PDA

View Full Version : What are you cookin on the smoker?



cigarnv
06-12-2012, 03:00
Given that we are in BBQ season I thought it would be fun to see what everyone has coming off their smokers..... pictures always are appreciated....

This past weekend a few buddies and I cooked at an event called DizzyFest in Virgina ... an EggFest put on by Dizzy Pig BBQ. It was a great time with 300+ folks in attendance. We made several things but the hit of the day was a 25 pound beef shoulder smoked up on the BGE at 225F for 24 hours. I injected it, rubbed it up with Dizzy Pig Cow lick and foiled at 152F and pulled it at 195F. After we rested it for about 5 hours in a Cambro we pulled the beef directly off the cooked shoulder, dipped it in the pan juices and put it on a bun with some horseradish sauce..... good eating!!!

So what's cooking on your smoker?

wmpevans
06-12-2012, 05:57
After gettin a BBQ education at the Sampler Took the plunge and bought a Weber Smokey Mtn smoker.

Inaugural cook last weekend with 16 lb pork shoulder. Smoked for 18 hours and then wrapped in foil for 3 hours before pulling.

Unbelievably great and moist BBQ.

Only problem was amount of bourbon consumed in process. Made for a ROUGH!!! Monday morning:lol:

smokinjoe
06-12-2012, 06:12
After gettin a BBQ education at the Sampler Took the plunge and bought a Weber Smokey Mtn smoker.

Inaugural cook last weekend with 16 lb pork shoulder. Smoked for 18 hours and then wrapped in foil for 3 hours before pulling.

Unbelievably great and moist BBQ.

Only problem was amount of bourbon consumed in process. Made for a ROUGH!!! Monday morning:lol:

Bill, Thad was just kidding when he said one pour of WLW per pound!!! :D

unclebunk
06-13-2012, 06:11
Bill, Thad was just kidding when he said one pour of WLW per pound!!! :D

No he wasn't. That's just how Big Thad rolls!:grin:

scubadoo97
06-13-2012, 06:54
I posted about this salmon on SB the other day. This is the most recent meal off my smoker. Just tails and bellies seasoned with Dizzy Pig Tsunami Spin and Raging River, maple syrup and demerera sugar.

cigarnv
06-14-2012, 04:15
I am going to continue my trek with brisket.... grabbed a CAB and a good looking "choice" graded one... curious to see the differences once cooked. CAB will hit the grate tomorrow....

scubadoo97
06-14-2012, 10:14
Be interested to see how they compare Reid.
What's been your take on Angus beef in general? Substance or marketing?

cigarnv
06-15-2012, 05:50
Be interested to see how they compare Reid.
What's been your take on Angus beef in general? Substance or marketing?

To this point I would say marketing as if you pick your choice properly, the stuff which leans towards prime rather than select, it is pretty damn good for a decent price. We will see as the CAB is on now and I have a few tasters coming by this evening....

IronHead
06-15-2012, 18:56
Last weekend I did 6 racks of St Louis ribs (Johnny Trigg style) and a 17 lb brisket. I should have gotten a smaller brisket since I had to finish the brisket in the oven to meet my serving time... :)

I snapped pics of the prepped brisket and one when I put it on the smoker but then the rigors (read bourbon and cigar) of an all night cook took its toll and I didn't take any more pics.

Everything turned out great except for a temperature spike about 3/4 through the cook that resulted in the ribs on the bottom rack to get a little dark around the edges. But still darned tasty.

cigarnv
06-16-2012, 07:26
Last weekend I did 6 racks of St Louis ribs (Johnny Trigg style) and a 17 lb brisket. I should have gotten a smaller brisket since I had to finish the brisket in the oven to meet my serving time... :)

I snapped pics of the prepped brisket and one when I put it on the smoker but then the rigors (read bourbon and cigar) of an all night cook took its toll and I didn't take any more pics.

Everything turned out great except for a temperature spike about 3/4 through the cook that resulted in the ribs on the bottom rack to get a little dark around the edges. But still darned tasty.

Mike. What type of brisket do you cook?

IronHead
06-16-2012, 11:54
Mike. What type of brisket do you cook?

Just a choice packer.

T Comp
06-16-2012, 17:18
After gettin a BBQ education at the Sampler Took the plunge and bought a Weber Smokey Mtn smoker.

Inaugural cook last weekend with 16 lb pork shoulder. Smoked for 18 hours and then wrapped in foil for 3 hours before pulling.

Unbelievably great and moist BBQ.

Only problem was amount of bourbon consumed in process. Made for a ROUGH!!! Monday morning:lol:

Welcome to another obsession Bill :cool:. Just got done assembling a new 22 inch WSM to go along with my well worn 18.5. And contrary to my reputation it's beer only during the smoke and bourbon after...you know, patience has its virtues :lol:.

TomH
06-16-2012, 17:45
I cooked a couple of racks of St. Louis cut spares this afternoon on my WSM. I got busy doing some other things and really didn't monitor the heat too well and they cooked too quickly. They tasted great (sprayed them with bourbon when I put them in foil so what would you expect)...but they were "fall of the bone" tender rather than competition standard ribs.

Happyhour24x7
06-17-2012, 15:29
Two racks of baby backs, a salmon filet, and waiting for the shoulder to finish. Two cigars so far. Great Father's day.

cigarnv
06-17-2012, 18:12
Welcome to another obsession Bill :cool:. Just got done assembling a new 22 inch WSM to go along with my well worn 18.5. And contrary to my reputation it's beer only during the smoke and bourbon after...you know, patience has its virtues :lol:.

Way to go Thad!!

cigarnv
06-17-2012, 18:15
I cooked a couple of racks of St. Louis cut spares this afternoon on my WSM. I got busy doing some other things and really didn't monitor the heat too well and they cooked too quickly. They tasted great (sprayed them with bourbon when I put them in foil so what would you expect)...but they were "fall of the bone" tender rather than competition standard ribs.

Tom, most comp. cooks like the food they do in the backyard bett than their turn in meat in most cases.

Happyhour24x7
06-20-2012, 06:31
results from Sunday
136921369313694

cigarnv
06-20-2012, 09:46
results from Sunday
136921369313694

Lookin real good J

steeltownbbq
06-20-2012, 18:38
Since you asked...last Saturday cooked 10 pork butts, a pan of beans and a couple of racks of ribs for the help. Didn't take any pictures

Cooked for a small party Sat nite and a large one next week when I'm scheduled to work and some extra for the freezer. Pulled the pork, vacuum packed and quick cooled in ice bath and put in freezer. It will reheat in an electric roaster and taste like it just came off of the fire.

cigarnv
06-21-2012, 04:33
Since you asked...last Saturday cooked 10 pork butts, a pan of beans and a couple of racks of ribs for the help. Didn't take any pictures

Cooked for a small party Sat nite and a large one next week when I'm scheduled to work and some extra for the freezer. Pulled the pork, vacuum packed and quick cooled in ice bath and put in freezer. It will reheat in an electric roaster and taste like it just came off of the fire.

Do you feel the ice bath is the way to go if you are going to freeze? Do you ice bath right off the smoker? Thanks

DPPSmoker
06-21-2012, 19:27
Hi folks. I got a DPP Fat 50 smoker. My cooking got much better the day I got that smoker. I just smoked 70 pounds of pork butts for my nephew's graduation party two weeks ago. I also did two racks of St. Louis ribs (I also use the Johnny Trigg method) and some ABT's. I got tons of compliments on the pulled pork. I used a few techniques that I learned at a bbq cooking class that I attended last year and my pulled pork has certainly taken a few steps forward. I have been pleased with the results.

I'm new here so I will try to post some pics and see how they post.

13724 13725

13726 13727


13728 13729

Happyhour24x7
06-22-2012, 03:08
Lookin real good J
Thanks Reid. I was really happy with the shoulder , it was the first one I've attempted. Think I might invest in a purpose built smoker soon instead of relying on the kettle.

steeltownbbq
06-22-2012, 23:06
Do you feel the ice bath is the way to go if you are going to freeze? Do you ice bath right off the smoker? Thanks

The ice bath worked great. I packed the pulled pork into about 5 lb bags, and I wanted them cooled quickly. After a couple of hours in a cooler full of ice and water they were cold and ready for the freezer.

Sure don't want to risk getting people sick

I always let the butts sit in a Cambro for a couple of hours after I take them from the smoker... then pull. We chilled the meat as we pulled it.

passthebourbon
06-23-2012, 08:02
Just picked up two slabs of Berkshire baby back ribs...just a tad over 3 pounds of meat for 3 people. Any good rubs or bourbon recipes I can incorporate? Haven't had a chance to light up my Weber Smokey Mountain since last fall, so I'm really looked forward to inhaling some of that nice smokey pork goodness. Oh, and I have a bag of apple wood and a bag of mesquite. Any strong opinions on either?

doubleblank
06-23-2012, 08:47
Apple wood for the ribs is my recomendation. Sometimes I mix bourbon and apple juice in a spritzer bottle to spritz the ribs while on the WSM. Don't know if it adds flavor, but it smells nice. And an internet search will turn up many easy-to-make BBQ sauces incorporating bourbon. A quick BBQ sauce is to reduce 1/2 cup of bourbon down to less than 1/4 cup and add to your favorite store bought sauce.

passthebourbon
06-23-2012, 11:05
Apple wood for the ribs is my recomendation. Sometimes I mix bourbon and apple juice in a spritzer bottle to spritz the ribs while on the WSM. Don't know if it adds flavor, but it smells nice. And an internet search will turn up many easy-to-make BBQ sauces incorporating bourbon. A quick BBQ sauce is to reduce 1/2 cup of bourbon down to less than 1/4 cup and add to your favorite store bought sauce.

Thanks for the tip. Applewood it is. I have a go-to rub that I may go with on one slab, and get experimental on the other.

T Comp
06-23-2012, 13:13
Thanks for the tip. Applewood it is. I have a go-to rub that I may go with on one slab, and get experimental on the other.

If your using a WSM I'd stay away from mesqite for smoking as there is just not enough air flow in and out to prevent bitterness from creeping in. Much better for direct grilling.

I'm smoking 2 pork butts for the first run on my new 22 inch WSM and yes it ran a bit hot the first 2 hours (up to 300) but now got it chugging away at 260. Due to the WSM being unseasoned I'm using a full water pan and shade from a patio table umbrella too. The butts are for my cousin's party tomorrow so for dinner I'm going to do a small Rib Eye roast on a direct cook (no pan at all) with my old 18.5 inch WSM.

cigarnv
06-23-2012, 13:58
Hi folks. I got a DPP Fat 50 smoker. My cooking got much better the day I got that smoker. I just smoked 70 pounds of pork butts for my nephew's graduation party two weeks ago. I also did two racks of St. Louis ribs (I also use the Johnny Trigg method) and some ABT's. I got tons of compliments on the pulled pork. I used a few techniques that I learned at a bbq cooking class that I attended last year and my pulled pork has certainly taken a few steps forward. I have been pleased with the results.

I'm new here so I will try to post some pics and see how they post.

13724 13725

13726 13727


13728 13729

Looks excellent ! Great job.

decaturbob
07-23-2012, 13:15
Cooked up several pounds of short ribs on the BGE yesterday (Sunday). Rubbed, hickory-smoked for a couple of hours and then slow-cooked another 3 hours in beef broth and bourbon (Old Fitzgerald 1849). Finished with a bourbon and honey glaze made with the juices from the ribs. Cook short ribs long enough at a low temp and they melt in your mouth!

DPPSmoker
07-23-2012, 16:26
steeltownbbq, I hope you don't mind me asking this question - when you reheat pulled pork in an electric roaster, what moisture (if any) and how much do you add to the pulled pork?


Since you asked...last Saturday cooked 10 pork butts, a pan of beans and a couple of racks of ribs for the help. Didn't take any pictures

Cooked for a small party Sat nite and a large one next week when I'm scheduled to work and some extra for the freezer. Pulled the pork, vacuum packed and quick cooled in ice bath and put in freezer. It will reheat in an electric roaster and taste like it just came off of the fire.

DPPSmoker
07-23-2012, 17:08
Here are some pics of my recent cook. My brother was visiting from Kentucky and I had to repay him for delivering some bourbon to me that I can't find in Michigan. I smoked a couple butts, an 8 pound brisket, three racks of ribs and some ABTs.

13935

13937

13938

ratcheer
07-25-2012, 11:15
I just had my birthday last week and my big present was a large Big Green Egg. All I can say so far is, Wow! The first evening, I grilled chicken breasts. They came out crispy and brown on the outside, but they were juicy and tender on the inside. The next day, I slow cooked beef ribs with a spicy steak rub made by my youngest son from one of Stephen Raichlen's recipes. The next day I slow roasted a cured picnic that had been injected with maple syrup. This evening, I plan to do my first burgers.

Again, wow! I am beginning to wonder if my trusty old CharBroil will ever be lit again.

Tim

Phil T
07-29-2012, 13:54
For the first time in 2 yrs, I decided to do some baby backs tonight. Sometimes, life gets in the way and you forget the simple things that are so good. My 28 yr old son will be joining me. Not sure if it will be a bourbon or beer evening, either way, I can't lose.

And of course, late summer brings an abundance of local sweet corn. Sometimes its good to be a midwesterner.

ratcheer
07-30-2012, 08:28
I tried a new technique, yesterday. The recipe is from Weber but I did it in my new Big Green Egg.

I had four large boneless pork chops, about 2" thick. I made a brine solution of 2 C water, 3 T Kosher salt, and 1 T sugar. Brined the chops for about 2 hours. Dried them with paper towels, then rubbed them with freshly ground black pepper and rosemary leaves.

I set up the BGE for direct grilling and 400 deg F. Cooked the chops for 12 minutes per side with the lid closed. They were ever so slightly overcooked, but man, thay tasted really good.

Tim

JB64
08-02-2012, 16:04
I tried a new technique, yesterday. The recipe is from Weber but I did it in my new Big Green Egg.

I had four large boneless pork chops, about 2" thick. I made a brine solution of 2 C water, 3 T Kosher salt, and 1 T sugar. Brined the chops for about 2 hours. Dried them with paper towels, then rubbed them with freshly ground black pepper and rosemary leaves.

I set up the BGE for direct grilling and 400 deg F. Cooked the chops for 12 minutes per side with the lid closed. They were ever so slightly overcooked, but man, thay tasted really good.

Tim

I know this is a thread about smoking but I also grilled pork chops last week that were the hit of my party. These were the thin bone in loin chops you get at Sams Club. I brined them for 2 hours in 2Q of water, 1/2C kosher salt, 1/2C molasses, and about 2T of black peppercorns. I rinsed them off patted them dry and grilled on my gas grill for about 3 minutes a side. They came out juicy and tender. One of these days I am going to spring for a BGE myself and add it to the rest of my outdoor cooking lineup. I am sure it will make my wife happy, not.

Happyhour24x7
08-19-2012, 14:25
Despite the rain today, i am just finishing up a couple racks of ribs and a bluefish filet. Looking and smelling good.

ratcheer
08-20-2012, 07:48
I tried a 5-lb fresh pork picnic on the Egg. My seasonings and sauce were huge successes, but my cooking was a failure. I tried to go "low and slow", but I didn't cook it long enough. I had to finish it off in the microwave after slicing it and deciding it was too raw to eat.

My dry rub was simple and wonderful. 1/3 cup Tony Chachere's Creole seasoning, 1/3 cup brown sugar, and 1 1/2 teaspoons dry mustard.

My sauce was "Almost Dreamland", a recipe I found on the web to emulate the sauce of the famous Dreamland rib place in Tuscaloosa, AL. The flavor came very close, but the balance was way too acidic. After the initial use, I added more sugar and more dark Karo syrup, cooked it a little more, and then it was just about perfect. The recipe is about a third of the way down this page: http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/9-3.html#9.4

Tim

JB64
08-20-2012, 21:31
Tim,

Thanks for the link to that page of BBQ sauces. I see a few on there I might try.

unclebunk
08-21-2012, 03:47
I know this is a thread about smoking but I also grilled pork chops last week that were the hit of my party. These were the thin bone in loin chops you get at Sams Club. I brined them for 2 hours in 2Q of water, 1/2C kosher salt, 1/2C molasses, and about 2T of black peppercorns. I rinsed them off patted them dry and grilled on my gas grill for about 3 minutes a side. They came out juicy and tender.

Sounds great, Jim. I'll be trying your brine and grill method on the weekend. Thanks!


One of these days I am going to spring for a BGE myself and add it to the rest of my outdoor cooking lineup. I am sure it will make my wife happy, not.

You can do no wrong, brother. As long as you're buying the BGE with love in your heart. (At least that's what I'd tell her!):grin:

steeltownbbq
08-21-2012, 20:07
steeltownbbq, I hope you don't mind me asking this question - when you reheat pulled pork in an electric roaster, what moisture (if any) and how much do you add to the pulled pork?

I guess I need check in on the forum more often....

To answer DPPSmoker - I put a moderate amount of sauce on the pulled pork when I freeze it. It doesn't really need much additional suace/moisture when reheated. I ran into some folks this weekend who were at the party with the pre-cooked BBQ and they complemented it highly

steeltownbbq
08-21-2012, 20:11
Smoker report: modified my smoker to a run charcoal for grilling and cooked 100 + steaks for a large party. I have never grilled that quantity before, and all I could think was "I hope I don't screw up - they paid a lot of $$$ for this meat"

Came out OK - when I pulled out there were about 6 steaks left

fussychicken
08-26-2012, 13:04
Many thanks to all you guys on here for making me drool which finally pushed me to give this a shot for myself. I spent hours obsessing over Meathead's fantastic amazingribs.com site, and felt like it I might could make it work. With only a weber kettle, hover grill, and smokernator, it was time to smoke some butts. I must admit I got pretty cocky for my first smoke and committed to making pulled pork for a party of 40. Yikes, what am I getting myself in to? I got 25lbs of butts, and I had to rig the hell out of the weber to make it all fit, but success! The weber and smokernator did great, and I was able to keep 200-250 for a solid 13 hour run. Made it through the "stall" and got them up to 190. WOWOWOW. SO GOOD. I gotta do this more often!!!

stevegoz
08-26-2012, 16:37
I'm a fan -- of Meathead, and the Smokenator. I find it easier to keep the temp consistent on my 27" Weber than on my 22", though. I think it might be like keeping an aquarium that way -- the more volume you have to work with, the harder it is to screw things up!


Many thanks to all you guys on here for making me drool which finally pushed me to give this a shot for myself. I spent hours obsessing over Meathead's fantastic amazingribs.com site, and felt like it I might could make it work. With only a weber kettle, hover grill, and smokernator, it was time to smoke some butts. I must admit I got pretty cocky for my first smoke and committed to making pulled pork for a party of 40. Yikes, what am I getting myself in to? I got 25lbs of butts, and I had to rig the hell out of the weber to make it all fit, but success! The weber and smokernator did great, and I was able to keep 200-250 for a solid 13 hour run. Made it through the "stall" and got them up to 190. WOWOWOW. SO GOOD. I gotta do this more often!!!

unclebunk
08-27-2012, 06:30
I'm a fan -- of Meathead, and the Smokenator. I find it easier to keep the temp consistent on my 27" Weber than on my 22", though. I think it might be like keeping an aquarium that way -- the more volume you have to work with, the harder it is to screw things up!

Meathead is my neighbor and a very cool guy to drink beer with and shoot the shit over some BBQ. That boy knows his stuff!

stevegoz
08-27-2012, 09:18
Meathead is my neighbor and a very cool guy to drink beer with and shoot the shit over some BBQ. That boy knows his stuff!

I'd heard he lived in the 60513 -- a buddy of mine bumped into him at Tischler's.

fussychicken
08-27-2012, 20:23
I'm a fan -- of Meathead, and the Smokenator. I find it easier to keep the temp consistent on my 27" Weber than on my 22", though. I think it might be like keeping an aquarium that way -- the more volume you have to work with, the harder it is to screw things up!

Yeah, I've read that while some think the 22" Weber (what I have) works good, you have to spend a lot of time tending it. I wouldn't know as I've never done it any other way, but it didn't seem too bad to me. Early in the morning required more coals, but in the afternoon with the sun on the weber, I had a couple of nice long runs that lasted for 3-4 hours at a time.



Meathead is my neighbor and a very cool guy to drink beer with and shoot the shit over some BBQ. That boy knows his stuff!

If you see him anytime soon, tell him I said thanks!! While I am by no means an expert, his site helped me have a very successful first smoke.

stevegoz
09-02-2012, 09:51
Three racks of baby back ribs going on the 27" Weber with Smokenator for what looks like it will end up being an indoor Q this afternoon. Five pounds of wings and 20 or so cheese-stuffed jalapenos will join in later.

stevegoz
09-03-2012, 22:05
Bit of a fail -- for $1.88/pound, I should've expected that these mutant ribs (one rack was the full length of my kettle, 27 inches) would pose some issues. I could not get the dang membranes off, so for the first time in years I smoked them with them on. Made for rough and chewy and fatty ribs. Blech. (In hindsight, I should've scored the thing to help render some of the fat, at least.)

Good thing the wings, poppers, pizzas and shrimp were good so my crowd foregave me....


Three racks of baby back ribs going on the 27" Weber with Smokenator for what looks like it will end up being an indoor Q this afternoon. Five pounds of wings and 20 or so cheese-stuffed jalapenos will join in later.

unclebunk
09-04-2012, 06:18
I know this is a thread about smoking but I also grilled pork chops last week that were the hit of my party. These were the thin bone in loin chops you get at Sams Club. I brined them for 2 hours in 2Q of water, 1/2C kosher salt, 1/2C molasses, and about 2T of black peppercorns. I rinsed them off patted them dry and grilled on my gas grill for about 3 minutes a side. They came out juicy and tender. One of these days I am going to spring for a BGE myself and add it to the rest of my outdoor cooking lineup. I am sure it will make my wife happy, not.

Did your brining yesterday for two hours before grilling the thin cut Sam's Club porkchops. They cooked up quickly (about 4-5 minutes a side) and then we cut the bones away to make porkchop sandwiches with a bit of BBQ sauce and freshly-made coleslaw on top. Juicy and delicious, as you said. Everybody loved 'em!

JB64
09-04-2012, 21:31
Did your brining yesterday for two hours before grilling the thin cut Sam's Club porkchops. They cooked up quickly (about 4-5 minutes a side) and then we cut the bones away to make porkchop sandwiches with a bit of BBQ sauce and freshly-made coleslaw on top. Juicy and delicious, as you said. Everybody loved 'em!

I am glad you had success with the chops and honored that you tried my technique. Brining works wonders with lean cuts of meat including boneless skinless chicken breasts. I get a lot of my ideas from the great guys on smokingmeatforums.com.

unclebunk
09-05-2012, 06:25
I am glad you had success with the chops and honored that you tried my technique. Brining works wonders with lean cuts of meat including boneless skinless chicken breasts. I get a lot of my ideas from the great guys on smokingmeatforums.com.

Funny you should say that, as one of my guests thought the same brining technique would be great with chicken. Will check it out on Saturday. I'm telling you, our spin on the Memphis-style pulled pork sandwich with slaw on top (substituting the de-boned porkchop) was absolutely killer! My wife even went a step further and added a few Trader Joe's bread and butter pickles on her sammie for some additional sweetness and crunch. Time to start a fast food chain 'cause we're on to somethin'!:grin:

ILLfarmboy
09-08-2012, 13:20
I'm more of a griller than a smoker, but last weekend I smoked a chuck roast and then used it to make beef/vegetable soup. this weekend I'm doing a rump roast and plan on using it to make chili.


Enjoying some WT RR 101 while going back and forth between the grill and the computer.

JB64
09-11-2012, 22:12
I'm more of a griller than a smoker, but last weekend I smoked a chuck roast and then used it to make beef/vegetable soup. this weekend I'm doing a rump roast and plan on using it to make chili.


Enjoying some WT RR 101 while going back and forth between the grill and the computer.


Some of my favorite times are in the summer sitting outside with a nice glass of bourbon and a good cigar while babysitting my smoker. I have never had any luck smoking rump roasts, let us know how yours turned out.

ILLfarmboy
09-12-2012, 16:47
Some of my favorite times are in the summer sitting outside with a nice glass of bourbon and a good cigar while babysitting my smoker. I have never had any luck smoking rump roasts, let us know how yours turned out.


Cooked it at 220 for a couple hours. Pulled it off at an internal temp of 145. After resting I sliced enough off for two sandwiches and used the meat to make chili the next day, sliced it and then diced the slices. the sandwiches and the chili were good

I wouldn't say I smoked it. More like slow roasted. As the meat lost moisture and began to firm up I got nervous and decided to take it off when it was a little more than medium rare. Did the same thing with the chuck roast last week.


What's the deal. How do you guys cook something for so many hours and get it to fall apart like a pot roast that's been in a crock pot all day, without it getting dry. I gotta admit I'm totally confused about this.

JB64
09-12-2012, 20:33
Cooked it at 220 for a couple hours. Pulled it off at an internal temp of 145. After resting I sliced enough off for two sandwiches and used the meat to make chili the next day, sliced it and then diced the slices. the sandwiches and the chili were good

I wouldn't say I smoked it. More like slow roasted. As the meat lost moisture and began to firm up I got nervous and decided to take it off when it was a little more than medium rare. Did the same thing with the chuck roast last week.


What's the deal. How do you guys cook something for so many hours and get it to fall apart like a pot roast that's been in a crock pot all day, without it getting dry. I gotta admit I'm totally confused about this.

I have my best results when smoking cuts that have some fat running through them. I like to smoke pork butts, spare ribs, and beef brisket. These cuts have fat in them while rump roasts and pork loins are fairly lean. When you smoke the fattier cuts of meat low and slow you give the meat muscles time to break down while the surrounding fat helps keep it moist. The slow roasting was probably the best method for the rump roast along with not letting the IT get over 145.

Luna56
09-27-2012, 21:31
I like smoking, slow roasting and drying hot peppers that I grind up and use throughout the year.
I use hickory chunks in a Weber, move the coals to one side and put the peppers on the cool side. Some get roasted more than others and they all taste fantastic.

The smoky flavor is incredible and we put it in soups, chowders, pizza, baked beans, you name it. I eat some every day. I made a sauce to drizzle on pan seared tuna steaks (rare) with toasted sesame oil, tamari, rice wine vinegar, mirin and some of this ground smoked pepper and it was one of the best things I ate all year.

Here's a pic of some before and after smoking/roasting. It's hard to tell from the crappy iPhone pic but they get this beautiful patina, like lacquered red leather.
14236

If you have some time to kill on the grill, toss a few peppers on there and smoke 'em up.

Cheers!

scubadoo97
12-16-2012, 15:50
What temp do you smoke them at?
I did some jalapeņos a long time ago and they didn't dry out but were very smokey and not in a good way

JB64
04-07-2013, 22:29
It was so nice outside today I decided to smoke a chicken. I used my Weber kettle grill instead of firing up my big smoker for one yardbird. Sitting outside with a cigar and a bourbon and coke while tending the smoker is one of my favorite summertime activities. I smoked it for about 2 1/2 hours at 300. The skin was crisp, the darkness was the spice rub which blackened during the smoke. The skin on the legs pulled back while smoking which made for an ugly bird but the end result tasted great. I paired the smoked chicken with some red beans and rice.

151161511715118

Josh
04-08-2013, 06:30
I tried to smoke half a turkey breast in the old flowerpot on Saturday. Thought 6 hrs at 200-250 would be enough, but it wasn't and I had to finish it up in the oven. Took longer than expected there too. I was afraid it would dry by the time it made it to a safe internal temp, but it was perfect. Cut it up and made burritos. As my daughter said, it was "Delishush".

TheNovaMan
04-08-2013, 16:08
I made a fatty last Friday. Details in this thread: http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?19794-My-First-Fatty&p=335370#post335370

Grain Belt
04-12-2013, 07:18
Recent app night to go with some Manhattans and Old Fashioneds.

1) ABT (atomic buffalo turds) - jalapenos cored and sliced lengthwise. Stuffed with cream cheese, finely shredded cheddar, bbq rub, garlic, pepper mixture and topped with 1/3 slice of bacon. Smoked until bacon is crisp with apple wood.

2) Smoked Wings. Wing tips off. Basic BBQ rub. Apple wood smoked until skin crisp and fat rendered at about 325. Sauced and put back on the smoker for ten minutes

Sauce- 1/3 cup melted butter, 1/3 cup honey, 1/3 cup Siracha sauce heated and thoroughly mixed

Both were outstanding with cocktails.

DaveOfAtl
04-12-2013, 07:46
I've been curing a 5 lb slab of pork belly for a week. Trying a maple cure this time (salt, curing salt, dark brown sugar, and maple syrup). Going to smoke it Sunday with hickory and apple wood.

TheNovaMan
04-12-2013, 13:36
Both the above posts sound tasty!

Old Dusty
04-12-2013, 19:22
I've been curing a 5 lb slab of pork belly for a week. Trying a maple cure this time (salt, curing salt, dark brown sugar, and maple syrup). Going to smoke it Sunday with hickory and apple wood.

dave wonder how some Maple Crown would work in that cure?

steeltownbbq
04-12-2013, 20:11
Anybody ever try smoking corned beef brisket? I'm thinking its basically just a heavily marinated brisket. Anyway - I'm going to give it a try on Sunday.

TheNovaMan
04-12-2013, 21:35
I've heard that doesn't go too well, unless you're expecting smokey corned beef. Then it probably works awesomely.

ratcheer
04-13-2013, 06:24
I have been recovering from eye surgeries (lens replacement in both eyes); last night was my first cookout for the past few weeks.

I decided to try a different cooking method for my chicken pieces on my large Big Green Egg. I have been getting pretty good results cooking directly over the fire at 400F for about 20 to 24 minutes. However, the last time one of those huge modern chicken breasts (one of my pet peeves) did not get completely done and had to be finished in the microwave. So this time I cooked them indirect at 350-375F for one hour. Man, they were good! Perfectly crispy brown on the outside and thoroughly roasted and juicy on the inside.

The seasoning I used as a dry rub was Cajun Injector lemon pepper seasoning.

Tim

scubadoo97
04-13-2013, 15:54
Congrats on the new lenses Tim. Cools stuff. Sky's a bit bluer these days

Some spares went on the smoker this morning. They were good

Grain Belt
04-15-2013, 07:13
Anybody ever try smoking corned beef brisket? I'm thinking its basically just a heavily marinated brisket. Anyway - I'm going to give it a try on Sunday.

I have done it many times. It is quite good. I put cold water in a large stainless pot and soak the corned beef for 2-3 hours and change the water each hour. Then I pat the meat dry with paper towels. Next a place a healthy dose of garlic powder and fresh cracked pepper on the outside. I smoke until it reaches 150-160 internal and then foil until it hits 190 internal. It is usually very tender but still sliceable at this point. I then let it rest about 40 minutes uncovered and then slice thin. It is now Pastrami! (smoked corned meat) Some people like the rub to be ground corriander and pepper. Give it a try!

squire
04-15-2013, 07:43
Hadn't thought of doing my own pastrami, very interesting.

DaveOfAtl
04-15-2013, 08:48
dave wonder how some Maple Crown would work in that cure?

Interesting thought, though I'm not sure I'd have much use for the leftover Maple Crown. I thought about throwing some bourbon in there, but sorta doubt you'd be able to detect it after being smoked.

Old Dusty
04-15-2013, 12:51
Interesting thought, though I'm not sure I'd have much use for the leftover Maple Crown. I thought about throwing some bourbon in there, but sorta doubt you'd be able to detect it after being smoked.

I got some as a gift and am inventing ways to use it. Marinade for pork seems logical. Also a shot called a "McGriddle" great for tailgating. 50/50 Crown Maple and Butterscotch schnapps w an OJ chaser. Otherwise the stuff is pretty useless:grin:

petrel800
04-15-2013, 14:53
Last night I butterflied a pork tenderloin, stuffed with sour cream, jalapenos, and cheddar cheese. I closed it back up and wrapped it in bacon and threw it on the Big Green Egg with a little Mesquite and Apple wood smoke. Finished with indirect heat. Made a fantastic dinner, the bacon and pork took the smoke nicely, but it was not over the top. Definitely one to try again.

fishnbowljoe
04-21-2013, 21:26
My wife and I just bought our son and DIL a present. The pic below shows it in use.

camduncan
04-21-2013, 21:43
My wife and I just bought our son and DIL a present. The pic below shows it in use.

That's an Aussie BBQ Joe :D

Happyhour24x7
04-22-2013, 02:54
Tried some chicken thighs and pork tenderloins yesterday, half rubbed BBQ style,mother other half with olive oil, garlic, and herbs. Damn, did they take the smoke fast! Turned out good, though, just a little smoke heavy. Good leftovers ready for a busy week.

stevegoz
04-26-2013, 08:52
Slow start to the smoking season -- smoked an already smoked ham and a mess of wings two weekends ago for a family gathering. Was struck again by the way in which tending to the "pit" (a Weber with a Smokenator) for hours desensitizes me to the smoky flavor of the food the day of the smoke. But then when I reheat 'em, the smoke alarm practically goes off and the house smells like magic. :grin:

More wings and some baby backs on tap for this weekend.

DPPSmoker
04-26-2013, 18:30
Tomorrow, I'm going to get my first smoke in this year. Michigan has had a nasty cold and wet spring so far so there hasn't been a good opportunity to smoke until tomorrow.

I'm going to smoke two 8 pound butts, a 4 pound brisket flat, some boneless chicken breasts for the kids and some ABTs.

I'm also looking forward to making some homemade bbq sauce. I'm going to get my three kids to help me. I have never spent any time attempting to make my own sauce because there are too many good sauces out there - it's just too easy to purchase them rather than make the effort to whip one up myself. But I went to a bbq joint a month ago and they made a bbq sauce that used Kona coffee grounds. It was the best bbq sauce I ever had. I found this coffee bourbon bbq sauce recipe - http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/baby-back-ribs-with-coffee-bourbon-barbecue-sauce-recipe/index.html. I'm going to follow the exact recipe and then I'll tweak future batches for my own taste.

I'll do my best to take pics.

TheNovaMan
04-26-2013, 22:26
Was struck again by the way in which tending to the "pit" (a Weber with a Smokenator) for hours desensitizes me to the smoky flavor of the food the day of the smoke. I have the same problem.

Grain Belt
04-27-2013, 04:57
Simple homemade sauce with a little of Kentucky's finest.

1 1/4 cup ketchup
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup bourbon of choice
1/3 cup honey
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
Lots of freshly cracked pepper to taste

Bring ingredients to a boil while stirring frequently then turn down to simmer for 15 minutes. Keeps in fridge for several weeks. I like to put it on ribs or chicken thighs for about 10 minutes at the end of my cooks to set the sauce.

Jono
04-30-2013, 15:17
I like to grill pizzas but have not smoked one. What wood chips do you use for pizza smoking?

http://www.livestrong.com/article/431031-how-to-grill-pizza-on-a-smoker/

Does anyone use a Traeger grill / smoker?
http://www.traegergrills.com/shop/grills#

JB64
04-30-2013, 15:52
I would probably never smoke a pizza, I like cooking pizza in a super hot oven or modified grill for a couple of minutes as opposed to up to an hour at 250 degrees. That being said if I were to try to smoke a pizza I would probably use a fruit tree wood, apple, cherry, or pecan.

I have couple of friends who own Traegers. They seem to do a good job of temperature control, the pellets can be kind of pricey. They are for the set it and forget king of people, I like to fuss with my stick burner while I am smoking.

Jono
04-30-2013, 16:02
Thanks for the info! I guess you could do the grillin smoke option.....having some pre-soaked chips in the container.

Meruck
04-30-2013, 18:23
My brother sent me this so blame him.

15273

It does have Whiskey in it..........so that makes it healthy.

I did it and could not believe how good (bad for you) it is. A close friend prepared itand after stated "take the receipe to a pool of calm water, throw it in, if its ever needed, it will rise again".


http://bacontoday.com/whiskey-maple-glazed-slab-bacon/

Jono
04-30-2013, 18:57
Maybe the Lady of the Lake will throw back out!

Actually, it looks like it could be a nice appetizer.

"The glaze has pineapple, maple syrup, Irish whiskey, red wine vinegar and cayenne paper. " I think a bourbon would work better.

Meruck
04-30-2013, 20:00
I used Bourbon, poured it out of my Whiskey glass that's from Canada, designed in Scotland.......................................... .........

petrel800
05-03-2013, 21:55
1530415305

8.4 lb Butt. Going to be served at a Derby Party tomorrow.

Been on for 2 hours now, grate temp has been pretty constant at 225-230, and we're up to about 100 degrees. About to snooze on the couch, looking forward to tomorrow.

scubadoo97
05-04-2013, 11:36
Cold smoked a brined salmon filet this morning

15307

Grain Belt
05-04-2013, 17:57
This week I have been curing wild duck, wild goose, and wild turkey breasts. The duck and goose is in a corning cure like what would be used to make corned beef. The wild turkey breast has a little sweeter cure with a little garlic too. I will smoke these tasty treats tomorrow with apple wood. The duck and goose breasts will be coated with garlic and pepper and after being smoked will be a type of pastrami.

petrel800
05-05-2013, 09:11
1530415305

8.4 lb Butt. Going to be served at a Derby Party tomorrow.

Been on for 2 hours now, grate temp has been pretty constant at 225-230, and we're up to about 100 degrees. About to snooze on the couch, looking forward to tomorrow.

Boy, this butt was a marathon, 20 hours to get to temp, but it can out excellent.

smokinjoe
05-23-2013, 10:47
BTW Smokers, grillers, and BBQers, Home Depot has a sale going on with Kingsford Charcoal. (2) 20 lb bags for $9.88. I believe that is a really good deal, and worthy enough to stock up on.

Lowe's has a similar deal at $9.99 for the 2 bags.

callmeox
05-23-2013, 10:52
BTW Smokers, grillers, and BBQers, Home Depot has a sale going on with Kingsford Charcoal. (2) 20 lb bags for $9.88. I believe that is a really good deal, and worthy enough to stock up on.

Lowe's has a similar deal at $9.99 for the 2 bags.

Thanks Joe. This is the stock up time of the year.

Meruck
05-23-2013, 10:53
Now we're starting a scare by bunkering charcoal...........................thanks for the heads up, that is a decent price.

DPPSmoker
05-23-2013, 17:42
BTW Smokers, grillers, and BBQers, Home Depot has a sale going on with Kingsford Charcoal. (2) 20 lb bags for $9.88. I believe that is a really good deal, and worthy enough to stock up on.

Lowe's has a similar deal at $9.99 for the 2 bags.

Thanks for the heads up, Joe. I will be sure to get some this weekend.

savagehenry
05-25-2013, 09:31
Making my first spare ribs of the season.
Made a homemade dry rub & East Carolina moppin' sauce.
Also made some simple syrup for the cocktails.

stevegoz
05-25-2013, 13:21
So unfair...my Big Green Egg arrived at 5 pm yesterday. And all of our plans today and tomorrow are away from home. So I'll have to wait 'til Monday to break it in with some St. Louis cut spareribs.... #WPP

hectic1
05-25-2013, 14:32
Just prepped a Brisket with some Dizzy Pig Cow Lick that will go the Cookshack tonight around 11pm or so :)

elbowguru
05-26-2013, 18:52
Doing a pork loin with ginger, lime, garlic, five spice, bourbon smoked sea salt, brown sugar, ground Thai chilies and Hungarian paprika. Went full-on with the seasoning, we'll see how it turns out. About another hour left

Restaurant man
05-26-2013, 20:48
Whole chicken this morning, smoked short ribs for dinner and just dropped a pork shoulder in the egg. That one will be lunch tomorrow after an all night hickory smoke. And some FR SMB 2012 to keep me company :grin:

Grain Belt
05-27-2013, 07:30
This evening it is going to be beer brats for a main course with jalapeno poppers and smoked wings with a Siracha sauce off the Weber kettle for apps. On Sat. I smoked three racks of spares with a little apple and pecan on the Weber kettle. Yesterday I grilled turkey tenderloins (the inner segment of the breast found in all poultry) with some Yukon golds. I seared the turkey pieces and then finished them indirect on the kettle. This weekend I also replaced all the internal components in my Weber Summit Silver gasser. I put in new burners, flavorizer bars, and grates. As you can tell I'm a little loyal to my Webers. I have two 22 1/2 inch kettles, an 18 inch Jumbo Joe portable, and the Summit gasser. I enjoy cooking on them very much.

Happyhour24x7
05-27-2013, 18:28
Did a shoulder today, with a NC vinager-y sauce, slaw and beans. Threw some bluefish in as well. Turned out great. GF made a strawberry tart, and I'm topping it off with a Cuban Partagas #4. Good day.

stevegoz
06-08-2013, 22:07
Working on a brisket on the BGE for my nephew's HS graduation party tomorrow. Got a little cocky with the "set it and forget it" concept -- went to dinner downtown, then to a friend's to watch the latter half of the Black Hawks' game. Came home after five and a half hours away to find the fire had gone out and the big hunk o' beef down to 107 degrees. The relight and cook is underway....

Pieface
06-09-2013, 06:13
Looks like this is where the gurus gather :)

Tried my first pulled pork today in a weber kettle. Pretty successful but a few questions for the illuminati...

I set up and ran with approx 225-250F for the cook, as pretty chuffed I managed that with zero practice! I knew about the stall around 150-160F and rode that out fine.

However I seemed to hit a second stall at 180F. Finally had to pull it off after 10.5 hour cook and had been anchored on 180F for the final 2.5 hrs. Can anyone advise a newbie what happened? I was aiming to go through to a final temp of 195-200F. I checked the kettle temp and the meat temp with a couple of different thermometers and they were consistent so I'm pretty sure I was in the ballpark.

Not sure what difference final temp would have made. The pork was flavourful and pulled pretty easily as far as I can tell. I thought it could be more tender though...

Grain Belt
06-09-2013, 06:21
Did you foil? Often on my kettle I will foil at 170 or so until it hits 200. I will then rest it in a cooler for an hour or two, and then pull. If you are running out of coals after the foil you can also just throw it in the oven. All you need is a heat source at this stage. If the coals are still working well then by all means keep it on the kettle for the foil stage too.

Pieface
06-09-2013, 06:35
Hi GB :)

No I didn't foil. I read it was better to keep it simple first time out and try not to get in the kettle much at all.

Kettle was still sitting solid as a rock at 228F 30 minutes after I took the pork out. I closed it all down at that point to save whatever fuel was left.

I wrapped the pork in foil and rested for a bit over an hour before pulling.

Grain Belt
06-09-2013, 19:53
Hi to you Pieface. It sounds like the most important part was the good taste you achieved. If you can keep the faith and keep the pork on the kettle until it hits 195 or 200 I think you will hit a new stage of tenderness. The foil rest for an hour or two is great. To play devil's advocate some old timers I know never foil at any stage because they feel it ruins the bark. I tend to like the tenderness I gain with foil more than super crunchy bark so I use the method I previously mentioned. Glad to hear about another Weber enthusiast trying some new things.

elbowguru
06-12-2013, 18:28
Sid my first go at armadillo eggs. Didn't want to cut up a bunch of jalapenos, so I used larger chilies. Made the frau one with a poblano, two with anaheim peppers for me, one with a banana for a buddy stopping by later. Just pulled them off the grill and they look fantastic.

Bourbon Boiler
06-12-2013, 18:33
Has anyone ever played around with pipe tobacco on the wood at the end to flavor the smoke? A co-worker asked me about this the other day and I'd never heard of it.

ratcheer
06-15-2013, 17:10
Tonight's cook was fabulous! Baby back ribs on the Big Green Egg. 1) Liberally dry rubbed with equal parts Kosher salt, black pepper, paprika, and brown sugar. 2) Smoked (with hickory chunks) at 250-280 for three hours. 3) Wrapped in foil and add a sauce of 3 T butter, 3 T bourbon, 1/2 C apple cider. Sprinkled the rack liberally with brown sugar. Wrapped up tight and put the foil package back on the grill for one more hour.

I have made some pretty darned good ribs many times before, but these were my best. I got the recipe from Stephen Raichlen's TV show, this morning.

Tim

TheNovaMan
06-19-2013, 23:04
Has anyone ever played around with pipe tobacco on the wood at the end to flavor the smoke? A co-worker asked me about this the other day and I'd never heard of it. As the fictional character Roy "Tin Cup" McAvoy said, "that idea has promise."

stevegoz
06-20-2013, 16:12
Made a great bourbon bacon barbecue sauce today using this recipe (http://www.chow.com/recipes/28482-bourbon-bacon-barbecue-sauce). Some nice double-smoked bacon from Wisconsin and EC 12 for the bourbon. Our knives are ridiculously dull, so I ended up using a stick blender to puree the chunks of bacon and onion when it was done.

I'll be firing up the BGE at sundown tomorrow night to start a 10-pound beef brisket -- hopefully the remote thermometer won't hit me with any warnings overnight. Late in the morning Saturday three racks of St. Louis cut ribs will join the brisket and ultimately get a sauce glaze (I serve the brisket without sauce -- folks can add it if they must). Then in the early afternoon I'll fire up a Weber, get the Smokenator going and smoke up five pounds of wings. Other Webers will be put to use in the late afternoon for burgers, beer brats, hot dogs, shrimp, portabellos, vegi burgers...we love cooking up a storm for our annual Summer Solstice BBQ.

TheNovaMan
06-20-2013, 19:52
Sounds like a good time! I might have to try that sauce...

Grain Belt
06-21-2013, 07:22
Last weekend I stayed at a cabin in Northern Wisconsin to see a concert with some good friends. I brought along my 18 inch Smokey Joe Platinum Weber and filled it with smoked apps for before the show. Using some apple wood with a little Royal Oak charcoal I cooked up some Asian chicken wings, bacon wrapped cheese stuffed jalapenos, and some stuffed mushrooms. I created a second grate for cooking using a 14 inch smokey joe grate, some carriage bolts, washers, and nuts. This allowed me to cook the wings on the top grate at higher heat. It is amazing how much food one can cook on a compact portable grill with a few small mods. Old Grand Dad BIB was my pour of choice to go with everything and it was excellent!

unclebunk
06-21-2013, 07:39
Okay guys. Looking for some quick advice, as my wife just bought me the 18" WSM for Father's Day and I'm anxious to get going now that I've assembled it. I've been reading lots of conflicting info about the necessity of having to season the WSM before I actually start using it to smoke meats. Meathead's web site references Harry Soo's (of Slap Yo' Daddy BBQ fame) method of running one load of briquets at high heat and another one or two with fatty scrap meats that you don't intend to eat, just to get it greasy and smokey inside. Whereas the Virtual Weber Bullet guy says seasoning is unnecessary because the interior of the smoker has a porcelain-type finish (unlike cast iron) and therefore no manufacturing residue to burn off. And if I do follow the Harry Soo method, which calls for smoking bacon, chicken parts and pork fat to grease it up, would it be acceptable to use any throwaway stuff I can get for free from my local butcher or would that put a funky smell in my smoker that I wouldn't get by buying some inexpensive meats at Aldi's? What say ye?

Also, what is the verdict on Weber's Rib Rack (6406 model). I don't want a rack with a design that has too many wires, making clean-up a hassle, but I've read that this popular Weber rack has rather tight spacing, making it difficult to remove ribs any larger than small to medium-sized babybacks.

Finally, please weigh in on what thermometers you guys like to use. I've been eyeing a kit from ThermoWorks that has two "leave in" probes, one for the smoker and one for your meat, and thought I'd supplement it with their inexpensive instant read thermometer (the $20 one, not the $100 Thermopen). Any thoughts/comments/suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

DPPSmoker
06-21-2013, 08:11
Hi to you Pieface. It sounds like the most important part was the good taste you achieved. If you can keep the faith and keep the pork on the kettle until it hits 195 or 200 I think you will hit a new stage of tenderness. The foil rest for an hour or two is great. To play devil's advocate some old timers I know never foil at any stage because they feel it ruins the bark. I tend to like the tenderness I gain with foil more than super crunchy bark so I use the method I previously mentioned. Glad to hear about another Weber enthusiast trying some new things. I just wanted to second everything that Grain Belt stated. When I started smoking, I never foiled my pork butts. My butts were OK but I knew they were not as good as the people who smoke competitively. I attended a bbq class that was hosted by someone who has won a lot of bbq competition. The tips I learned to smoking great bbq have been outstanding. One of the main tips was foiling the butts at the stall temp - around 160 degrees. Not only does foiling the butts at 160 degrees make for better pulled pork, it speeds up the cooking process so you finish smoking a few hours earlier than if you don't foil. The one drawback is that you do lose out on that firmer bark if that is your thing. But if you smoke your butts at 225 degrees during the entire cook and foil when your butts are at 160 degrees, you should have sufficient bark at that time. And your butts will have taken in enough smoke flavor before you foil.

stevegoz
06-21-2013, 11:46
Finally, please weigh in on what thermometers you guys like to use. I've been eyeing a kit from ThermoWorks that has two "leave in" probes, one for the smoker and one for your meat, and thought I'd supplement it with their inexpensive instant read thermometer (the $20 one, not the $100 Thermopen). Any thoughts/comments/suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

So far I'm happy with this dual-probe remote thermometer (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ANCQELE/ref=wms_ohs_product?ie=UTF8&psc=1) -- though it's gone up 20 bucks since I ordered it two weeks ago. And it comes with Meathead's temperature guide magnet!

I love my Thermopen. Of course I ordered it just a few weeks before they introduced the backlit model. Que sera, sera....

Also, the 6406 Weber rib rack can be a PitA when it comes time to remove ribs. On the other hand, I did some very lean baby backs (two pounds per rack) recently with the BGE V-rack (http://www.sanddollarlifestyles.com/big-green-egg-acc/big-green-egg-porcelain-vrack-896?utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=googlebase&cvsfa=4073&cvsfe=2&cvsfhu=34303034&gclid=CJ7A147n9bcCFWYV7Aodfj4AOg) and the copious space allowed one rack of ribs to kinda twist and curl in a most unusual way that I'd never seen before....

unclebunk
06-21-2013, 12:04
So far I'm happy with this dual-probe remote thermometer (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ANCQELE/ref=wms_ohs_product?ie=UTF8&psc=1) -- though it's gone up 20 bucks since I ordered it two weeks ago. And it comes with Meathead's temperature guide magnet!

I love my Thermopen. Of course I ordered it just a few weeks before they introduced the backlit model. Que sera, sera....

Also, the 6406 Weber rib rack can be a PitA when it comes time to remove ribs. On the other hand, I did some very lean baby backs (two pounds per rack) recently with the BGE V-rack (http://www.sanddollarlifestyles.com/big-green-egg-acc/big-green-egg-porcelain-vrack-896?utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=googlebase&cvsfa=4073&cvsfe=2&cvsfhu=34303034&gclid=CJ7A147n9bcCFWYV7Aodfj4AOg) and the copious space allowed one rack of ribs to kinda twist and curl in a most unusual way that I'd never seen before....

Thanks for the quick response, Steve. I nearly purchased that Maverick ET732 a couple of times but hedged on getting it after reading that the programming was a bit confusing and the temp readings could sometimes be wildly inaccurate. I saw it not long ago for as low as $65 and the remote monitoring has great appeal, but the ThermoWorks seems great too and, by reputation, is very reliable. How many times have you used the Maverick and have you seen any odd behavior from it?

stevegoz
06-21-2013, 14:55
Thanks for the quick response, Steve. I nearly purchased that Maverick ET732 a couple of times but hedged on getting it after reading that the programming was a bit confusing and the temp readings could sometimes be wildly inaccurate. I saw it not long ago for as low as $65 and the remote monitoring has great appeal, but the ThermoWorks seems great too and, by reputation, is very reliable. How many times have you used the Maverick and have you seen any odd behavior from it?

So far I've used the Maverick twice. No oddities except that I couldn't get the high-temperature alarms to work the one time I tried to program them. I don't have any real way to verify the accuracy of the grill temp (except that it's always lower then the dome temp on the BGE), but the meat temp matches up to what my Thermopen reads.

Grain Belt
06-21-2013, 19:19
To attempt to reply to the "seasoning" question I feel that there is an in-between answer. I have used many different Weber products both charcoal and gas. I believe there should be a "burn out" on both charcoal and gas products. In the case of the WSM I would light a load of charcoal and try to sustain a temp of 300 or higher for an hour or so to heat off any manufacturing oil residues etc. I don't think a "grease seasoning" will add anything of value for your needs.

unclebunk
06-21-2013, 19:29
Thanks for the info, Grain. I'm leaning towards your suggestion of one hot run before I chuck on a nice Boston butt and think that's what I'll do tomorrow if it doesn't rain.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

JKLS
06-21-2013, 21:38
Cold smoked some Shad roe for "smoked bottarga".

callmeox
06-21-2013, 21:52
I didn't season my WSM and I never had a problem with funk or bad taste.

Old Dusty
06-22-2013, 06:55
Today-try to make authentic Baltimore Pit Beef with Tiger Sauce. Washington Post recipe.

stevegoz
06-22-2013, 08:15
Thanks for the info, Grain. I'm leaning towards your suggestion of one hot run before I chuck on a nice Boston butt and think that's what I'll do tomorrow if it doesn't rain.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Half the fun of outdoor cooking is finding ways to overcome the elements! I've got my BGE under a canopy, but I plan to make something like this (http://braddog.wordpress.com/2008/11/14/rain-gear-for-the-big-green-egg/) as well. Let the smoke get out while keeping the rain out....

tigerlam92
06-24-2013, 21:46
This is my first post here and my second time I did a smoke beef ribs with my hack up smoking rig.

I always love BBQ beef ribs and always had to have it every time I go to Texas. So I was thrill this came out perfect.

See image of the monster ribs and the nice smoke ring. I am so happy to be able to do this. And I didn't have to buy a smoker which I was contemplating just a couple of days ago.

Dry rub, smoke 4-5 hours then finish with bourbon based BBQ sauce and another 30 minutes of low and slow.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/06/25/a8evybes.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/06/25/upu6evu7.jpg

Cheers
Hugh

TheNovaMan
06-24-2013, 22:06
Nice smoke ring!

tigerlam92
06-24-2013, 23:24
Nice smoke ring!

I do a lot of grilling and fire stuff (even roasted two pigs in a backyard before) but this is the first smoke ring I got from smoking at home myself. :)

Thanks

jtexaslonestar
06-25-2013, 04:14
Very nice---i like the 2-zone setup.

Sent from my MB886 using Tapatalk 2

mbroo5880i
06-25-2013, 18:22
Just plain old burgers. Although they were ground chuck instead of our usual ground sirloin. A little fat adds flavor. Of course, everything tastes better when you grill it while drinking bourbon.

squire
06-25-2013, 18:25
I find Bourbon an essential aid to grilling.

TheNovaMan
06-25-2013, 20:04
I agree with Squire, although I find a very cold beer is almost as good.

To Tiger, your first smoke ring is always the one that gets you the most excited, but now you'll try to get deeper and deeper smoke rings. It's just the way it goes.

T Comp
06-25-2013, 20:33
This is my first post here and my second time I did a smoke beef ribs with my hack up smoking rig.

I always love BBQ beef ribs and always had to have it every time I go to Texas. So I was thrill this came out perfect.

See image of the monster ribs and the nice smoke ring. I am so happy to be able to do this. And I didn't have to buy a smoker which I was contemplating just a couple of days ago.

Dry rub, smoke 4-5 hours then finish with bourbon based BBQ sauce and another 30 minutes of low and slow.

Cheers
Hugh

Those are some beautiful looking beef ribs Hugh. Very difficult to find in these parts. You got me both jealous and hungry :grin:.

Bourbon Boiler
06-27-2013, 18:59
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/styles/UndergroundStyle/misc/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by Bourbon Boilerhttp://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/styles/UndergroundStyle/buttons/viewpost-right.png (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?p=349444#post349444)Has anyone ever played around with pipe tobacco on the wood at the end to flavor the smoke? A co-worker asked me about this the other day and I'd never heard of it.



As the fictional character Roy "Tin Cup" McAvoy said, "that idea has promise."

I think I'm going to get a chance to try it this weekend. I'll post results.

TheNovaMan
06-27-2013, 19:27
Sweet! I was going to try it last week, but I didn't have any baccy on hand and there wasn't time to go to the store.

unclebunk
06-28-2013, 19:31
Hey guys. Still hoping to hear what thermometers you recommend for the smoker and your meat.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

TheNovaMan
06-28-2013, 22:08
If I could afford it, I'd have a Maverick ET-732. Because I can't, I used a laboratory thermometer to verify a thermometer taken off a junked gas grill, and I use one of those little (quarter sized at best) dial thermometers for the internal temp. I verified that one with room temp and boiling water.

stevegoz
06-30-2013, 20:02
Did four pounds of chicken wings for a small family gathering today. Pretty basic -- I toss the wings in some "wok oil" (for garlic and sesame flavor), then dump in some of my basic BBQ rub and shake 'til coated. Ran them in the Smokenator on the 27" Weber for a touch over two hours. Dang tasty as always, yep.

Outside of the Q realm...wife and I made a few small pizzas on the BGE at 700+ degrees last night. Pizza stone broke in two pieces under the stress of the heat. I'd been warned that not just any stone could take the kind of heat that the Egg generates, and this confirmed it. Better last night then some time when we're feeding a crowd -- time to buy a new, higher quality pizza stone.

TheNovaMan
06-30-2013, 20:26
Sounds tasty. I smoked baby backs on the smoker today; it was a practice run for the family get-together on the 4th of July. They came out alright, but I'm going to do a couple things differently on the 4th.

Happyhour24x7
07-01-2013, 03:21
A couple racks of St. Louis ribs yesterday, despite intermittent rain that started just as the fire got ready. And for unclebunk, I use a Maverick EC-732 for smoker temp and food temp for big chunks o meat, and a Thermoworks RT600N-C instant read for just about everything.

ratcheer
07-01-2013, 05:20
Lart night was those "country ribs" for me. I brined them for an hour, dry rubbed with Tony Chachere's, and roasted for an hour at 300 F (direct heat) in the Big Green Egg with hickory chunks added. Slathered with Stubbs sauce in the last minutes. They were some of the best I've made.

Tim

unclebunk
07-01-2013, 12:10
If I could afford it, I'd have a Maverick ET-732. Because I can't, I used a laboratory thermometer to verify a thermometer taken off a junked gas grill, and I use one of those little (quarter sized at best) dial thermometers for the internal temp. I verified that one with room temp and boiling water.


A couple racks of St. Louis ribs yesterday, despite intermittent rain that started just as the fire got ready. And for unclebunk, I use a Maverick EC-732 for smoker temp and food temp for big chunks o meat, and a Thermoworks RT600N-C instant read for just about everything.
Seems like that Maverick model is the way to go, supplemented by the Thermoworks instant read which I found for around $20. Thanks!

Happyhour24x7
07-03-2013, 02:45
Honestly, the Thermoworks changed-and improved-the way I cook everything; grill and kitchen.

MyOldKyDram
07-03-2013, 07:11
Got a few hours before the rain rolls in and stays for about a week, so going to put some short ribs on here in short order.

ETA: Oh, and as it relates to bourbon, there is bourbon sugar in the rub, being smoked w barrel char, and prob whip up a bourbon BBQ sauce to go with.

Old Dusty
07-03-2013, 10:33
Got a few hours before the rain rolls in and stays for about a week, so going to put some short ribs on here in short order.

ETA: Oh, and as it relates to bourbon, there is bourbon sugar in the rub, being smoked w barrel char, and prob whip up a bourbon BBQ sauce to go with.
do you sprinkle the char right on the coals?

MyOldKyDram
07-03-2013, 10:37
Sure you could, but I just use a smoker box for it. Smells so damned good.

MyOldKyDram
07-03-2013, 12:02
And almost eating time.

1592215923

WAINWRIGHT
07-03-2013, 17:21
Looks good,and where were these skills during the Sampler?Scott and Thad slaved away and I well.....drank a lot of beer.

MyOldKyDram
07-03-2013, 17:33
They appeared to have it well under control!

mbroo5880i
07-03-2013, 18:13
I cooked turkey burgers. Pretty sexy, huh? :lol:

p_elliott
07-04-2013, 08:53
Just thought I would throw in here when in KY and you're looking for Barrel char Barton's has it. They also have bung plugs I picked up both for a friend of mine and he says the plugs smoke better as you have to soak them in water first. He uses both together. He gave me some pulled pork he did with it but I haven't tried it yet.

Old Dusty
07-04-2013, 09:19
Just thought I would throw in here when in KY and you're looking for Barrel char Barton's has it. They also have bung plugs I picked up both for a friend of mine and he says the plugs smoke better as you have to soak them in water first. He uses both together. He gave me some pulled pork he did with it but I haven't tried it yet.

A buddy hooked me up with both as well. Haven't used them yet.

stevegoz
07-04-2013, 10:03
Just thought I would throw in here when in KY and you're looking for Barrel char Barton's has it. They also have bung plugs I picked up both for a friend of mine and he says the plugs smoke better as you have to soak them in water first. He uses both together. He gave me some pulled pork he did with it but I haven't tried it yet.

Thanks for the tip -- gonna have to try to pick some up!

MyOldKyDram
07-04-2013, 10:08
They generally sell it at Liquor Barns, too.

RVTsteve
07-04-2013, 10:15
Got the ribs going on the weber at around 10 (little behind schedule, but should work out).
Rigged my own "smokenator" with an old pizza pan and brownie pan, we'll see how it works. Happy 4th!
1593015929

Bourbon Boiler
07-04-2013, 10:43
Are the bungs at bartons used, and thus bourbon infused? I didn't pick one up, but I didn't remember them being from used barrels.

Old Dusty
07-04-2013, 15:24
Are the bungs at bartons used, and thus bourbon infused? I didn't pick one up, but I didn't remember them being from used barrels.

mine are definitely used, but they were a gift and can't say for sure from Barton's.

p_elliott
07-04-2013, 18:00
The ones from Barton are used.

Bourbon Boiler
07-04-2013, 20:54
Thanks. I'll pick up a handful next time through.

T Comp
07-06-2013, 13:44
Back on the 4th some Cuban marinated spatchcocked chickens and fresh Polish sausage from a local butcher came off the WSM (Apple wood) and made for some mighty fine eating. The pan of potatoes and onions soaking up the juice underneath the smoking birds didn't make the pic.
15938

stevegoz
07-07-2013, 11:21
I just took my third-ever beef brisket off of the Big Green Egg a half hour ago. I'm still working on stabilizing temps overnight; I had to restart the fire this morning after letting it get all the way down to 140 degrees on the grill level overnight. So many competing schools of thought out there on how best to do these smokes of over half a day....

tigerlam92
07-12-2013, 17:31
Just picked this Smoke Vault used earlier today, 5 month old, with cover and propane tank for $175. I'm very excited and threw some beef ribs and chicken to smoke, preped last night.

24" is quite big and loving it so far.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/07/13/y4u6upyb.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/07/13/ebute9y9.jpg

Cheers
Hugh

tigerlam92
07-12-2013, 20:20
Worked wonderfully.

Chicken stopped at 165F and was perfect. So juicy and tender.

Beef ribs, couldn't wait so took half out at 4hr which is early but still great. See picture of smoke ring.

The other half leaving it in for another 1-1.5 hr.

The smoke vault and the wireless thermometer worked great. The thermometer on the vault actually was quite accurate.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/07/13/6uga9aja.jpg

Cheers
Hugh

TheNovaMan
07-12-2013, 21:05
Mmmm, looks tasty! :yum:

MyOldKyDram
07-12-2013, 21:12
Damn that all looks great! Got some rubbed ribs in the fridge right now for smoking tomorrow. A weekend without rain woohoo!

stevegoz
07-18-2013, 09:06
I'm feeling brisketed out -- I've done four in the past six weeks. So this weekend I'll be doing my first boneless pork shoulder. (I know, I know -- should've gone bone-in. Costco gave me no choice!) I've got high hopes for it!

smokinjoe
07-21-2013, 08:17
Absolutely crushed a bone-in turkey breast last weekend on the WSM. Tender enough, you could cut it with a dull plastic knife. Going to try a whole turkey in the coming weeks, and if as successful, I'm sending the PITA deep-fryer on an overdue hiatus this Thanksgiving. Don't get me wrong, the turkey was always great out of the fryer, but set up and clean up was a major chore.

squire
07-21-2013, 10:01
Not to mention dangerous when mixed with alcohol.

bearmark
07-21-2013, 14:19
Today it was baby back ribs and brisket. The ribs were hard to cut because they fell off of the bone so easily. I was really pleased. The slab on the brisket was tender, but the wet brisket was super moist and smokey. I wished that I had some Brimstone to go with this! That was poor planning on my part.

stevegoz
07-21-2013, 14:45
My boneless pork shoulder proved to be highly forgiving. The grill-level temp in the BGE was around 270 degrees for most of the cook, and it still came out crazy tender and moist. Wish the packaging had been better labelled -- it turns out there were two separate hunks of meat in the package from Costco, which cut the cook time down significantly. Nothing like pulling the Bear Claws (http://www.amazon.com/kitchen-dining/dp/B003IWI66W) out at 4 am to shred up six pounds of meat....

mbroo5880i
08-04-2013, 18:59
More grilled than smoked but we had friends from Gurnee, IL in over the weekend. They are natives from Mexico. They grilled a traditional Mexican feast and it kicked a...

We had tacos with a cut of meat that I never had. It is called arrechara. Very similar to skirt steak but much more tender. It is grilled with spices and lime. Awesome! You eat it with a tortilla and add pico de gallo with Serrano peppers (much spicier than jalapenos). Probably not best with bourbon but awesome! You add Spanish rice, huge grilled green onions and grilled corn on the cob. You eat and then sleep. Some meals are better without bourbon. I waited until today to drink bourbon.

MyOldKyDram
08-18-2013, 09:55
Bunch of chicken for the week and some bone-in pork chops marinating in Cocoa Loco, Robert the Bruce, and other crap.

Happyhour24x7
08-19-2013, 03:16
Did a flat brisket Saturday and had some friends over for a whiskey tasting. Both went over well.

petrel800
08-20-2013, 14:05
This past weekend we did 3 racks of baby backs and 2 spatchcock chickens. All came out wonderfully.

stevegoz
08-23-2013, 21:53
Night of fitful sleep ahead -- I have a 7-pound pork butt and a 9-pound beef brisket going on the BGE at 230 degrees. If she runs hot and goes over 260 or peters out and drops below 200, the remote is gonna trigger an alarm....

ratcheer
08-24-2013, 06:45
I made some great pork chops. Started with the big, thick, boneless ones from Costco. Brined them with Kosher salt and sugar for an hour. Dried them and dry rubbed with Stubbs BBQ Rub. Added a large hickory chunk to the lump charcoal fire and seared for 16 minutes at about 400 F.

Made a sauce of 1 1/2 T melted butter, 3 oz of Rub Some Butt sauce (a commercial sweet mustard sauce), and 2 oz apple cider. Wrapped the chops in heavy duty foil with this sauce and roasted for about 40 minutes at about 350 F.

I hate to say it, but these were some of the best chops I have ever tasted. ;)

Tim

stevegoz
08-24-2013, 12:13
Dang the butt and brisket both turned out perfect -- shame our guests won't be here for another three hours! #TimingBBQaintEasy

ratcheer
08-25-2013, 04:25
A whole chicken (4 1/2 lbs) on the Big Green Egg last night. Upright with one of those wire stools up its butt. Indirect heat at 350 F for 1 hr 45 min. A hickory chunk on the fire. Damn, I am getting good at this.

Tim

squire
08-25-2013, 10:40
Tim did you use a rub on that?

troyce
08-25-2013, 14:55
The Big Green Egg and a Thermapen thermometer have made me an amazing cook. I've been on a roll -can't fail.
This is after over 40 yrs of mishaps.

DeanSheen
08-25-2013, 19:13
The Big Green Egg and a Thermapen thermometer have made me an amazing cook. I've been on a roll -can't fail.
This is after over 40 yrs of mishaps.

Wow. I better go buy one of those things.

ratcheer
08-26-2013, 05:28
Tim did you use a rub on that?

Yes. I used a mixed rub of half McCormick's Montreal Seasoning for Chicken and half Tony Chachere's Creole Seasoning. Inside the chicken and outside.

@Troyce - I don't even have a ThermoPen. I just follow the instructions (often from Steven Raichlen's books) and most things still come out perfect.

Tim

Josh
08-26-2013, 06:39
I've tried some new things on the smoker myself recently. The first one that turned out really well were duck leg quarters. They're not as meaty as the breasts but much cheaper. I brined them and then rubbed them with a Rogan Josh curry powder. I then scored the skin and smoked them skin side down over a mix of apple and mesquite. They turned out really great. Even my wife who doesn't normally like duck thought they were great.

The other notable new (to me) smoker material was a tri-tip roast. I rubbed it with cajun seasoning and Ancho chili powder and then smoked it over mesquite for 6-7 hours I think. I then stuck in in the fridge for a couple days. Then yesterday I got it up to room temp and then seared it in a steel pan all around. Turned out great. Perfectly Medium rare on the inside with a nice crust on the outside. Served it with home made blue potato fries. It was a great meal and I even have some left over for a sandwich today!

ratcheer
08-27-2013, 04:39
@josh, I have heard a lot about the tri-tips, but I have yet to see one. I don't go to a lot of stores, but I do go to a fairly "high end" store. Maybe I should ask them about it again.

Tim

Old Dusty
08-27-2013, 04:47
It's a Cali thing. I believe it's from the sirloin but back this way they cut it into different pieces. I've done them before and it can be a delicious cut and pretty forgiving to work with. If you've got a good butcher they can cut it for you or order it. Give it a shot.

Edit: if you get one google "Santa Maria Tri-Tip" for cooking tips.

Josh
08-27-2013, 09:01
@josh, I have heard a lot about the tri-tips, but I have yet to see one. I don't go to a lot of stores, but I do go to a fairly "high end" store. Maybe I should ask them about it again.

Tim


It's a Cali thing. I believe it's from the sirloin but back this way they cut it into different pieces. I've done them before and it can be a delicious cut and pretty forgiving to work with. If you've got a good butcher they can cut it for you or order it. Give it a shot.

Edit: if you get one google "Santa Maria Tri-Tip" for cooking tips. I got mine at Trader Joe's. They seem to always have some, maybe because the company is based in California. According to their website, the closest locations to Pelham, AL are in Atlanta, so it might be best to use the suggestion Old Dusty made.

stevegoz
09-02-2013, 13:39
Left the BGE in the garage today and opted instead to use a Weber-Smokenator combo to do up some baby backs. Three hours in, they're looking great....

Old Dusty
10-03-2013, 15:31
Bourbon=FR 2013 1B LE
Food= boneless pork tenderloin slathered in spicy mustard and coated with Weber BBQ rub
Fire=weeknight so seared then roasted on the Genesis.

petrel800
11-03-2013, 20:28
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/11/04/2enymyda.jpg

Pulled the egg out for a frenched rack of lamb. Used a Dijon mustard based spread of garlic, salt, pepper, and rosemary to coat the rack. Got the egg up to temp, seared all sides and pulled the rack. Got the egg to indirect temp of 400 and roasted the rack to 130 internal temp. Rested for 5 minutes. Perfect Med Rare.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk (http://tapatalk.com/m?id=1)

Old Dusty
11-04-2013, 03:58
Nicely done! Great advert for the BGE.

onemorepour
11-05-2013, 03:03
Just discovered this thread and lovin it, might motivate me to finally get a kamado style cooker.
I have been makin do with a combo spit/charcoal grill that Ive retrofitted with a lid to make a basic smoker, works well enough for simple stuff.

Smoked up some homegrown cherry tomatoes and oysters on the weekend over a combination of rosemary and redgum. Cooked the tomatoes indirectly for about half an hour before throwing the soaked wood/rosemary on along with the oysters for 10mins of smoking. Served up on rye bread with a splash or extravirgin olive oil and a glass of sherry. Tomatoes were great, almost whisky like!

DPPSmoker
11-05-2013, 16:51
@josh, I have heard a lot about the tri-tips, but I have yet to see one. I don't go to a lot of stores, but I do go to a fairly "high end" store. Maybe I should ask them about it again.

TimAs Dusty said in a previous post, tri-tips are a Cali thing. They smoke and grill them out there like they are going out of style. I had the same problem with locating tri-tip in Michigan. The one place I could find it, it cost $8 per pound. I love tri-tip but not at $8 per pound. A year ago, I got a membership to Costco and they had tri-tip at $5 per pound. I bought a case. When I got it home, I vacuum sealed one or two tri-tips per package and put them in the freezer. One of my best buys ever. My kids devour tri-tip. It's easy for them to cut and there is next to no fat for them to cut around. Best of all, it has a great beef flavor whether you grill or smoke it.

rndenks
11-07-2013, 05:22
My local butcher sells tri-tips, and he marinates them in a "black nugget" marinade. I sear them on my grill (4-5 min. on each side), and then toss it on the other side of the grill away from the flame for about 20 min. This is a great tasting piece of meat. I never thought to try it on my smoker though. Thanks for the idea!

tigerlam92
11-29-2013, 10:18
Two turkeys, one from yesterday turned out great and one smoking now in the Camp Chef Vault.

I did use a marinade, then injection and finally on the Camp Chef roaster while smoking to get internal to 145C. At the party, a final 45 min at 400C with skin buttered to heat and crisp before serving.

bjhowell
11-29-2013, 17:20
Did the thanksgiving turkey in the smoker as usual. Brined it for about 12 hours first. Also did a bacon explosion in the smoker.

stevegoz
12-02-2013, 13:19
We salted ("dry brined") our 14-pound fresh bird and then smoke roasted it on the BGE with pecan wood during our Saturday T-giving celebration. Also did a five-pound beef tenderloin on the Weber kettle with rotisserie. Both turned out great. Much better grilling weather in the Chicago area then if we'd had the family over on the actual holiday.

petrel800
06-29-2014, 15:33
Was reading through some of the posts looking for some inspiration, saw the tri tip discussion and decided to have a go. Headed over to trader joes grabbed 2 smaller roasts. Did one with garlic salt and black pepper, the other with a dizzy dust beef rub. BGE with some pecan and mesquite smoke. Reverse sear method, indirect 250, pulled them at 125 internal, wrapped in foil while the grill got hot for a direct sear. About 2 minutes a side direct after ter the fire got going.

Overall, very impressed, very flavorful cut of meat. Garlic salt and pepper won out over the rub, but both were great. I'd recommend trying one if you haven't.

tanstaafl2
06-29-2014, 15:38
Was reading through some of the posts looking for some inspiration, saw the tri tip discussion and decided to have a go. Headed over to trader joes grabbed 2 smaller roasts. Did one with garlic salt and black pepper, the other with a dizzy dust beef rub. BGE with some pecan and mesquite smoke. Reverse sear method, indirect 250, pulled them at 125 internal, wrapped in foil while the grill got hot for a direct sear. About 2 minutes a side direct after ter the fire got going.

Overall, very impressed, very flavorful cut of meat. Garlic salt and pepper won out over the rub, but both were great. I'd recommend trying one if you haven't.

Good to hear they turned out well!

Old Dusty
06-29-2014, 17:25
Was reading through some of the posts looking for some inspiration, saw the tri tip discussion and decided to have a go. Headed over to trader joes grabbed 2 smaller roasts. Did one with garlic salt and black pepper, the other with a dizzy dust beef rub. BGE with some pecan and mesquite smoke. Reverse sear method, indirect 250, pulled them at 125 internal, wrapped in foil while the grill got hot for a direct sear. About 2 minutes a side direct after ter the fire got going.

Overall, very impressed, very flavorful cut of meat. Garlic salt and pepper won out over the rub, but both were great. I'd recommend trying one if you haven't.

I know the "seal in the juices" theory of early sear has been debunked, but I just can't bring myself to do the reverse sear. Got to get over the fear and just do it.

BootsOnTheGround
06-29-2014, 17:31
Was reading through some of the posts looking for some inspiration, saw the tri tip discussion and decided to have a go. Headed over to trader joes grabbed 2 smaller roasts. Did one with garlic salt and black pepper, the other with a dizzy dust beef rub. BGE with some pecan and mesquite smoke. Reverse sear method, indirect 250, pulled them at 125 internal, wrapped in foil while the grill got hot for a direct sear. About 2 minutes a side direct after ter the fire got going.

Overall, very impressed, very flavorful cut of meat. Garlic salt and pepper won out over the rub, but both were great. I'd recommend trying one if you haven't.

Think I'm going to try this. But why pecan? Where do you find it?

And TJ's meat frightens me so your positive experience does help.

petrel800
06-29-2014, 18:32
I know the "seal in the juices" theory of early sear has been debunked, but I just can't bring myself to do the reverse sear. Got to get over the fear and just do it.

As long as the cut is reasonably thick, reverse sear in my opinion is the only way to go. Unless of Couse you've got restaurant quality equipment at your house. As long as you have a good thermometer to monitor the low temperature part of the cook and pull it about 10 degrees before your desired done-ness, you'll be fine.

Here's a solid article on it . . .

http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/cooking_temperatures_and_reverse_sear.html

petrel800
06-29-2014, 18:39
Think I'm going to try this. But why pecan? Where do you find it?

And TJ's meat frightens me so your positive experience does help.

Pecan burns a little cooler and adds a similar fruity flavor without the sweetness like apple or cherry in my opinion. It works really well with poultry, fish, and it did pretty well on the beef when mixed with the mesquite. I get chunks of it at the local ace hardware.

As for Trader Joes, I don't shop there often, never really bought meat there before either, but the tri tip in the south isn't exactly a popular cut like it is out west, so it was the only place local that I had a reasonable guarantee they would have them in stock. That being said, both were nice cuts, well trimmed and marbled. Next time with some more lead time I may call the local butcher as they didn't have any cuts over 2 lbs which is why I bought 2. I would have rather done 1 larger, but it worked out fine. That being said, the TJ meat was good, no issues going back for more for me.

smokinjoe
06-29-2014, 19:58
Pecan burns a little cooler and adds a similar fruity flavor without the sweetness like apple or cherry in my opinion. It works really well with poultry, fish, and it did pretty well on the beef when mixed with the mesquite. I get chunks of it at the local ace hardware.

As for Trader Joes, I don't shop there often, never really bought meat there before either, but the tri tip in the south isn't exactly a popular cut like it is out west, so it was the only place local that I had a reasonable guarantee they would have them in stock. That being said, both were nice cuts, well trimmed and marbled. Next time with some more lead time I may call the local butcher as they didn't have any cuts over 2 lbs which is why I bought 2. I would have rather done 1 larger, but it worked out fine. That being said, the TJ meat was good, no issues going back for more for me.

I did a tri tip a few months ago from Trader Joes, and it was wonderful. Like what you saw Mark, it was smaller than what I was looking for, but very tasty.

callmeox
06-30-2014, 04:53
The kid was out in Sacramento for a couple turns in Americorps and he fell in love with tri-tip out there. We haven't found a butcher in our area who will carve one for us, so its good to know that TJ's will do it.

rndenks
07-01-2014, 11:53
The kid was out in Sacramento for a couple turns in Americorps and he fell in love with tri-tip out there. We haven't found a butcher in our area who will carve one for us, so its good to know that TJ's will do it.

There is a local butcher near me that sells a tri-tip marinated in a black nugget marinade. It is unbelievable. Let me know if you make it to the Southwest suburbs of Cleveland, and I will give you the name, address and phone.

BootsOnTheGround
07-01-2014, 13:26
All TJ's meat is private label for them (CO, NE or CA?) and comes in these weird puffy trays. Watch the exp date on it because who knows how long it was sitting in transition, in some warehouse, truck, stockroom, etc. Their fish is definitely a pass.

I've done tri tip before but I didn't have an Egg at the time. Thanks for the motivation on it. I have a ton of apple but no pecan. Always looking to try something new.

Josh
07-01-2014, 13:40
TJ's Tri-tips and the other steaks are sold in vacuum packs, at least around here.

smokinjoe
07-01-2014, 14:21
TJ's Tri-tips and the other steaks are sold in vacuum packs, at least around here.

Same here (at least the tri-tip) was.

BootsOnTheGround
07-01-2014, 17:51
Check that, you guys are right. It's the other stuff they sell like brats or steaks that gets the puffy tray treatment.

Harry in WashDC
07-01-2014, 18:02
TJ's Tri-tips and the other steaks are sold in vacuum packs, at least around here.

Yup. TJs in WashDC, too, have tri-tips. If they don't have it, ask. They can accommodate. But, in my experience, so can Wegmans if you are lucky enough to be near one. FWIW, using a 22.5" Weber with a Smokenator insert, this year I've done tri-tips, a beef brisket (even though I had to get up at OMG 6AM to start it which is way too early to drink), Baltimore pit beef, and of course spare ribs. The tri-tips were a nice change from "ordinary" grilling/smoking.

petrel800
09-03-2014, 11:22
Pulled the egg out this weekend for some ribs. 2 Slabs of Baby Backs (vacuum packed ones from Costco, so convenient-pre prepped, no membrane, just open, rinse and rub), put the extra slab in the freezer for a later date. Cut each slab in half to make the positioning on the egg easier. 225 degrees for the first 3 hours and about 250 for the last 2.5. Local grocery store had Jack Daniels Barrel Chunks on close out, so bought a bag to try them out. Got a grooved Sinatra barrel chunck in my bag, definitely tossed that one in the fire because it was special :lol:.

Used Strickland's Pork rub on one slab and Butt Rub on the other. Served one half of each dry and the other halves got sauced and put back on the egg for 15 minutes.

Ribs turned out nice, the Jack Daniel's chunks did all right, but in my opinion didn't really add anything special to the process. Probably why they were on closeout.

GerryM
09-03-2014, 14:18
Pulled the egg out this weekend for some ribs. 2 Slabs of Baby Backs (vacuum packed ones from Costco, so convenient-pre prepped, no membrane, just open, rinse and rub), put the extra slab in the freezer for a later date. Cut each slab in half to make the positioning on the egg easier. 225 degrees for the first 3 hours and about 250 for the last 2.5. Local grocery store had Jack Daniels Barrel Chunks on close out, so bought a bag to try them out. Got a grooved Sinatra barrel chunck in my bag, definitely tossed that one in the fire because it was special :lol:.

Used Strickland's Pork rub on one slab and Butt Rub on the other. Served one half of each dry and the other halves got sauced and put back on the egg for 15 minutes.

Ribs turned out nice, the Jack Daniel's chunks did all right, but in my opinion didn't really add anything special to the process. Probably why they were on closeout.

I buy the same ribs from Costco but cook all three racks at once since my family seems to inhale them. I use an offset barrel smoker and use a mostly apple wood with a little hickory. I make my own basic rub an usually two sauces with one being a mustard/vinegar base. If anyone has a good bourbon based sauce I'd like to try one this weekend.

My favorite is smoking a packer brisket of 14-16lbs, yummy, nothing beats it! It feeds an army

KyleCBreese
10-20-2014, 10:31
I thought about taking the corks from empty bottles and throwing them in my smoker (just the cork portion, cutting off any plastic or finished wood pieces). I figured since they were whiskey soaked they might add some flavor. Has anyone ever tried this?

Harry in WashDC
10-20-2014, 11:27
I thought about taking the corks from empty bottles and throwing them in my smoker (just the cork portion, cutting off any plastic or finished wood pieces). I figured since they were whiskey soaked they might add some flavor. Has anyone ever tried this?

Did it with red wine corks once. Kind of sooty and hot and not much flavor/aroma.

unclebunk
10-22-2014, 08:41
I brined a bunch of bone-in pork chops that I picked up at Costco and grilled them five minutes each side on the Weber and they came out absolutely fantastic. Can't wait to reheat one of those babies for lunch today!

jvd99
10-24-2014, 05:56
I also go with Costco ribs exclusively on the smoker. My cousins & I have come in top 10 the last 2 years in the amateur division of a nearby annual KCBS event using Costco ribs and our dry rub. If any of you guys have the opportunity to enter a competition, do it b/c its just a great time. Lots of bourbon & beer consumed starting very early in the morning ;) However, Mrs. JVD99 has to arrange for transportation home b/c no one on the team is in any condition to do anything except nap after the event.

Paul W
10-24-2014, 09:25
I was not aware that Costco ribs come with the membrane already removed. That is a major selling point, since I find taking off the membrane to be a PITA.

I am suitably inspired. I will drop by Costco on the way home today for some ribs and plan on firing up the offset smoker early tomorrow.

Thanks for the inspiration. Just another way my bourbon obsession is benefiting those around me (principally my wife and kids who, experience has shown, will eat an unlimited amount of ribs.)

jvd99
10-24-2014, 10:28
The lack of membrane is a really nice aspect of the Costco ribs, makes prep at home and especially at a competition so much easier.

dcbt
10-24-2014, 11:05
I'm actually having ribs tonight, but gonna stop on the way home to pick them up. Ribs are one thing I've quit trying; it's better for me to leave that to the professionals I've learned.