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View Full Version : Coming down from "Whiskey Snobbery"



boss302
07-26-2012, 23:36
I'm not sure how everyone else feels, but I'm thankful for the tips I've received from Straightbourbon.com regarding tasty Bourbon, Scotch, Irish, Straight Rye, and even Tennessee whiskeys.

But I've noticed recently that my palate has been moving from the complex to the simplistic. For example, the whiskey I've been drinking almost every day is the $15/btl George Dickel No. 8. That doesn't mean that I don't appreciate more flavorful, more complex whiskeys, like Four Roses Small Batch or Black Maple Hill, or Bulleit Rye. But, when I finish a 9-hour bartending shift, I find myself craving something simple and honest, like Dickel No. 8 and the music of Tom Petty.

Anyone else with me here?

Happyhour24x7
07-27-2012, 02:58
Yes, there are certainly times when I pass right by the various high proof and high end bottles and grab something easy drinking and light.

OscarV
07-27-2012, 04:58
Of course.
There are situations for everything.
All depends on mood and enviroment.
For example I love a good micro IPA like Founders Double Trouble.
But I also like a good cheeseburger and a cold Bud.

darylld911
07-27-2012, 05:21
Agree - all depends on my mood. I love EWB, and think that is a great drink for the money (better than JB White or JD black IMHO). If I want smooth, I'll grab MM. While I'm trying to whittle my collection down to something like 25 bottles, I absolutely intend to keep some from across the spectrum. If I only drank the high end stuff . . . I'd have to adjust my monthly budget (and if I'm that tired at the end of the day, I probably don't appreciate the complexity of something nice).

sailor22
07-27-2012, 06:31
Compare it to music.
What's the best rock and roll song ever recorded? No single answer is possible - it's the same with whiskey. There is a time and place for most whiskies and there is a time when simple and delicious fits the moment perfectly.
We "play" our whiskies the same way a good DJ plays the right cut for the moment.

unclebunk
07-27-2012, 06:35
I'm in a similar boat. Though I still appreciate and love my top shelf pours, my buying habits have come full circle and I now tend to seek out the quality "value" bourbons in the sub-$35 dollar range. That gives me quite a range to choose from (VOB, Rittenhouse BIB, WT101, OGD114, FRSmB and a slew of other fine whiskies) and doesn't break the bank. That's why I always tell new-comers not to head straight for the top shelf when quality whiskey can be found down around knee-high in your favorite liquor store.

Bourbon Boiler
07-27-2012, 13:42
My "sweet spot" has always been between $30 - $55 retail. I have traditionally thought that the step up in quality to this level from $20 was tremendous, and the the advancement in quality when reaching for a $80 bottle was present but much more subtle. I now finding myself more likely to go lower than higher, but that's probably because I've really been able to focus on 2-3 cheaper products that I really enjoy. 1792, EC12, and KC can fill about 70% of my whiskey cravings.

Clavius
07-27-2012, 16:36
I'm afraid that I've gotten bored with bourbon, to be honest. I hope it's just temporary because it's the middle of summer. But I've just lost the enthusiasm for seeking out rare bottles and bunkering them and all that jazz. I just want to drink some decent bourbon that doesn't cost an arm and a leg and is readily available. I don't see myself hunting for PVW/BTAC this fall. For sure, it's good stuff. I'm just tired of all the nonsense required to get some. And hell, I work in a liquor store!

MyOldKyDram
07-27-2012, 16:50
Gotta agree with those who say its all about finding the right one for othe mood you're in.

Some nights an $11 bottle will suit me just fine. Some nights it's considerably pricier than that.

And some nights (such as this) it's every stop in between. :grin:

LongBeachScott
07-27-2012, 17:02
I certainly have lowbrow bourbon evenings. I have bottles in every price range. I usually purchase the under $15 bottles for the purpose of making cocktails or cooking, but there are some nights I want a pour of something I don't have to pay attention to. Fighting Cock usually costs me about $16 or so and I have always found it to be pretty nice for the price.

ebo
07-27-2012, 18:25
Compare it to music.
What's the best rock and roll song ever recorded? No single answer is possible - it's the same with whiskey. There is a time and place for most whiskies and there is a time when simple and delicious fits the moment perfectly.
We "play" our whiskies the same way a good DJ plays the right cut for the moment.
That's a great analogy. I'm into all different kinds of music, but sometimes I just really enjoy a little AC/DC.... simple, hard rocking, fun music; same goes for whisk(e)y.

ethangsmith
07-27-2012, 19:51
Yep, a good 80% of what I have in the cabinet at any time is less than $30 a bottle. Heck, usually half is even under $20. I guess I'm a cheap whiskey guy. It's still tasty though!

ratcheer
07-28-2012, 04:54
I have been there for quite a while, boss302. While I still have several very fancy bottlings bunkered and even a couple open, about all I buy anymore are WT 101 and OGD 86.

Tim

Flyfish
07-28-2012, 07:29
It seems to me, taking a "step up" doesn't necessarily require paying more. A neighbor, who only drinks good ole JD, stopped by while I was enjoying a pour of OWA. So, I got another Glencairn and poured him some. His eye lit up at the nose even before he took a sip. I suggested that if he really liked Tennessee sippin' whiskey, he should give Dickel a try. He had never heard of OWA--which is not surprising because we can't get it in Ohio. But he had never heard of Dickel either. Both OWA and GD are way better than JD (IMHO) but are in the same price range.

ebo
07-28-2012, 07:33
Regular purchases are WT 101, GD #12, EC 12, OGD BiB, and FRSB (not really a low budget pour, but I have to have it!) :grin:

bllygthrd
07-28-2012, 09:56
I have always enjoyed finding a quality pour at a valued price [VOV BIB]. But, you have to be willing to try the valued brands to find the ones you like/value. There are certainly times for cracking open a premium pour, usually when they add to the event being celebrated.

ratcheer
07-29-2012, 11:23
I have always enjoyed finding a quality pour at a valued price [VOV BIB]. But, you have to be willing to try the valued brands to find the ones you like/value. There are certainly times for cracking open a premium pour, usually when they add to the event being celebrated.

Exactly. Special whiskies are for special occasions. If you drink them all the time, then when you need something special, there isn't anything.

Tim

Bourbon Boiler
07-29-2012, 19:52
I have always enjoyed finding a quality pour at a valued price [VOV BIB]. But, you have to be willing to try the valued brands to find the ones you like/value. There are certainly times for cracking open a premium pour, usually when they add to the event being celebrated.

I think your second sentence is the most important. I know there are several $20 - $30 pours I like, but if I were given a random sampling of all the whiskeys in this price range that existed I'd probably be satisfied with the value of less than half.

mosugoji64
07-29-2012, 22:05
The only way to really know if you prefer bottle X over Y at any price is with a blind tasting, or as I like to call it, The Great Equalizer. We're too often lured by factors other than the whiskey alone. I'm no exception. Good stuff is good stuff, but sometimes other things get in the way. :rolleyes:

p_elliott
07-30-2012, 07:58
I have a lot of premium bottles but I reach for WT 101 most of the time.

IowaJeff
07-30-2012, 08:59
I have a few bottles I would consider 'premium' for my purposes and most are open, but I usually pour from the bottles in the $20-$30 range (WT101, EWSB, BT, etc.) I'm starting to get even less 'snobbish' than that and am working in some cheaper bottles, like HH, and EWB. I've enjoyed a lot in that price range too and will probably continue to buy more.

MauiSon
07-30-2012, 14:44
I'm not sure I agree with the tenor of this thread. Snobbery has nothing at all to do with price. It is about flouting others lacking 'inner circle' opinions or experiences. I've only noticed it through the paucity of posts in certain threads on the forum. It doesn't appear to be much of a problem here - mostly good folk with firm opinions.

If some prefer to drink high-priced whiskey on a regular basis (don't we wish we all could), they don't appear to suggest we all ought to do likewise. More often, it seems they want to share their bounty when finding new sources of enjoyment. It's not snobbish to refuse to drink something that doesn't appeal to you, it's snobbish to refuse to drink with someone who doesn't share your epicurean attainments. ;)

OscarV
07-30-2012, 16:09
Hear hear!
You nailed it MauiSon.
Snobbery is a two-way street.
Both Blue Bloods (i.e. Charles on M*A*S*H TV show) and Tailer Trash (i.e. Gretchen Wilson's song "Redneck Woman) can be snobs.

Gillman
07-30-2012, 16:45
In my view, snobbery is disdaining something that might be of value because it doesn't fit your preconceptions of what is good, valid, or "approved". As the last posters have recognized, snobbery can exist on all parts of the social scale. If you reject something because it isn't part of your world, you can't learn anything further.

Snobbery has no place in the world of drink or anywhere, IMO. Knowledge does though. Knowledge is good. But it shouldn't be used to put something down, because it becomes anti-knowledge.

I don't like 36 month old bourbon that has a strong corn taste. I don't like it because I think it doesn't taste very good, not because of what it costs. Everyone is entitled to like what they want of course, including me. By the same token, I don't like most bourbon older than 10-12 years. I don't care how much it costs. I think the very high prices fetched for it aren't justified usually (there are exceptions). Some people disagree, fine, since again we all have our own taste. But if someone tells me a whiskey is inherently great because it costs $80.00 or more, well, I just can't accept that.

Knowledge is good, again. It's information filtered though a certain sensibility. But rejecting something simply because of what it costs just never made any sense to me, just as embracing it for what it costs doesn't either.

Case in point: one of the best bourbons I've had this year cost $18.00, it's Triple A. I spent almost $80.00 for a 4RSB (the 2012 limited edition) that was certainly good but no better IMO than most 4RSBs I've had. Enough said.

Gary

unclebunk
07-31-2012, 10:10
Nice post (as usual), Gary. It really does come down to personal preferences and, as another member pointed out yesterday, blind tastings really are the way to bust the myths surrounding some of the highest priced bourbons on the shelf. I always marvel at how much perception plays in our enjoyment of fine spirits and how often inexpensive bottles mop the floor with the so-called "classics."

OscarV
07-31-2012, 10:21
Case in point: one of the best bourbons I've had this year cost $18.00, it's Triple A. I spent almost $80.00 for a 4RSB (the 2012 limited edition) that was certainly good but no better IMO than most 4RSBs I've had. Enough said.

Gary



It's not snobbery just personal taste.
For example at $18.00 I will pass on the AAA, to me it's not worth it.
I bought 4 bottles of 4R1B 2012 LE at $75.00 each and I wish I had bought more because I feel it's a bargain.

KYPayne
08-02-2012, 09:11
Personally, I prefer whiskey higher on the proof scale. I enjoy the thick mouth feel and to an extent the fire that underpins all the flavors. I seldom add water to whiskey because from my experience it deadens some flavors and brings out others, creating a balance different from the original drink, and the original flavor profile is why I'm drinking a particular whiskey to begin with. That being said, anytime I go out for dinner with friends and someone suggests that we order drinks, someone will almost undeniably complain of their cocktail being "too strong." My experiences with high proof whiskey and just drinking whiskey in general has led to my wanting the untainted, raw taste of the spirit in question: tequila, gin, vodka (for what it's worth), or whiskey. My preferences for stiff drinks and neat whiskey lend themselves to an air of snobbery.

That's kind of off topic, but it goes hand in hand with seldom drinkers' perceptions of spirits.

Kyjd75
08-02-2012, 11:22
It's not snobbery just personal taste.
For example at $18.00 I will pass on the AAA, to me it's not worth it.
I bought 4 bottles of 4R1B 2012 LE at $75.00 each and I wish I had bought more because I feel it's a bargain.

Personal taste is what it's all about. I love AAA 10 yr., but I also think the 2012 4R1B LE might just be the best bourbon I've ever had.

Gillman
08-02-2012, 12:11
Fair enough, and I agree with Oscar too that it is all down to taste. I am simply saying, if someone says a whiskey has to be good just because it costs a lot (or vice versa) I don't agree with that and I think few here would. Many people do though choose spirits on that basis, I suppose it's a kind of shorthand, for people who don't want to take the time to study it. Snobbery is probably too strong a word in fact, but I'm thinking of people e.g. who feel Johnny Walker Blue is great simply because it is expensive and has a luxury packaging, well I don't agree with that. (It's a good whisky, but others in the line-up are better value IMO, notably the Gold). We all have interests in some areas more than others and I suppose if you really analyse it, price and package are one way to ensure to the casual buyer a certain minimum quality; and therefore snobbery, which has negative connotations to some, is again probably too strong a word. But as in any field where people acquire knowledge (cars, computers or anything else) if you take the time to learn about it, you can often do better than the standard in its class.

Just another point is that each bottle really can be different. I've had Triple A I wouldn't buy again, and some I've really liked. Perhaps that's even true of the 4RSB Limited Edition 2012, but the one I happened to have struck me as pretty typical of 4RSB. I loved the anniversary 17 year old bottling, that was amazing. But every bottle can differ and I almost always look at them now as individual buys if you see what I mean...

Gary

BourbonJoe
08-02-2012, 18:32
I simply look at it from this perspective, having drunk a LOT of bourbons in my time. You can buy Good cheap bourbon but you can't buy Great cheap bourbon.
Joe :usflag:

bad_scientist
08-02-2012, 19:28
I'm a big fan of Ezra Brooks 90 proof. While I wanted to like other cheap bourbons - OF Signature, HH BiB, even Beam Black - I just couldn't get into them in the end. EB, on the other hand, I have trouble not picking whenever I want a glass of whiskey.

I've noticed that my current bottle is very, very different from my last one. The last one was dry and creamy, and this new one is sweet, a bit woody, and has a bit of rye spice. I love both profiles.

Anyway, my friends see me drinking this and OGD BiB and they think all I drink is crap. When they blanch, I tell them, oh, it's not so bad, and give them PVW15 or an old SW. They think they're rotgut, too! It goes to show the power of suggestion. I could pour VVOF into a cheap-looking bottle and all I'd get would be winces.

CoMobourbon
08-03-2012, 15:53
I simply look at it from this perspective, having drunk a LOT of bourbons in my time. You can buy Good cheap bourbon but you can't buy Great cheap bourbon.
Joe :usflag:

True. But, in my limited experience, great bourbon is almost never so much better than good bourbon that it is worth its exponentially higher price tag.

Think of it this way. Great bourbon is better than good bourbon, but good bourbon is EXPONENTIALLY better than no bourbon. So when great bourbon is EXPONENTIALLY more expensive than good bourbon but only somewhat better, I will reach for the good stuff every time in order to avoid the no-bourbon dilemma. Even if the the great bourbon is better, and often it is, I would still get ripped off shelling out 3x-10x more money.

Of course, when I am older and richer and have cash burning holes in my pocket, this good bourbon vs. 0 bourbon issue will probably mean nothing and my attitude about great bourbon will change accordingly. Until then, though, I say "power to you up there, but I think I'll stay down here on the low-mid shelf".

CoMobourbon
08-03-2012, 16:19
It goes to show the power of suggestion.

Now that is absolutely true.

JPBoston
08-05-2012, 12:57
I'm a big fan of Ezra Brooks 90 proof. While I wanted to like other cheap bourbons - OF Signature, HH BiB, even Beam Black - I just couldn't get into them in the end. EB, on the other hand, I have trouble not picking whenever I want a glass of whiskey.

I've noticed that my current bottle is very, very different from my last one. The last one was dry and creamy, and this new one is sweet, a bit woody, and has a bit of rye spice. I love both profiles.

Anyway, my friends see me drinking this and OGD BiB and they think all I drink is crap. When they blanch, I tell them, oh, it's not so bad, and give them PVW15 or an old SW. They think they're rotgut, too! It goes to show the power of suggestion. I could pour VVOF into a cheap-looking bottle and all I'd get would be winces.

Hahaha, great story.... and well in-line with your screen name. :)

I also live in the lower mid-shelf range (price-wise). Stuff like OWA, BT, OGD BIB, and EC12. Knob Creek seems to be my favorite so far, at $27. I've stayed away from the Van Winkles and higher priced bourbons just to avoid getting caught up in it. EWB has been my favorite, standard cheap pour.

My birthday is in November, so maybe that will be a good excuse to try to find a Pappy Van Winkle. :)

ebo
08-06-2012, 17:32
True. But, in my limited experience, great bourbon is almost never so much better than good bourbon that it is worth its exponentially higher price tag.

Think of it this way. Great bourbon is better than good bourbon, but good bourbon is EXPONENTIALLY better than no bourbon. So when great bourbon is EXPONENTIALLY more expensive than good bourbon but only somewhat better, I will reach for the good stuff every time in order to avoid the no-bourbon dilemma. Even if the the great bourbon is better, and often it is, I would still get ripped off shelling out 3x-10x more money.

Of course, when I am older and richer and have cash burning holes in my pocket, this good bourbon vs. 0 bourbon issue will probably mean nothing and my attitude about great bourbon will change accordingly. Until then, though, I say "power to you up there, but I think I'll stay down here on the low-mid shelf".

:toast:
............

StraightNoChaser
08-09-2012, 16:01
Can't say I'm in on this train. After all the amazing whiskey I've had everything else just tastes plain bad. I'll keep drinking the good juice only :D

Young Blacksmith
08-10-2012, 05:06
aaw, come on, you enjoyed that old antique! :) Honestly though, I'm a whiskey whore. If it says whiskey on the bottle I'll give it a fair shake, and see how it settles out. Yes, there have been bourbons I've poured down the drain, and more that I mixed with a little bitters and ginger ale, but on the whole I like whiskey too much to be snobby.

mosugoji64
08-10-2012, 08:34
aaw, come on, you enjoyed that old antique! :) Honestly though, I'm a whiskey whore. If it says whiskey on the bottle I'll give it a fair shake, and see how it settles out. Yes, there have been bourbons I've poured down the drain, and more that I mixed with a little bitters and ginger ale, but on the whole I like whiskey too much to be snobby.

I'm with you there. I'm always up for trying new bottles and am sometimes surprised by unexpected gems about which I wasn't initially excited.

As far as price goes, for me price is only one factor in the value of the whiskey. If price were the only factor, I wouldn't drink anything but HH 6yr BIB since it's $10/bottle here. Finding a bottle that is 2, 3, or 4 times as good to justify the added expense is difficult. If a sip of any particular whiskey makes me think, "Oh yeah, that was worth it," then it was. Barrel-proof bottles tend to justify their prices for me in that I get twice as many pours out of them. Either I water them down or linger over them at full strength over the course of an evening. That said, there are some bottles that are prohibitively expensive for me, but then that's what SB parties are for. :grin:

unclebunk
08-10-2012, 09:02
I'm a big fan of Ezra Brooks 90 proof. While I wanted to like other cheap bourbons - OF Signature, HH BiB, even Beam Black - I just couldn't get into them in the end. EB, on the other hand, I have trouble not picking whenever I want a glass of whiskey.

I've noticed that my current bottle is very, very different from my last one. The last one was dry and creamy, and this new one is sweet, a bit woody, and has a bit of rye spice. I love both profiles.

Anyway, my friends see me drinking this and OGD BiB and they think all I drink is crap. When they blanch, I tell them, oh, it's not so bad, and give them PVW15 or an old SW. They think they're rotgut, too! It goes to show the power of suggestion. I could pour VVOF into a cheap-looking bottle and all I'd get would be winces.

Man, ain't that the truth! Because I have so much more bourbon on hand than all of my friends, over time every one of them has become a critic. So even if I give them something special (which they invariably know absolutely nothing about) they start spouting off about "this one's too astringent" and "that one's got too much burn." And I'm thinking, "No shit, jackass. It's GTS at 140 proof!" Or they'll turn their noses up to fine budget whiskies like VOB or Dixie Dew when they see the $12 price sticker and start crowing about the "real kickass bottle of Basil Hayden" they've got at home. If they could only read my mind when I privately mutter obscenities.:slappin:

bllygthrd
08-10-2012, 17:23
"Of course, when I am older and richer and have cash burning holes in my pocket, this good bourbon vs. 0 bourbon issue will probably mean nothing and my attitude about great bourbon will change accordingly."
I reached the "older" stage, but with weddings, kids buying homes and grandchildren ... the "richer and have cash burning holes in my pocket" stage has evaded me.:lol: So good cheap bourbon prevails.

bad_scientist
08-10-2012, 19:43
Or they'll turn their noses up to fine budget whiskies like VOB or Dixie Dew when they see the $12 price sticker and start crowing about the "real kickass bottle of Basil Hayden" they've got at home. If they could only read my mind when I privately mutter obscenities.:slappin:

My wife makes me take the price tags off my dusties! She thinks it makes them look cheap and not worth offering to guests... Oh man, words haven't yet been invented for the out-of-place feeling I get then...

mosugoji64
08-10-2012, 22:46
My wife makes me take the price tags off my dusties! She thinks it makes them look cheap and not worth offering to guests... Oh man, words haven't yet been invented for the out-of-place feeling I get then...

Those of us in the know realize that price is not a reliable indicator of quality. Screw the hipsters! I'm keepin' my HH BIB ...

bad_scientist
08-11-2012, 06:59
Man, ain't that the truth! Because I have so much more bourbon on hand than all of my friends, over time every one of them has become a critic. So even if I give them something special (which they invariably know absolutely nothing about) they start spouting off about "this one's too astringent" and "that one's got too much burn." And I'm thinking, "No shit, jackass. It's GTS at 140 proof!" Or they'll turn their noses up to fine budget whiskies like VOB or Dixie Dew when they see the $12 price sticker and start crowing about the "real kickass bottle of Basil Hayden" they've got at home. If they could only read my mind when I privately mutter obscenities.:slappin:

Oh boy, last week I stopped in a store to pick up some 4RSB, and a businessman/lobbyist/politician waltzed into the bourbon section. He asked an employee, "Do you have any, uh, Van Winkles? Maybe a Pappy 12? I missed the other Pappies this year."

Good grief.. Anyway, despite getting some great advice and even samples of single barrel picks from the very enthusiastic employee, he waited until the employee left and told another guy to get him a bottle of Basil Hayden!


Those of us in the know realize that price is not a reliable indicator of quality. Screw the hipsters! I'm keepin' my HH BIB ...

/flies the flag proudly

callmeox
08-11-2012, 07:19
The reasons above are why I don't talk price when doing a tasting.

I had malt drinkers chins dropping with VOB and Ritt BIB when they learned the retail price after the session.

I do struggle with the snob idea because we are talking about matters of personal taste. People prefer what they prefer so there's really no wrong answer.

CoMobourbon
08-11-2012, 07:21
I reached the "older" stage, but with weddings, kids buying homes and grandchildren ... the "richer and have cash burning holes in my pocket" stage has evaded me.:lol: So good cheap bourbon prevails.

Hey, come on now; A kid's gotta' dream!

MyOldKyDram
08-11-2012, 07:22
Simple solution there. Don't have children!

CoMobourbon
08-11-2012, 08:02
Simple solution there. Don't have children!

Oh no no - I meant me. Forget my future kids.

boss302
08-12-2012, 20:55
Currently enjoying some Dickel No. 12, washed-down with a glass of the Weis grocery store brand White Birch Beer (a North-Central Pennsylvania favorite!). Simple, honest, and tasty! Possibly following this up with some Evan Williams 1783 that I recently picked-up from out-of-state (it's great to have friends in Delaware!)

Next time, I will likely pick up a 1.75L bottle of Henry McKenna. I am currently seeking out the best of the "bargain" bourbon brands (McAfee Benchmark No. 8 is my current favorite of that category), and would love to give that one a spin.

It's good to hear the perspectives of fellows who have been drinking bourbon far longer than I on this matter. Keep them coming!

mosugoji64
08-12-2012, 22:59
Currently enjoying some Dickel No. 12, washed-down with a glass of the Weis grocery store brand White Birch Beer (a North-Central Pennsylvania favorite!). Simple, honest, and tasty! Possibly following this up with some Evan Williams 1783 that I recently picked-up from out-of-state (it's great to have friends in Delaware!)

Next time, I will likely pick up a 1.75L bottle of Henry McKenna. I am currently seeking out the best of the "bargain" bourbon brands (McAfee Benchmark No. 8 is my current favorite of that category), and would love to give that one a spin.

It's good to hear the perspectives of fellows who have been drinking bourbon far longer than I on this matter. Keep them coming!

Not to hijack the thread, but I LOVE that Weis White Birch Beer! The only one I like more is Kutztown. Have you tried that one? The PA birch beers have spoiled me for most root beers.

unclebunk
08-13-2012, 06:02
Not that it's easy to come by here in Chicagoland, but I've been digging the hell out of JTS Brown BIB for months now and that's quickly becoming a "go to" under $20 bourbon for me. Too bad that it's also becoming the "go to" for all my friends when they stop by, as I can't seem to keep up with the demand.:grin:

unclebunk
08-13-2012, 06:05
Currently enjoying some Dickel No. 12, washed-down with a glass of the Weis grocery store brand White Birch Beer (a North-Central Pennsylvania favorite!). Simple, honest, and tasty! Possibly following this up with some Evan Williams 1783 that I recently picked-up from out-of-state (it's great to have friends in Delaware!)

Next time, I will likely pick up a 1.75L bottle of Henry McKenna. I am currently seeking out the best of the "bargain" bourbon brands (McAfee Benchmark No. 8 is my current favorite of that category), and would love to give that one a spin.

It's good to hear the perspectives of fellows who have been drinking bourbon far longer than I on this matter. Keep them coming!


Not to hijack the thread, but I LOVE that Weis White Birch Beer! The only one I like more is Kutztown. Have you tried that one? The PA birch beers have spoiled me for most root beers.

Why don't you guys start a root beer thread? I'd be very interested to hear about regional favorites, especially the PA ones I don't know about. That White Birch sure sounds good!

White Dog
08-13-2012, 17:14
Why don't you guys start a root beer thread? I'd be very interested to hear about regional favorites, especially the PA ones I don't know about. That White Birch sure sounds good!

That would be a fun thread. Sure wish I could get Goose Island Root Beer in WI!

bllygthrd
08-13-2012, 17:53
digging the hell out of JTS Brown BIB for months now and that's quickly becoming a "go to" under $20 bourbon for me.
Hmmm ... I've had a bottle of JTS Brown BIB on the bourbon bar for a while, un-cracked ... your post has made me happy that I picked it up and has given me motivation to crack it open ... Thanks!