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macdeffe
08-19-2012, 05:41
As far as I know there is no distinguishing between bourbons if they are from a one distillery or blends. Often we as drinkers dont know

High West has a bourbon out I see and I see its a blend

Whiskey#1: 6 year old Bourbon distilled and aged at the old Seagrams plant in Lawrenceburg Indiana. Mashbill from 75% Corn, 20% rye, 5% barley malt.

Whiskey#2: 10 year old Bourbon distilled by Four Roses. Mashbill from 60% Corn, 35% rye, 5% barley malt.

The name will be American Prairie Reserve and I have read that 10% of the proceeds will go to http://www.americanprairie.org/

Steffen

cowdery
08-20-2012, 00:23
It's a peculiarity of the rule that a mixture of straight bourbons made at different distilleries in the same state may be labeled as 'straight bourbon,' but a mixture of straight bourbons made at different distilleries in different states must be labeled 'a blend,' although it can and should be labeled 'a blend of straight bourbon whiskies,' if it contains only straight bourbon.

The recent rash of so-called curated bourbons and ryes appearing from 3rd parties at a time when aged whiskey is supposed to be in short supply shows us that, despite the denials of some, all of the major producers are in the bulk whiskey business. The caveat is that most of them only sell bulk whiskey for inventory adjustment purposes, and not in the course of their normal business. It is normal business for LDI and has always been part of Heaven Hill's business, only not so much these days because there really isn't much surplus. When there is, what's a bookkeeping correction for the majors can be a major new product introduction for a High West.

I got a peak at LDI's inventory sheet recently and while they're short on the now famous LDI 95% rye with decent age on it, they've got good stocks of both bourbons up to 7-years-old. They make a 25% rye bourbon and a 40% rye bourbon. All of their recipes are 5% malt. Their bourbons haven't hit the market like the rye has, but Redemption Bourbon and William Henry Harrison Bourbon are two examples.

FYI, if you're thinking about starting a brand, LDI's minimum for a bulk whiskey sale is 20 barrels. You don't even need to have a DSP if you transfer them to someone that does, like Bardstown Barrel Selections or Kentucky Bourbon Distillers, for bottling and distribution.

p_elliott
08-20-2012, 08:47
Chuck I liked how you pointed out that it can and should be labeled as "a blend of straight bourbon whiskey". That has always bothered me calling that a blend same as blended whiskey 2 completely different animals.

cowdery
08-20-2012, 14:31
The designation is available so you might as well use it. If you can't, then that's suspicious and I would want to know why.

sku
08-20-2012, 16:16
Just to clarify, High West does label the American Prarie Reserve a "blend of straight bourbons."

cowdery
08-21-2012, 01:42
Then all is right with the world.

unclebunk
08-21-2012, 04:42
Thanks for the info, Chuck. As always, very informative. Will keep my eye out for the American Prairie Reserve.

Borchard
04-01-2013, 09:09
I was just walking though the Salt Lake airport and saw that High West has their own bar. They had many full, opened bottles of their products on the shelf, but I was told they are not yet allowed to sell bottles to customers

squire
04-01-2013, 09:27
Were they allowed to sell drinks?

Borchard
04-01-2013, 10:07
Were they allowed to sell drinks?
Yes, I believe they are

HighInTheMtns
04-01-2013, 10:34
I was just walking though the Salt Lake airport and saw that High West has their own bar. They had many full, opened bottles of their products on the shelf, but I was told they are not yet allowed to sell bottles to customers
Count on "not yet allowed" meaning "never will be allowed." But that notwithstanding, there's some great places to get a preflight drink in our little airport.

Gillman
04-01-2013, 10:36
A blend of straight bourbons is, of course, an old concept in American whiskey-merchandising and it makes excellent sense too from a palate standpoint when properly done. I doubt the term blend when used in this sense conveys anything negative. It is true that old hands such as many here (I included!) know the history of the term blended, but today I would think the younger generation doesn't get any negatives with the term especially when one thinks of the cocktail revival. It's all good.

Gary

squire
04-01-2013, 12:44
Gary I would think the younger generation could be made to believe blended is better.

MyOldKyDram
04-01-2013, 16:02
I already believe that in some cases, see 4R SmB LE.

squire
04-01-2013, 16:32
Precisely Sean, just because blended may have a certain connotation for some of we senior members doesn't make it a bad word and certainly not a bad idea.

Gillman
04-01-2013, 18:07
Yes, good points, I agree.

Gary

Gillman
04-01-2013, 18:19
Very a propos to mention 4R, since something rather similar was done with the very same marque circa-1940:

http://books.google.ca/books?id=xEQEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA42&dq=blend+of+straight+whiskeys&hl=en&sa=X&ei=DSNaUfbrNIXY2AWIoICYCw&ved=0CEwQ6AEwBTgK#v=onepage&q=blend%20of%20straight%20whiskeys&f=false

Gary

T Comp
04-01-2013, 22:03
how
Very a propos to mention 4R, since something rather similar was done with the very same marque circa-1940:

http://books.google.ca/books?id=xEQEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA42&dq=blend+of+straight+whiskeys&hl=en&sa=X&ei=DSNaUfbrNIXY2AWIoICYCw&ved=0CEwQ6AEwBTgK#v=onepage&q=blend%20of%20straight%20whiskeys&f=false

Gary

That is a great find Gary. It is also fascinating ad history, how the copywriter writes a headline for the ad which cannot be fully understood unless the story is read...and unlike today even without irony.