an instant bourbon millionaire!

TrickNick
05-26-2012, 13:59
1st time poster; restrain yourself.....troll

+1. Damn first time posters.

Bourbon Boiler
05-26-2012, 17:09
+1. Damn first time posters.

well played, sir.

ebo
05-27-2012, 06:47
+1. Damn first time posters.
:lol:
.....................

bgageus
06-05-2012, 12:57
At a profit if we can, at a loss if we must, but always Fine Bourbon.

If I were to start distilling, I would first concentrate on the quality of your grains, not taking lightly the effect of terroir. I know most Kentcuky Bourbon uses Indiana corn, I would start there. Not sure where the rye and and malt usually come from.

I would try out locally grown grains to see what impacts the agriculture has on your grains, maybe MT doesn't have good Bourbon Corn, but maybe it has good rye like PA once did. I would much rather be prone to buy a product that uses Locally grown MT grain than one that tried to duplicate a recipe that is not natural to the local.

A quick google search tells me MT has Barley and Wheat locally grown, maybe focus on a single malt product, maybe not, its your still, but there are only a few (5 or so) Domestic producers of single malt whiskey. Sure you are not going to compete with Scotch, but you shouldn't be trying to.

timd
06-05-2012, 14:10
Go to Kentucky. Find a nice hillside & buy 5 acres. Brew ur bourbon as best you can. Sit by the fire and wait 6-8 years. Bottle and enjoy. :cool: Then share with friends and watch the fever spread! Congratulations you are an instant bourbon millionaire!

Best way to make a small fortune with Bourbon? Start with a large fortune...

Ejmharris
06-05-2012, 14:33
Best way to make a small fortune with Bourbon? Start with a large fortune...

Haha, this actually made me laugh out loud while waiting to get my hair cut. I work in the aviation industry and have heard the same rule applied.

p_elliott
06-06-2012, 09:26
Best way to make a small fortune with Bourbon? Start with a large fortune...

I'm sure there are some old families in KY that can attest to that.