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Dave_in_Canada
07-29-2003, 15:58
What is your favourite shape of glass for sampling your favourite (or a new) bourbon, NEAT or with a splash of water (ie. no ice, no mixer). Keep in mind... all-round performance. See below for photo, and additional comments welcome!

Paradox
07-29-2003, 16:21
I've got them all and overall my favorite is the Riedel Bourbon glass. It concentrates everything nice, fits my hand best for the way I like to 'hold' my bourbon, and the price is not too bad for a set of 4 Riedel glasses. Next to the Riedel Bourbon Glass, I find myself using the Blender's Nosing Glass second most often. It really concentrates the aromas beautifully. Third is the Riedel Scotch glass. I find it to be way overpriced in my opinion, and even though thin is in for tasting glasses, I'm just too damn scared of breaking it. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif But honestly, I find the other glasses concentrate the aromas better and fit more nicely in my hand.

CL
07-29-2003, 17:59
Nice touch with the photes. It really enhances the poll.

I have limited my bourbon tasting to brandy snifters and lowball glasses. At home, I almost always use the snifter, though I occasionally use my small Getz musuem lowball glasses when I want to limit my intake. (A little bit of bourbon looks like alot more in a small Getz glass.)

I haven't been inclined to try one of the whisky/bourbon glasses because I've seen no clear consensus on whether they are better than snifters. (It doesn't help when I see PR photos of the master distillers using snifters.) Also, I've seen no clear consensus about which one is best among the whiskey/bourbon glasses. So, I've decided to keep it simple and stay with my snifter. But, I am open minded. Maybe this thread will show me something that I haven't thought of before.

mike1
07-29-2003, 18:51
I do believe that whiskey should be taken from a low ball glass. fancy glasses to me are an affectation that take away from the notion that we a drinking just whiskey after all. To me there is something comforting in drinking from a simple glass.

CL
07-29-2003, 19:05
just whiskey



Sacrilege! Good thing we aren't a normal Internet discussion group or else you would be flamed. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/hot.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif

Seriously, we respect all opinions here. None of us are above the rest and we all like to hear other's opinions.

I think that the snifter does concentrate the nose of a good bourbon and enhances the flavor. I used to think like you until I tried a sample of very familiar (to me) Knob Creek in a snifter at Jim Beam in Clermont last summer. I was amazed at the difference and immediately went out and bought a set of snifters.

Paradox
07-29-2003, 19:10
I used to think like you until I tried a sample of very familiar (to me) Knob Creek in a snifter at Jim Beam in Clermont last summer. I was amazed at the difference and immediately went out and bought a set of snifters.



Same here. I thought it was all bull until I got my set of Riedel Bourbon glasses. From there I was a believer and went on to get a few others to try. Each one does have its own unique way of 'presenting' its contents...

bluesbassdad
07-29-2003, 19:32
I voted for the lowball glass, but it's a rather special one, with a slightly tapered top, similar to the fancier shapes. It's the Rare Breed glass, which I didn't care for at first because it doesn't fit securely into my hand.

Nevertheless, it has become my go-to glass, whether I drink neat, with water or on the rocks.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

CL
07-29-2003, 20:43
For me personally, there is more variance in the different bourbons I try. There is alot more for me to learn with different bourbons than there is more me to learn about the nuances with different glasses with a single bourbon. So, the fancy glasses are in the future for me. Than again, one set of them may show up on my Christmas list. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

kitzg
07-30-2003, 13:23
#6 (lowball) for drinking. I take mine with a little ice for sipping bourbon. I still prefer #6 for nosing but have used #5. Snifters (5s) tend to concentrate the nose as you say but sometimes I feel that is a bit overpowering.

I do want to thank the distilleries for selling such nice glassware! It is those that I usually reach for.

And I always look for the gift sets around the holidays since Chuck pointed out that the glasses are normally thrown in for free!

Blackkeno
07-30-2003, 22:59
My vote was also for the Riedel Bourbon glass. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif My second choice wasn't listed, the Pure Glass from Maison du whisky. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/yum.gif My next choice would have been the Glencairn blender's nosing glass. I really think snifters concentrate the aromas too much, but I sometimes use them at bars because they rarely have anything better. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/hot.gif

cornsqueezins
07-31-2003, 06:39
I'm the same way....sampling the many bourbons that are still out there is challenging enough for me without adding the glassware variable into the equation. I'd like to purchase the Riedel glassware and the Blender's nosing glass at some future time but right now it's not a major concern.

I do have a couple of brandy snifters that I've occasionally used to sip bourbon but, like Greg, I find that the nose with these glasses is usually overpowering. I hope that when and if I purchase other nosing glasses like the Riedel that these glasses will provide better nosing than the snifters.

I almost always prefer to use my Jack Daniels lowball glass. I guess some here would consider that blasphemous, but I don't really care what's inscribed on the glass; just so long as it doesn't say something stupid like 'War Eagle' or 'AU'. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif (Had to throw that in since college football is right around the corner!).

Anyway, the JD lowball has thick glass sides and is nicely weighted. I really enjoy it. Strangely, I did not get it at any of the shops in Lynchburg but at some gift shop in a mall several years back. I actually haven't found any lowball glasses of similar quality in Lynchburg.

-Troy

Buckky
07-31-2003, 12:26
I have used almost exclusively a cut-glass lowball glass. However just recently I bought a Riedel glass at "Party Source" in Bellevue,Ky (Cincinnati). it was really cheap...less than 4bucks I believe....have not really tried it yet with a real "quality" bourbon. I might add that the Spiegelau glasses that Jeff talks about are really cool to look at and I may someday spring some money for one of those.

ratcheer
07-31-2003, 15:43
just so long as it doesn't say something stupid like 'War Eagle' or 'AU'.



At least you are against the right school. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Tim

ratcheer
07-31-2003, 15:48
None of those.

Usually, a cut crystal "on the rocks" glass. It is shorter and lighter than your lowball glass.

Often, a similar crystal highball glass.

Sometimes, any glass that is handy. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif

Tim

MurphyDawg
07-31-2003, 20:33
I use an Old Fashioned Glass to drink bourbon over ice, and a snifter to drink it neat.

TomC

robbyvirus
07-31-2003, 23:10
I picked up a blender's nosing glass at the whiskey expo in San Francisco this spring, and I've been using it a lot since. It's great for concentrating the nose, although yes, at times it can be almost too much, especially with the higher proofs. I also have a lowball glass that I use. I like to flip back and forth between the two...they're both a bit different, in the nose and in the hand, and I like the variety.

jbutler
08-01-2003, 06:50
So y'all know what Robby and me are talking about, addmission fee to the WhiskyExpo in SF this year also got you a glass clone of the GlenCairn style tasting glass.

The problem I have with that particular glass Robby is that it's quite heavy for it's size, and feels very awkward to me. That may seem like a strange thing to say, but the glass feels so "foreign" in my hand it actually detracts from the tasting experience.

robbyvirus
08-02-2003, 03:30
Yes, it is a heavy glass, but that doesn't seem to bother me. Actually, one of my favorite sets of lowball glasses I have are incredibly heavy...they could almost be used as weapons in the event of a bar fight. Maybe I just prefer the hefty glasses....helps build up my biceps as I'm downing the Van Winkle...

jeff
08-03-2003, 14:55
I agree with Dave here http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif The Rare Breed glass has become my favorite "drinking" glass. Tappered at the top to concentrate the nose and thick and heavy on the bottom. Got a set "free" with a christmas bottle of Rare Breed. Unfortunately I broke one and now they're nowhere to be found. I hope to see more of these around the holidays.

kgiammarco
08-03-2003, 22:00
in 2001 at the Buffalo Trace tasting, they had these glasses that were more or less port glasses but they had Buffalo Trace printed on them and 2 white lines going around the outside of the glass (reminded me of the lines on the glasses in the bars england that they fill to)... If you look at the small batch bourbon glass it is more or less a midget port glass.. same bowl with a nonexistant stem... in any case, they are nice glasses to drink from... Altho it is a very minor thing, i think that they make the bourbon look more pleasing than just a rocks glass, and sometimes it is nice to just enjoy small things like that after a crap day at work... http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif

They're a pain in the ass to clean (i hear dishwasher=bad for them) , but the ridel sommoliers port glasses are a nice thing sometimes for that 20 pappy or hirsch... I don't know if i would buy them just for bourbon, but they are a nice dual-use item...

-chris

Barrel_Proof
08-05-2003, 20:12
Here's a pic of my second favorite glass. It appears that way too many of Jeff's and Tom's vitamins made it into this pour, however.

CL
08-05-2003, 20:16
Now that is funny! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif

jbutler
08-06-2003, 07:49
Yep, few would think of Fisher Scientific as a source for glassware, but Cliff has hit on one of my favorite pieces of of bourbon paraphernalia.

Beakers are good, but I find that the Erlenmeyer flask does a better job of concentrating vapor. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif

Barrel_Proof
08-06-2003, 16:54
As I posted last night, the Griffin beaker is my SECOND FAVORITE glass and the best for bourbon on the rocks, or, more recently, Stagg on a Rock.

Jim stole my follow-up thunder, however, anticipating that my FAVORITE glass and the best for drinking neat would, indeed, be the Erlenmeyer flask.

At this moment you can get a set of twelve 125ml Erlenmeyers, with markings in four different colors for $18.48 here (http://www.surpluslabware.com). They're great for blind tasting parties. Load up the <font color="red">Red</font> ones with Pappy, the <font color="blue">Blue</font> ones with Hirsch, the <font color="green">Green</font> ones with B'Day bourbon, and the <font color="yellow">Yellow</font> ones with Old Charter Proprietor's Reserver and taste away.

bobbyc
08-06-2003, 19:15
Well that's great, Finally someone has the discipline to introduce a little scientific method here!! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drinking.gif

MurphyDawg
08-06-2003, 19:59
SCIENCE!!!! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drinking.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drinking.gifBah, all I need is an open bottle amd my mouth (J/K)!! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drinking.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drinking.gif

Tom (drink it man, DRINK IT!!) C

Forbes
08-24-2003, 12:14
For a tasting I will usually use a reidel bourbon glass or a brandy snifter.

For just enjoying some bourbon neat I usually use a heavy crystal on the rocks glass or a heavy 4 oz. shot glass.

Todd

ratcheer
08-24-2003, 18:06
I found my Waterford balloons, yesterday. I think I will give one a whirl, soon.

Kentucky Spirit or Blanton's?

Tim

Barrel_Proof
08-24-2003, 18:14
Tonight, KS. I visited a new Sichuan restaurant today and discovered a locked cabinet near the cashier in which a bottle of KS was displayed prominently. Upon further discussion with the manager, I learned that this bourbon was reserved solely for the owner. I informed the manager that I could provide her with some rare and amazing bourbon and, to cut to the chase, I think we have a new restaurant at which we will be visiting regularly! The food is fine and the management loves bourbon. Hey, life could be worse!

Paradox
08-24-2003, 18:27
Blanton's, but that's just my favorite of the two...

Dave_in_Canada
08-24-2003, 19:46
Lately my personal favourite for specific tasting has been a french wine tasting glass (verre à dégustation*) which does a great job of concentrating the nose, but not overso... and a pleasure to drink from. I have a couple that were a gift from a winemaker in the chablis region of France. My wife and I took the time to bicycle to his vineyard in the hills and converse -- in my poor broken french -- about the pleasures of wine. His gift to me, after my purchase of only three bottles, was two wind tasting glasses and three bottles of Belgian bottle-conditioned beer.

So, don't be afraid to enjoy your bourbon is a wine glass!


*
Verre à dégustation

bluesbassdad
08-25-2003, 10:37
My vote is for Blanton's. (It needs all the help it can get to concentrate its very pleasant, but meager, nose. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif Of course, there are those who say the same about Kentucky Spirit.)

Seriously, I keep hoping someone with some actual tasting skills (which takes me out of the running) will post tasting notes on his or her favorite bourbon, consumed from a variety of glasses, ranging from a shot glass to something akin to your glasses. Whaddaya say?

BTW, nice double entendre.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

ratcheer
08-31-2003, 05:41
Okay, last night the house quietened down early, so I cleaned and dried one of my Waterford balloons. Damn, I didn't remember how heavy those things are. The snifter, by itself must weigh about 6 ounces.

I had almost convinced myself to do this with OFBB, but I decided to stick with your recommendation and went with Blanton's. I poured at least two ounces and settled down with a book.

At first, the Blanton's seemed about like vodka in comparison to the bold bourbons I usually enjoy. But, as I nosed and sipped and the whiskey warmed up a little, it became one of the most pleasant drinks I have ever had. The snifter definitely added to the experience, both in the nosing and the visual sensations. I am reminded of the true meaning of the term "crystal clear".

Highly recommended. However, when my wife gave them to me for Christmas many years ago (more than 10, less than 15), they were $80 each. There's no telling what they sell for, now.

Tim

Paradox
08-31-2003, 05:52
Isn't it amazing what a nice snifter can do for a bourbon... I really love Blanton's, and after getting my Riedel Bourbon Glasses my whole Blanton's experience went to another level. Finding a snifter one likes can really enhance the tastings of even already loved bourbons. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

MurphyDawg
10-27-2003, 22:37
I have since got one of those Riedel "Small Batch Bourbon" glasses and despite the fact it looks to the contrary, it really does enhance the bourbonic experience. Sadly the dogs knocked it out of the strainer today and it buster, so I need another one soon.


The glass I would really like to get my hands on to try is the Pure glass by Maison du whisky, as suggested previously in this forum. It looks to me like a great melding of the Old-Fashioned style glass with a more specific, snifter-tasting-style glass. I am really curious about how effective this mutation is.


Tom (Bleah) C

Paradox
10-28-2003, 05:00
This guy keep selling sets of the Riedel Bourbon Glasses on eBay. (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&amp;item=3633287894&amp;category=82 3) Sometimes they get few bids and sometimes they go for a bit more like this one here... Still, save your money Tom and get the Riedels. Just my opinion before I have to hear everyone saying oh no, the other ones are soooo nice.

Hey, while you're there on eBay, check this out. (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&amp;item=3249192948&amp;category=56 3) That person has got to be out of their mind! If it sells I'm going to a craft store TODAY to buy myself a gold marker... http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Dave_in_Canada
10-28-2003, 09:27
Tom, I'm with Mark... stick with the Riedel. The glassware you've shown has a slight outbend on the rim. You'd be amazed at how this can affect - negatively - the concentration of the nose. If you liked your previous Riedel, these glasses would be less effective in that portion of your tasting experience. Pretty glasses, though http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

jeff
10-28-2003, 10:11
The glassware you've shown has a slight outbend on the rim. You'd be amazed at how this can affect - negatively



Notice though that the glass curves in slightly before flaring out at the end. IMHO, this concentrates the bouquet then gently places the bourbon on your tongue. What do you find negative about it Dave? http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Dave_in_Canada
10-28-2003, 11:28
Jeff, I'll ramble on here for a quick minute about this, since it's an interest of mine.

I'm a big believer in the concept that if you're not using your nose, you're missing out on alot of what's in the bottle (that may sound obvious, forgive me). Try enjoying your favourite bourbon when you have a sinus cold, and you'll see what I mean. Or take a taste of bourbon when your nose is pinched and all you'll get is the burn.

I've done a ton of side-by-side comparisons of different glass shapes (all of the glass shapes in my original glassware poll photo plus many others). In side-by-side tastings, ALL the glasses with a slight outbend on the rim effectively diffused the nose a bit too much for bourbon, IMHO.

The Riedel scotch glass (second from left) is a perfect example of an rim that diffuses the nose, but in the case of single malts, sometimes the nose is overpowering. However with the finer spirit - bourbon - the Riedel glass is simply too wide at the rim.

I'd be the first to admit that some folks don't like a heavy nose. Some like the body of the bourbon, some the finish, TEHO. I love the nose, so FOR ME, that's a negative thing to diffuse.

To complicate things, I sometimes even choose a different glass for a different mood, especially with some bourbons like Knob Creek, which can have a very woody nose. Heck, I'll even enjoy a bourbon in a lowball glass. For me, it's just a different way to enjoy.

In the photo, the third and forth from left are also Sc*tch tasting glasses (Bowmore and Springbank) with the wider rim. I’ve tried many bourbons in those glasses but the nose gets lost. My current favourite is on the far right, a french wine tasting glass.

The advantage of sticking with a good nosing glass, is that if you find the nose a bit overpowering for the spirit, you can adjust the angle, or your breathing, and reduce the nose. However with a wider rim, there’s not a lot you can do to increase the nose.

Jeff, I challenge you to put the same bourbon in different glassware and do a side-by-side. Better yet, do a blind taste testing in different glassware. Then get back to me with your results. I'd be interested in your comments.



http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Paradox
10-28-2003, 12:21
Couldn't agree with you more Dave. I used to think it was all BS but after getting quite an assortment of glasses and using them all there definately is a difference. I've got the same glasses as you, with the exception of 1 but I have that Blenders Malt Glass thing that wasnt in your pic, and I still go back to the Riedel Bourbon glass every time. The glass you say you like on the far right is similiar to what they have at Buffalo Trace every year we go there for tastings.

Dave_in_Canada
10-28-2003, 12:30
And completely forget about shot glasses! They're for the JD crowd. But that's a completely different rant!

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

jeff
10-28-2003, 13:25
The thing I don't particularly like about the Riedel bourbon glass is its construction. It is part of the "overture" line of inexpensive glass-made Riedels, whereas the Single Malt is part of the Vinum line, made of crystal. Why does bourbon take a back seat here http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/hot.gif? While I might not own an entire set of bourbon tasting ware, I have drank from glasses that resemble those pictured here, as well as the finest dixie cups money can buy http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif, and I keep comming back to my Rare Breed glasses. Just what I enjoy I guess. I also think that there is a psychological effect when drinking from "fancy" glasses. You expect it to taste better, so it does. JMHO http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Dave_in_Canada
10-28-2003, 13:31
I know what you mean about the lower quality of the Riedel bourbon glass. It's one thing I don't like about it. And frankly I also don't like the branding (Small Batch Collection) around the base.... Can you show me a photo of your favourite Rare Breed glass? In the photo a couple of posts back, the glass on the far left is a rare breed snifter, but I have a sneaking suspicion that you're talking about something different.

Paradox
10-28-2003, 13:33
It is part of the "overture" line of inexpensive glass-made Riedels, whereas the Single Malt is part of the Vinum line, made of crystal.



OMG, you sound like Chris! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif I can buy 2 sets of the Riedel Bourbon glasses for what one of those, in my opinion, worthless Riedel Scotch glasses costs... I could care if its crystal or glass. The only thing that I do care a bit about that i find makes a bit of difference is the thickness of the lip. The bourbon glass from Riedel is plenty thin compared to normal glasses. Hell, the scotch glass from riedel is almost too thin, I can see it breaking eventually. In the end though it's like you and we all have been saying, it's just one's personal preference.

jeff
10-28-2003, 13:37
Dave, click here (http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthreads/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Number=11259&amp;page=1&amp;view=col lapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;vc=1) for a picture from a previous post. Not the best pic, but it will give you an idea. I like the think, heavy feel of these glasses and the slight taper inward of the sides. Just feels good in the hand. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

OneCubeOnly
10-28-2003, 17:09
Tom-

I've been really curious about those glasses as well--I haven't been able to find much about them, (at least in English!), except I did find a glassware comparison (using Sc***h) that has them:

http://www.whiskyfun.com/klaus/Download/Glassware_final.pdf
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

MurphyDawg
10-29-2003, 00:23
You mean the Rare Breed old Fashioned Glass, like the ones they sold in the booth at the festival?? I have to admit that this would be my everyday drinking glass. i am glad folks suggested me picking one up (it was the absolute last thing I did, on my way back to the car to leave for OH).

TomC

MurphyDawg
10-29-2003, 00:27
My Dad has these double shot glasses with flare lips (I know, I'm sorry http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif) that I bought for him like 7 years ago as a birthday present, and I have to admit that sipping Booker's from them when I was down there (FLA) visiting in August was a very pleasurable thing, so maybe certain shot glasses arent a completely lost cause. . .



TomC

Dave_in_Canada
10-29-2003, 08:39
Hey Tom, visiting a Dad, pouring some Bookers, and enjoying a sip as friends is indeed a pleasurable thing in any glass ! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

CL
10-29-2003, 09:48
Based on your comments, I would think that the snifter (far left) would be as good as or better than the wine glass (far right). Can you comment on your experiences comparing these two glasses?

Dave_in_Canada
10-29-2003, 10:21
[Please bear in mind that my ideas on glassware are generalizations and specific to times when I am serious about tasting, or enjoying a premium pour.]

That snifter (purchased at Wild Turkey) is a bit too large for my taste... the volume inside the glass ends up concentrating the alcohol, overpowering some of the more delicate components of smell. I have a couple of smaller snifters that seem to work better (ie. less volume).

The wine tasting glass on the far right, for me, seems to be the right balance of nose without the overpowering effect alcohol.

I'm talking Bourbon here, not other spirits. (for instance i prefer Cognac in a huge snifter, for some reason).

Incidentally, my wife, who is just "getting into" bourbon, prefers a lowball glass, as she dislikes the alcohol in the nose, but loves the flavour.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Dave_in_Canada
10-29-2003, 11:53
That's a great link, thanks for posting it. It's very interesting to note that he rated the glasses differently for each malt. I agree with this, that each whiskey has it's particular merit(s ) and sometimes it takes a different shape of glass to discover it/them. This is one reason why a guy needs a huge collection of glassware! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

CL
10-29-2003, 13:55
I have some department store snifters (4 for $20). With these snifters, I don't find the alcohol to be overpowering in the nose. I get a fully textured nose that is very satisfying. It almost feels like I can taste the bourbon. It's like a dense mist wafting down into my throat and mouth. In fact, as I have worked to curtail my consumption, I spend alot more time savoring the nose. It helps increase the time between sips.

I've wondered alot about whether I should buy special-purpose bourbon or whiskey glassware, but your description has helped me realize I am on the right track with my snifter glasses. Thanks. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Dave_in_Canada
10-29-2003, 14:48
Hi Chuck, I don't meanto flog the http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/deadhorse.gif but this topic is one that really interests me.

The smaller dept. store style snifters are great. The one advantage of taster glass is that the sides are less steep, providing a smoother delivery... (I like how Jeff put it earlier "gently places the bourbon on your tongue"). Nevertheless, it's all about enjoyment, that's the key.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

cowdery
10-30-2003, 18:27
I've been tasting spirits with some degree of seriousness for more than 20 years and have tried a lot of different glasses: large and small snifters, large and small wine glasses, large and small shot glasses, on-the-rocks glasses, lowball glasses, and the blender's nosing glass, to which I was just introduced in recent years.

When I wanted to do some serious nosing I would use a snifter, but it was really too effective, especially the large ones. The snifter is perfect for cognac, pretty good for scotch, and too good for bourbon. The nose can just about knock you out.

As between snifters and wine glasses, wine glasses are better, and white wine rather than red. Just personal preferences here. I don't think there are any right or wrong answers about this.

Today I use the blender's nosing glass for serious tasting and a lowball glass for everyday drinking.

MurphyDawg
10-31-2003, 00:32
Does this mean my signed Four Roses bottle is worth $200, cause if anybody wants to buy it offa me for that, I am not too terribly attached to it http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif.

TomC

Gillman
10-31-2003, 02:10
Chuck, I am curious about your use of the term, "lowball glass". The term highball is well known of course; so is the vernacular term lowball (e.g. to make a "lowball offer", the term deriving from baseball usage). Everyone will know that you meant a short whiskey glass, but was that just a casual personal usage of yours or is the term lowball in fact generally used in the sense (in Chicago, perhaps?) you intended? I initiated a discussion the other day, on the Question and Answer forum of www.whiskymag.com (http://www.whiskymag.com), on the origin of the term highball. In the course of that discussion, I stated that lowball is not used in whiskey terminology to denote the opposite of highball! I have never heard or read that that it did until reading your post. Comments?

CL
10-31-2003, 09:35
The snifter is perfect for cognac, pretty good for scotch, and too good for bourbon. The nose can just about knock you out.



I experienced this last night. I was nosing WT 12 yo and it about singed my nose hairs. My sinues may have been oversensitive because I spent all day flying back from California to NC; airplanes really dry me out.

But, I like your idea - I just may dig out the white wine glasses and give them a try.

ratcheer
10-31-2003, 14:26
I am with you, Gillman. I am 52-years old and pretty widely read. I have heard the term "highball" all my life. But I first encountered the use of "lowball glass" here on sb.com a couple of months ago. I believe I may have mentioned that I thought it odd, possibly in this very thread.

Is a "lowball glass" different from an old fashioned glass? If yes, is it also different from an on-the-rocks glass?

Tim

Gillman
10-31-2003, 15:19
Well, Bettye Jo has since informed me the term lowball indeed is used in the whiskey business to mean a short drink of whiskey, e.g. it is understood at Heaven Hill in that sense. I do not know if a lowball glass is the same size as an old-fashioned glass, though (or a tumbler if that is different).

This raises a question for history buffs: was the term lowball always so used, i.e., from the era when highball was first used to mean a tall drink? If so, perhaps the former term has a regional meaning only.

Alternatively, it might be a 1990's coinage, which is what I think.

I welcome further thoughts. On the www.whiskymag.com (http://www.whiskymag.com) Question and Answer forum a contributor noted that "bolls of malt" was an early reference - in Scotland - to the barley malt used to make whisky. He suggested a link between that old (agricultural) expression, dating from the 1400's, and the expression "ball of malt". The latter is an Irish term meaning a drink of whiskey. The term is so defined in a lexicon of whisky terms posted on the site. I suggested on that forum that ball of malt, under American conditions, possibly became adapted to "highball". But I never thought (and in fact suggested therein to the contrary) that "lowball" meant the converse of highball in drinking terminology.

Gary

boone
11-01-2003, 00:30
I have sold many, many, many Lo-Ball glasses...That is what Heaven Hill calls this type of glassware...If you ask for a low ball glass this is what ya gonna get.. http://www.theoldsod.com/emmet_lo-ball_glass_sets.htm simular to the bottom row, with Evan Williams on it...

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Bettye Jo http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Gillman
11-01-2003, 03:31
Thanks Bettye Jo, this is very interesting, first, to show lowball (or lo-ball) has an established commercial meaning of a short glass of whiskey, but also because the designs on these glasses all relate to Irish culture. The glasses may be imported from Ireland (the bottom of the ad states Old Sod Imports). Possibly in Ireland the glasses are sold as "lo-ball" glasses too, although one can't tell from this particular ad. In any case, the Irish connection resurfaces! Ball of malt is an old Irish colloquial term for a drink of whiskey. Still, the term lo-ball glass may be American only (whether old-established or newish is hard to say without further evidence) and the Irish designs here may just be coincidence..

The glasses are nice and clearly intended for whiskey. They differ evidently from the old-fashioned or tumbler style of glass. They are shot-type glasses nicely stylized: exactly what one would expect to see today in the converse of the highball glass.

Gary

ratcheer
11-01-2003, 06:42
Looks like "on the rocks" glasses, to me. But I do see that that is what they call them.

Tim

cowdery
11-04-2003, 14:26
I would love to claim some arcane knowledge of glassware. In fact, I got "lowball" from the poll itself. It's the last one on the list and depicted at the far right in the picture. I have some, like them, and didn't know what to call them. They are bigger than a shot glass-even a jumbo shot--but smaller than an on-the-rocks glass.

Gary Regan in his The Bartenders Bible has a section on glassware. For whiskey drinks he offers (largest to smallest) Collins, Highball, Old-Fashioned and Shot. He describes the Collins as 10 to 14 oz., the Highball as 8 to 10 oz., the Old-Fashioned as 6 to 10 oz. and the Shot as 1 1/2 to 2 oz. The two glasses in my cupboard that I would consider lowballs are 6 and 8 oz. respectively so in Gary's lexicon, they would be small old-fashioned glasses.

Dave_in_Canada
11-04-2003, 16:12
Chuck, I've seen the term lowball here in Canada for years, especially in reference to manhattans, etc. I've seen it used in alot of recipes, synonomous with the old-fashioned glass. The photo in the poll was actually taken from this web page (http://www.cocktail.uk.com/features/bartending/glassware.asp) which has other glassware photos.

Black85L98
11-05-2003, 20:53
Tastes good out of any glass. Lowball or Old Fashioned I like a short clean look.

kitzg
11-10-2003, 13:31
I think in the past the term "old fashioned glass" was popular. According to some sources, An Old Fashioned glass has a heavy bottom that can withstand the pressures of muddling fruit, sugar and bitters upon it.

As more of us might drink a shot or a rich shot (1.5 to 2 oz) either neat or on ice the term lowball has come to mean that small, often rounded bottom glass that holds the correct amount.

The rounded versions fit very smoothly in my hand.

-- Greg

cowdery
11-10-2003, 20:36
The glassware makers are not consistent in their terminology. I have seen lines in which they offer both an "on-the-rocks" glass at maybe 10 oz. and an "old-fashioned" glass at maybe 12 oz.

Buckky
11-22-2003, 20:07
For years I used an inexpensive but attractive cut-glass, "low-ball" glass that was purchased from a common discount store. This set of four has now dwindled to one after nearly 15 years and some cracks and drops. Recently I bought a christmas "gift pack" that had a bottle of Rare Breed and two very nice "lowball" glasses that have a square bottom with large round sides and a discreet Wild Turkey logo on the side. These are larger glasses than my previous ones but they have a great "feel" to them and are now my regular choice...the "survivor" cut glass now being retired. If you see this gift box, check it out. It's a great price for an excellent bourbon and two glasses... about $24 bucks.

jeff
11-22-2003, 20:17
I'm glad you like those, as I am considering purchasing the set you mention. They are different from the Rare Breed glasses I got last year, but the do look nice enough.

ratcheer
11-23-2003, 05:33
I recently bought a Rare Breed gift box with two "on the rocks" glasses. With a $4-off sale price, it is still $27 in Alabama ( the home of high liquor prices). http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Tim

jeff
11-23-2003, 08:04
That's not a terrible price. It's $29 here in Lexington, glasses or none http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

njm
11-23-2003, 18:14
I've heard the term 'bathtub' referring to common glassware that is a bit wider and squarer at the base than the lowball glass (noted from the pictures that you so nicely provided in your poll). Buffalo Trace sold some pretty nice ones at its booth this year and made me push Bob's Jim Beam 'bathtubs' towards the back of the shelf in our already overcrowded glassware hutch. Reminiscently, a friend's husband told me that he and his dad would drink bourbon out of these 'bathtubs' with ice. I suppose the square base holds the ice cubes less awkwardly with less drippage from melting - so you can place a square peg in a squared off hole - and maintain ice cube temperature a little longer perhaps. Just this novice's little analysis of glass shape with regard to the rate at which the ice cubes melt, should you like your Bourbon on ice and not neat. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif

OneCubeOnly
11-23-2003, 18:19
Tom--remember before you mentioned the Maison du Whisky glasses? I found an online ordering site (in French), where they have 'em for 38 Euros:

http://www.whisky.fr/index.php?partie=1&amp;rub=1&amp;prod_id=2902&amp;prod_ins=290 2

The only problem is, I don't know French and don't recognize the United States in the list of 'destinations'...so they may not even ship here. Do you know French well enough to figure it out? (I'd like a set too!)

MurphyDawg
11-23-2003, 19:35
I was gonna say, Rare Breed has been as high as $35 in Ohio, I see it running locally at a $28 holiday special around here.

As a side note, I have been drinking my hogher end bourbon from a champagne flute recently (one that is ever so slightly curved in at the top). It seems to be doing a good jon of balancing between nose, and palate entry. Something to try.

TomC

Nightcap
12-08-2003, 16:34
You guys are educating me already.

I have been sipping my bourbon from thick, hefty “old-fashioned” glasses, which I picked up at a thrift store for 99 cents each. They are faceted, hold about 4 oz each, and are quite heavy. I have enjoyed drinking out of them because a) I like the hefty feeling in my hand, and b) it’s easy to gauge when an ounce or two has been poured into the glass.

When I started this thread, I was ready to concede that there may, in fact, be a psychological factor involved in drinking out of this or that kind of glass; however I had doubts that a certain kind of glass could noticeably effect the drinking experience. When I finished the thread, I was curious. So, last night, I broke out a small brandy snifter, (which hasn’t been used in a while,) and poured myself a splash of EW SB(‘93).

Wow! That glass made a huge difference, as far as what hit my nose. The other glasses simply did not yield the same thing to my oversized schnozzle. The difference was immediate and conspicuous. The snifter feels kinda classy in the hand, too.

AS I sat there, swirling, sniffing, and sipping, I made an observation as to how the snifter “works”. The bourbon in the glass sits in shallow pool at the bottom, maximizing the surface area via which the liquor can “breathe”. AND, when given a gentle swirl, the whiskey leaves a small film around the lower walls of the glass, which also serves as evaporative surface area. Thus, you have a WHOLE lot more air and whiskey in contact with each other, facillitating a vapourous exchange. Also, the tapered shape of the glass keeps those precious vapors in a pocket of air that is less likely to be disturbed and dispersed by “outside” air. The net effect is remarkable.

The only thing I didn’t like about it was the rather extreme taper, which made it slightly unnatural to drink out of. The bottom of the glass had to be lifted WAY up to get the nectar into my mouth. Perhaps I’ll look for one with a less radical taper; or maybe a pair of those sweet looking Riedels.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

jeff
10-18-2004, 16:12
Heaven Hill has introduced a set of Glencairn tasting glasses with the various HH logos etched into them (i.e. The "HH" heaven hill logo, Evan Williams Single Barrel, Old Fitzgerald) I picked up a couple while attending the preview and I must say that I am impressed with them so far.

bluesbassdad
10-18-2004, 17:20
Jeff,

I would have guessed you would like the Glencairn glass. Its slightly weighted bottom reminds me of the weighted Rare Breed (?) glasses (or glass http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif ) you like so well. At the same time it captures aroma as well as the Reidel glass, IMO, and without that air of fragility that makes me worry about breakage rather than enjoying the contents.

Do you happen to know the availability of the HH glasses now?

Yours truly,

Dave Morefield

jeff
10-18-2004, 18:56
Dave,

As far as I know, the only place to purchase the HH glasses is at the HH visitors center. I would be happy to pick up some for you the next time I'm there. I think it is still legal to ship glassware across state lines, isn't it? http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Your right, I like the heavy bottoms, just like the Rare Breed glass. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

ratcheer
10-18-2004, 19:01
Hey, I have some Rare Breed glasses I bought months ago (last Christmas?) and never opened. So, they are that nice, huh?

I guess I'd better go open them. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Tim

dgonano
10-19-2004, 12:26
I have some Glencairn glasses , purchased from Malt Advocate, and they are excellent. I also enjoy a good ol' rolypoly design that fits in the palm of your hand. Yes, like the Shell Oil glass.

ej178
10-20-2004, 17:28
Wow! More info on glassware than I could have imagined.

I too have been taking my bourbon in a simple lowball glass. I've got a set with my family crest on the side. I have looked at some of the high-end glasses and, even taking into account the positive psychological factor, would just rather spend my money on more bourbon. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/yum.gif

OneCubeOnly
10-20-2004, 18:24
I just realized after all this time I never voted in this one!!! I'm glad I waited though, because at the time this was written I would have done a write-in vote for "who cares!?", but after discovering the magic of the Riedel Bourbon glass I've become a believer.

loki1957
10-23-2004, 14:01
I like my Makers Mark wax dipped shot glasses.

Dan
05-17-2005, 20:25
i have always enjoyed the simple lowball rocks glass

then i tried some out of a brandy snifter and was amazed at how the aromas are forced to the nose

so i purchased a set of rocks glasses are are curved at the top like a brandy snifter and i have everything just how i like it http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

tlsmothers
05-18-2005, 17:31
I tried some bourbon out of a crazy looking wine glass from Slovenia this week. It looks like a tulip sort of, bit more tapered in than the regular pink wine style tulip glass. I tried to google the company to find a glass picture to link to but had no luck. (My camera's on the blink or I'd post a pic). Anyway, the glass rim fits right on the top of your lip and forced the liquid over the top of the tongue, trickling off the sides. Every spirit we tasted out of this glass seemed softer and easier. We jokingly laughed and said this may be the glass to get more women drinking bourbon, especially the fashionable Manhattan types. Don't laugh at me when I show up at the Festival with one of these so you can try it.

kitzg
05-20-2005, 05:05
I find brandy snifters fine for some bourbons but the higher the alcohol content the more that can overpower from the concentration.

Bamber
05-20-2005, 06:19
The Scotch malt whisky society glasses are my favourite. Everything seems to taste great out of them even Scotch http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

NorCalBoozer
06-03-2005, 12:44
just received my Reidel Bourbon glasses! yes!

They are a lot smaller that I was imagining, but very cool.

I usually drink out of a short tumbler, neat.

now i have a reason to crack another Stagg. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/woohoo.gif

cas
06-06-2005, 04:39
Anybody know what kind of glass is pictured on the jacket of "Whiskey, the Definitive World Guide" - Michael Jackson's new book? You can see the cover on Amazon.
Craig
Not sure if the link will work (it truncates when I preview it) but here it is:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/det...=books&n=507846 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0789497107/qid=1118057760/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/102-8016718-2145727?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)

monte
06-06-2005, 08:09
I don't know, but as a hobby, I make drinking glasses very similar to that... Heavy bases, smooth curves, thin lips, almost no tooling marks, no molds or cold working used.

I'll post some pics sometime...


-monte-

pepcycle
06-07-2005, 17:42
Did you say?


but as a hobby, I make drinking glasses


I'd love to send you some sketches and maybe we could design the "perfect" SB.com bourbon vessel.
I took a glassblowing glass in college. I was making Dewar seals and my classmates were making bongs. I really should get back into it.
Whaddya Say Monte? http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/woohoo.gif

miller542
06-07-2005, 20:13
maybe we could design the "perfect" SB.com bourbon vessel.



The "SB.com glass" if you will. Count me in! Let's do this. Nothing better than a hand-crafted piece of art as a sampling and conversation piece all in one! Sign me up for a set!

monte
06-07-2005, 20:49
It's definitely possible - send along some sketches! I'll get some photos put together and post them here - maybe there's already one in my repertiore that will work?

I do have to warn you, without the use of molds, it's sorta tough to make two or more of the same glass. I can get close, but they're never exact. That's actually a feature if you think about it the right way, but it does pose problems sometimes, for example when you're trying to accurately compare two spirits...

The type of glassblowing I'm doing is with a 300 lb. crucible of 2100 degree F soft glass and a 5' blowpipe - is that what you studied? Fun stuff, although now that summer is arriving, the sweating will really start!!

Take care,

-monte-

NeoTexan
06-08-2005, 03:20
Sign me up for one of those glasses!

kbuzbee
07-26-2005, 12:40
Like bluesbassdad I have come to rely on my Rare Breed glasses (they were included in a Christmas offering a few years ago). They have a similar taper to the Reidel glass but a larger area and overall size that fits my (somewhat less than delicate) hands better. (6'6" 310#s.... you get the idea). I have thought about trying a set of the Reidel Bourbon glasses but these seem to do quite nicely.

Cheers,

Ken

BourbonJoe
07-26-2005, 17:48
I like to use a large brandy snifter. If it's good enough for fine cognac it should be adequate for bourbon. I have found it so.
Joe http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/usflag.gif

bluesbassdad
07-26-2005, 18:28
Ken,

I've had a change of heart and habit regarding glassware since I made that post.

The Rare Breed glass is still my first choice on the increasingly rare occasions when I drink bourbon on the rocks. Otherwise, it's about 50/50 between the Glencairn and the Riedel. I've even learned from experience that my fears that the stem of the Riedel glass will break without warning were unfounded. Nevetheless, I still find the Riedel glass less comfortable to hold than the Glencairn. The foot and short stem may photograph well, but they are anything but ergonomic, IMO.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

TNbourbon
07-26-2005, 18:46
Which Rare Breed glasses are you guys talking about? I have two sets, both tapered inward, but otherwise very different:

pepcycle
07-26-2005, 20:33
I can't believe that there is a vessel "Good Enough" for cognac. Its so vain, It probably thinks this post is about it.
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/stickpoke.gif

kbuzbee
07-27-2005, 06:34
I was talking about the glass on the right. It just feels "right" to me BUT I have not tried either of the other glasses. Looks like I have research to do (darn it!!! ;-)

Cheers,

Ken

kbuzbee
07-27-2005, 06:42
"Otherwise, it's about 50/50 between the Glencairn and the Riedel. "

Thanks Dave, The Glencairn glass looks alot like the nosing glass I got when we toured the Scotch Malt Whiskey Heritage Center this Spring.... I like it for tasting but it doesn't have quite the volumn I like for 'sipping'. The Reidel glass lookslike it would be kinda small too (just barely larger than my Reidel Tulip glasses). It's a great size for tasting.... just not for drinking IMO.

Cheers,

Ken

bluesbassdad
07-27-2005, 10:58
. . . but it doesn't have quite the volumn I like for 'sipping'.



Ken,

I find that filling the Glencairn glass to just above its widest point makes what I consider a full-sized pour. (YMMV, obviously.) However, sometimes I wish the opening were a little wider. Someone here expressed the same opinion, saying he liked to have room for his nose inside the mouth of the glass as he drank.

Jim Butler posted about a small, roundish, plain-bottom glass a while back, and I thought it looked promising. However, I never got around to trying one. I think I'll try to find that post and put a link here.

Here we go: Notice that this (http://www.straightbourbon.comhttp://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthreaded.php/Cat/0/Number/37860/an/0/page/0#37860) Riedel glass is not footed.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

kbuzbee
07-27-2005, 14:42
Dave, I saw that post. Followed up on the Reidel site and found (as was said in that thread further down) that there are several different sizes in the same basic style. I think my local beverage-meister carrys things like this. Maybe I'll pop in on him Friday...... I'll let you know how it goes.

Cheers!

Ken

kbuzbee
07-29-2005, 07:39
Hi Dave, well, I did go look at the Reidel "O" series but actually purchased the schott-zwiesel top ten cask aged spirits glass. It's great. I left a more detailed review in the 'Pure Glass by Maison du Whisky' thread. I was a little confused by the way it handled the Laphroaig 10. If anyone has any thoughts on that or opinions on this glass I'd enjoy hearing them.

Cheers,

Ken

atm39
07-29-2005, 15:14
I enjoy using a snifter from time to time, but I personally love a lowball glass. Unfortunately, one out of my set of 4 did not survive a recent move. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

barturtle
08-07-2005, 18:52
I chose the riedel scotch, though I no longer own one (broke three) but my second would be the glencairn (it still lives) haven't tried the bourbon glass yet, and yes I like some others always ask for a snifter when I'm out at a bar

jspero
08-23-2005, 05:37
I chose the lowball glass, mostly because my other choices at home include wine galsses and regular juice glasses. I'm pretty knew to bourbon being a recent convert from JD and I'm not sure the glass will have an impact on the way I enjoy bourbon. Has anyone changed their choice since they first posted based on trying a new glass type?

kbuzbee
08-23-2005, 05:53
I chose the lowball glass, mostly because my other choices at home include wine galsses and regular juice glasses. I'm pretty knew to bourbon being a recent convert from JD and I'm not sure the glass will have an impact on the way I enjoy bourbon. Has anyone changed their choice since they first posted based on trying a new glass type?



Welcome to the forum!!

Yes, if you read above I have. Before trying the Schott Zweisel glass (the one in my avatar) I used a lowball glass as well. It was fine but this glass suites my needs better.

Happy hunting,

Ken

BourbonJoe
08-23-2005, 06:06
Jay,
I think the glass makes a big difference. You will find a lot of differing opinions on this site. I'll give you mine:
Since Bourbon is on par with fine Cognac, and I drink my Bourbon neet (also my Cognac), I prefer a brandy snifter. I find it works well for the way I enjoy bourbon. But, It's all a matter of opinion.
Joe http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/usflag.gif

barturtle
08-23-2005, 08:33
Yes the glass can make a big difference, for example between the riedel scotch and the glencairne scotch. While either work quite well up to about 94 proof or so(for me anyway) above that the rather small opening of the glencairn glass concentrates to alcohol in the nose so much that George T Stagg will almost burn your nose hairs. Whereas the much more open(actually flaring outward) Riedel scotch makes the high alcohol less intrusive allowing the aroma to show better.

I least thats my way of seeing it. As always your milage may vary.

CrispyCritter
08-23-2005, 20:12
My nose is just big enough that it doesn't go all the way into a Glencairn - the tip of my nose hits the rim.

In any case, I've found that even Stagg, or a cask-strength Scotch or Irish, isn't at all unpleasant from a nose point of view, when I'm drinking from a Glencairn.

Then again, I find that the tongue/palate plays a somewhat greater role than the nose, as far as how I enjoy whisky.

I used to use a highball glass with ice, but I've found that I much prefer my pours neat in a Glencairn now. I haven't tried a Riedel glass, though. Lead crystal kind of scares me, especially when combined with high-strength spirits.

kbuzbee
08-24-2005, 10:36
I haven't tried a Riedel glass, though. Lead crystal kind of scares me, especially when combined with high-strength spirits.



Yeah, I know what you mean. That Schott Zwiesel glass I'm using now took out the lead. They used Titanium instead. I don't know enough about glass chemistry to explain that but it is a great glass (and I don't worry about the Titanium reacting with anything - even the soon to be released 141 proof GTS!)

Cheers,

Ken

ratcheer
08-24-2005, 16:12
What little I know about glass is that the lead is what gives lead crystal that "crystal clear", sparkling look.

Also, I do not beleive any damage is done to you over the short time a drink is in a glass, but you are definitely not supposed to store wine or spirits in lead crystal for months. It will definitely absorb some of the lead over extended time periods.

Tim

voigtman
08-24-2005, 16:47
What little I know about glass is that the lead is what gives lead crystal that "crystal clear", sparkling look.

Also, I do not beleive any damage is done to you over the short time a drink is in a glass, but you are definitely not supposed to store wine or spirits in lead crystal for months. It will definitely absorb some of the lead over extended time periods.

Tim



As a chemistry professor, specializing in analytical chemistry, I agree with Tim on all points. The lead content, as "lead oxide", gives the "lead crystal" its high refractive index, which is what makes it "crystal clear and sparkling". Over short periods of time, there is negligible leaching of lead content from a lead crystal glass. But long term storage in a lead crystal decanter would lead to higher lead levels in the liquid in the decanter. I seriously doubt it would cause any problems, but why risk it? I have never seen any studies giving the actual lead levels leached from the lead crystal, but I assume it is somewhere in the scientific literature. Ed V.

pepcycle
08-24-2005, 20:09
As an alchemist, I would add that symmptoms of exposure to lead include:
The need to pre-order GTS from your local merchant
The urge to try different bourbons
Loss of memory, for example, "Do I have a 1994 EWSB? I better pick up one, just in case"
Need to socialize with others about the virtues of yeast excrement.
Uncontrollable (Think Close Encounter of the 3rd Kind) urge to travel to Bardstown in September
If you have any of these symptons, you are likely to be a victim of PICA, lead intoxication.
(You should immediately examine your white blood cells for basophilic stipling)
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/horseshit.gif

kbuzbee
08-25-2005, 08:41
As an alchemist, I would add that symmptoms of exposure to lead include:
The need to pre-order GTS from your local merchant
The urge to try different bourbons
Loss of memory, for example, "Do I have a 1994 EWSB? I better pick up one, just in case"
Need to socialize with others about the virtues of yeast excrement.
Uncontrollable (Think Close Encounter of the 3rd Kind) urge to travel to Bardstown in September
If you have any of these symptons, you are likely to be a victim of PICA, lead intoxication.
(You should immediately examine your white blood cells for basophilic stipling)
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/horseshit.gif



Any of these symptoms?? I have ALL of those symptoms!!! I think I'm clinically dead!

Ken

kbuzbee
08-25-2005, 08:46
What little I know about glass is that the lead is what gives lead crystal that "crystal clear", sparkling look.

Also, I do not beleive any damage is done to you over the short time a drink is in a glass, but you are definitely not supposed to store wine or spirits in lead crystal for months. It will definitely absorb some of the lead over extended time periods.



Ed and Tim, agreed, heavily leaded crystal is beautiful AND, one of the things I've always enjoyed is the clear tone (what my wife and I call 'the clink'). Also a function of the lead if I were to guess.

The Schott glass does a wonderful job at both. They really did a nice job with it. And for a delicate looking glass it actually feels quite solid. I looked at the Reidel 'O' series and had a vision of it shattering in my hand (just call me Mr. Delicate!) Take a look if you get a chance.

Cheers,

Ken

jspero
08-26-2005, 05:26
Thanks for the great replies. I've been inspired to try out a few different glasses to see if I notice any difference.

I think to test the concept correctly, though, I'm going to have to try each brand brand in each glass. Maybe more than once. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Jay

kbuzbee
08-26-2005, 07:01
Thanks for the great replies. I've been inspired to try out a few different glasses to see if I notice any difference.

I think to test the concept correctly, though, I'm going to have to try each brand brand in each glass. Maybe more than once. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Jay



That's absolutely true. Aside from differences in the Bourbons and differences in the glasses you'll find (at least I do) things seem different on different days. Depends on what you had for dinner, how the weather is, etc, etc.... Doing the research is the fun part, for sure. Most people here (me included) enjoy different glassware for different moods and different environments. 90% of the time I'll choose the Schott glass, 8% Wild Turkey lowball and 2% amount the other 8 glasses I have. That is for neat. For Kentucky Iced Tea I use a hiball glass.

Have fun,

Ken http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

mash
11-10-2005, 19:57
There is one glass in my bar reserved for drinking bourbon neat. It is a pre-Civil War mold-blown whiskey tumbler. These were the everyday glassware used in the bars/saloons in the mid 1800s. Although it has many flaws (read character) from the cast iron mold it was pressed in I am amazed that after kicking around for 150 years it is still crystal clear and has no cracks or chips. The perfect tool for the job.

Cheers, Alan

Edward_call_me_Ed
11-10-2005, 21:34
Sounds like a great glass. Do you have any pictures of it?
Ed

mash
11-11-2005, 17:52
I can't seem to post a picture, so here's a link.

1850s flint mold-blown whiskey tumbler (http://ca.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/adgreen@rogers.com/detail?.dir=466f&.dnm=5919.jpg&.src=ph)

Cheers, Alan

Edward_call_me_Ed
11-12-2005, 02:13
Thanks for going to all the trouble. I really envy your flint mold-blown lead glass whiskey tumbler.
Ed

dougdog
11-16-2005, 14:32
Alan, I'm impressed with the history of your glass, thanks for the photo.

To satisfy my curiosity, what are the tel-tale signs that this glass is 150 years old? Can you explain what a molded glass is/was compared to other alternatives for making glassware in that period?

If I were to look for one at an estate sale or second hand store, how would I know it if I found one?

I appreciate your help.

Thanks,

Best regards, dougdog

mash
11-16-2005, 18:01
dougdog,

"Flint Glass" is a term for glassware with a lead content that is pressed into a cast iron mold. In the United States “Flint Glass” was only produced prior to the Civil War as lead was reserved for the manufacture of ammunition at the start of the war. Pieces with lead content are quite heavy and have a bell sound or ring when you “ping” the glass with your finger. The cast iron molds would crack after many uses, but were still used. These cracks were transposed onto the glass during the forming process and show up as fine lines on the outside of the glass. There may also some defects on the inside of the glass for the same reason. I bought this glass from an antique dealer who specializes in glass.

Regards, Alan

ratcheer
11-27-2005, 08:16
I don't have either of those, and mine don't look like a barrel, either. Mine seem to be a fourth version. Mine were purchased (in an RB Christmas bonus package) two years ago.

Tim

kbuzbee
11-27-2005, 09:39
Do you have a picture, Tim??

Ken

ratcheer
11-27-2005, 12:42
Not right now, maybe a little later.

Tim

TimmyBoston
06-14-2006, 03:28
I am currently divided between two glasses, one being the Riedel Cognac Hennessy glass and the Riedel Single Malt Whisky glass (Riedel Scotch). I nearly always use the later for Scotch. Like many people've posted it does minimize the nose, but I've always preferred the nose of bourbon to the nose of scotch so that's not as important to me and the payoff comes in the improved taste over a lowball, IMO.
For bourbon, I prefer the Cognac glass, I know its not strictly intented for bourbon, but I find it does a great job of emphasizing the nose, while minimizing the odor of alcohol. I can hold the glass completely up to my face, as you would to nose a glass of wine, even with Stagg and fully enjoy the aroma without any burn and the curved lip helps me savor the wonderful flavor. Only for the oaky, full-bodied bourbons do I use my Scotch glass, ie the older van winkles.
If you're in the market for a new glass to enhance your enjoyment, I highly recommend picking up the Riedel Cognac Hennessy glass, I picked up one from the vinum collection for around $15 and I am very happy with my purchase.

photogjunkie
06-15-2006, 08:38
I'll chime in on this old thread. I use a cool glass which I picked up a dozen of this year at Ross (if you have this chain in your area). Made in Italy by Borgonovo each glass has a capacity of 160cc or 5 5/8oz. The way they are designed, you can tell exactly if you pour an oz or two oz in the bowl in the bottom. The handle fits two fingers perfectly, and your hand can cup the glass to warm the bourbon if desired. The cost was all of $10 for a set of 6 out the door. If you have a Ross store near you, go check, it saw some last week around here. The box says Diamant and as I said it is made by Borgonovo in Italy, They are closed out, but I checked out their website and they still make the same thing which is now called Tazzina Sunshine. Look here...

http://www.borgonovo.it/inglese/catalogo_frame.asp?view=ok&id_cat=3

and go to coffee and tea section and search for Tazzina Sunshine.

The best glass I've every used...why pay more.

bluesbassdad
11-21-2006, 01:20
Thanks for the tip. It's amazing how much perfectly functional glassware is available that doesn't carry a fancy name/price.

I keep hoping I'll find the perfect bourbon glass, even though I don't know exactly what I'm looking for. I know that the Glencairn taster's glass feels odd in my hand and is too narrow at the top for comfortable sipping. Same for the Riedel bourbon glass. Most lowball glasses are too big for my taste when drinking bourbon neat.

A quick check of the yellow pages reveals that there's even a Ross store in nearby Prescott. I hope to pay them a visit soon.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

TimmyBoston
11-23-2006, 00:05
My favorite glass is the Riedel Cognac Hennessy Glass from their Vinum collection. It runs about 15 dollars and was initially designed for VS and VSOP cognacs but I find it works remarkably well with bourbon. Definately my favorite glass.

3443

Click on the image for a larger picture.

Dramiel McHinson
11-24-2006, 16:59
I believe that good whisky should be properly glassed. Like pistols and pocket knives, one size doesn't fit all for my tastes. If I'm just nosing, I like to use a Reidel aperitif glass with proper bowl and tapered rim. It uses less than an ounce and concentrates the nose well for me. If I'm nosing and tasting I like the new Reidel wine glass without the stem. The bottom is thin to allow the hand to warm the whisky and it has the proper bowl with tapered rim to concentrate the nose. For drinking I like the scotch glass with slight bowl, short stem, and tulip rim. I get far less whisky on my shirt later in the evening with this glass. In emergencies, I'll use my cupped hands, a mason jar, the wife's Waterford crystal rose vase or a nearly empty Campbells soup can. I once used a ladle for some freshly distilled stuff in an ammo can but that was an aberation in my normal routine. I regularly used an MRE polyethelene bag for my daily tent ration of home brew in the Gulf War and grew to like the great qualities it imparted on the spirit. It held a good quantity and could be shaped into any style you chose. The only requirement was to filter the sand out with your teeth prior to swallowing. I suppose in the end if it gets it to your lips and none is spilled then success is at hand.

Thesh
12-06-2006, 18:10
I generally prefer a snifter, but often use a lowball glass as well. If it is going to be on the rocks, then it is always a lowball.

ILLfarmboy
12-11-2006, 15:50
I voted "snifter", but sometimes use a reidel bourbon glass or lowball.

contrary to what seems popular for high proof whiskies like Stagg and Bookers I almost always use a snifter. It seems to give me better controll over just how big a sip I take and where in my mouth it lands. Stagg down the wrong pipe ain't fun.

I generally drink while waching TV in my favorite chair in a semi-reclined position so this may have something to do with it.

cowdery
12-19-2006, 22:23
I very rarely use a snifter. I find that when I'm intending to take notes and consciously "taste" something, or when I'm having something for the first time or something I haven't had in a long time, I use a nosing glass. Otherwise I use a standard rocks glass.

I also have some odd v-shaped glasses (got them from Appleton Rum) that I use sometimes, mainly because they give me the illusion, due to their shape, that the pour is more generous than it really is.

Gillman
12-20-2006, 00:38
I only use a rocks glass. A smaller size suits since I do not use ice (and rarely water), usually one of the distillery distributions obtained at Sampler and similar events. I prefer one that is clear glass and not etched, cut or otherwise obscured in any way.

Gary

shaggy
12-26-2006, 22:32
I got a Riedel bourbon glass for X-mas and I really love it! I also got 2 medium crystal snifters. I have yet to try one of the snifters as I cannot put down the bourbon glass. I had been drinking neat pours out of the Bulleit and Four Roses bourbon glasses that I got at the KBF this year. I really like the Bulleit glasses (as seen in this picture) for their size and weight. http://cocktailatlas.com/Bulleit_Bourbon/BulleitBottleGlass.jpg

LBTRS
01-16-2007, 13:03
I'm new to this and just ordered the Riedel Bourbon glasses but do like the looks for the Blenders Mixing Glass. Looking forward to being able to determin what glass I like.

BourbonJoe
02-01-2007, 05:57
To see if there was any difference in the nose of bourbon in different size brandy snifters, we poured Old Grandad BiB into 7 1/2 ounce, 30 ounce and 225 ounce (big enought to stick your head into) snifters. Everyone detected a difference. Some picked the "giant" snifter as presenting the best aroma while one or two picked the 30 ounce snifter as being the best. Nobody picked the small (7 1/2 ounce) snifter.
Joe :usflag:

Edward_call_me_Ed
02-01-2007, 07:15
To see if there was any difference in the nose of bourbon in different size brandy snifters, we poured Old Grandad BiB into 7 1/2 ounce, 30 ounce and 225 ounce (big enought to stick your head into) snifters. Everyone detected a difference. Some picked the "giant" snifter as presenting the best aroma while one or two picked the 30 ounce snifter as being the best. Nobody picked the small (7 1/2 ounce) snifter.
Joe :usflag:

Now that is interesting! I have always found smaller glasses to be too intense alcohol-wise. Why do people want to concentrate the aromas? That always burns the hair out of my nose! I find myself blowing into my glass or waving my hand over it to thin things down so I can actually smell it without hurting myself.

Ed

bluesbassdad
02-17-2007, 12:05
I have the same motivation when I experiment by holding the glass varying distances from my nose. I wonder whether the effect is the same?

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

TBoner
02-17-2007, 18:34
I actually do enjoy concentrating the aromas via use of a snifter, and a snifter is my preferred vessel, but I also vary the distance I hold a glass from my nose, and I can detect certain aromas at a great distance from my glass (like vanilla or, with ryes, cinnamon), while others are only apparent with a more intent focus (such as dried fruit or tobacco).

Generally, I use a snifter the first time I pour a particular bourbon to really focus on tasting and smelling. Thereafter, it depends on my mood. I usually use a lowball glass, but I have a couple of small highball glasses I like because small pours appear quite large in the narrower cylinder.

ILLfarmboy
02-17-2007, 20:52
OK. This might sound strange but this is how I "nose" using a snifter. First I hold the glass a few inches from my nose gently inhale deeply but slowly, (this saves nose hairs from being "scorched". Then I move the glass forward away from my face while I exhale. Then bringing it back to my nose (varying the distance depending on the proof) Inhale again. Repeat the process. Then take a sip.

domajoju56
03-15-2007, 23:55
First timer here, Hi all, I purchased 2 bottles of bourbon today, Woodford Reserve & Elijah Craig 12yo, on the way home from the liq-outlet I stopped at a local 'Dollar Store' I picked up 5 very nice glasses, I like a medium weight glass those thin ones always seem to break when I hurl them into the kitchen sink from the living room ( kidding ) and the heavy ones, well thats just not my style, I like my glasses very plain and simple nothing fancy and the best part is 5 glasses for $5.00 you can't beat that with a baseball bat, long ago a photographer told me that a good photographer can take a good picture with any kind of camera, but can be more inspired when working with the best equipment, so if using a special glass to enhance your experience when tasting bourbon works for you, I say go for it. hey you only live once. Night All.

Mark

smokinjoe
03-16-2007, 07:11
I hope there aren't any employees of Hilton Hotels reading this, but my favorite "go to" glasses are a couple that found their way into my luggage after staying at various Hiltons. :blush: Not the standard old fashion glass that are usually in hotels. They're smaller, kinda like a juice glasses. Nice heavy bottom, smooth sides. I find them perfect for casual drinking. Plus, if I break one....well, you know what I mean. ;) But, if it's a special occasion, I go with the Reidel O's or Reidel bourbon glass.

Cheers!

JOE

Martian
04-21-2007, 12:49
I just got a set of Riedel Bourbon Glasses. I really like them. They fit nicely and securely in the hand. They are less likely to slip out of the hand like lowball glasses. Only time will tell how durable they are. They are also a little smaller than I expected.

whiskeyhatch
04-27-2007, 18:11
I'll have to place my vote for the Riedels. Although, there will always be a special place for my lowball glasses.

blux
06-04-2007, 20:10
I'm with CL. I use a lowball glass because I am not olfactorily agile enough to discern subtle differences in the aromas. I usually work on the taste first and then try to determine if I can pick out what I am tasting in the aroma. Don't get me wrong, I do smell the bourbon first because... well... it smells good. But that's as far as I can go, except for the obvious aroma of alcohol and sometimes char, I can also sometimes smell cherries. As far as vanilla, carmel, coffe cake or anything like that, I'm still working on it. Unless I'm smelling some things and don't know what to call them.

pepcycle
06-06-2007, 09:27
I've been using a set of Bodum double wall, So Long Stemless Red Wine Tumblers for bourbon for about 4 months.
I am still undecicded on their practicality and benefits vs the Riedels.
If you thought the Riedels were fragile, wait till you handle these. I cringe every time I drop an ice cube into one.
Haven't risked automated dishwashing yet.
Love the "no sweat" feature of double wall and how long ice lasts in a drink.
I don't find an advantage over the Riedels from a sensory perspective and find the thin glass awkwardly thick because of the double wall. I also find the weight, too light considering the bulk. Its deceiving.

Now, the real eye-opener for me is using these for Red Wine.
Holy Mackeral. I love them. You can swirl and sniff. No clumsy stems. Doesn't transfer heat or cool to the beverage.
I guess that's why they call them wine tumblers and not spirit tumblers.
Anybody else have experience with these

SO LONG
stemless all-purpose double wall wine glass, set of 2 pcs (http://www.bodumusa.com/shop/line.asp?MD=4&GID=71&LID=505&HID=10397&#37;2D10&CHK=&SLT=&mscssid=F1BUK6DDDLHM8GBFD9MP5BDCMCKEBK49)

4.5 in high / dia. 4.5 in (0.5 liter, 16 oz.)

PS: I got them as a "going away" gift from a co-worker, so I don't know the market price. This web site is out of stock on them. They seem pretty pricey in comparison to most glassware.


http://www.bodumusa.com/shop/images_redesign/spacer.gif

scratchline
06-06-2007, 10:46
I recently purchased a set of these:

http://www.amazon.com/Iittala-Stella-White-Wine-Glasses/dp/B0000CAQHO/ref=sr_1_3/102-5700958-3017743?ie=UTF8&s=kitchen&qid=1181150289&sr=1-3

I had seen them at the MOMA gift shop in NYC and they are a little more substantial than the Reidel O's. Since my storage is so limited, I thought they would serve triple duty as whiskey, cocktail, and wine glasses. On one website I noticed that they were actually sold as whiskey glasses.

That said I was thinking of picking these up:

http://www.amazon.com/iittala-Stella-Sherry-Set-2/dp/B0001CKEGM/ref=sr_1_5/102-5700958-3017743?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1181151709&sr=1-5

as well. They're perfect for neat sipping.

Lead-free Finnish crystal. Good weight. Stylish enough for the Museum of Modern Art. Not bad.

-Mike

barturtle
06-06-2007, 22:10
The sherry glass seems perfect, if a little pricey...but you gotta pay for prestige, I guess. Though looking at it's size, I think I'd have the same issue I have with Glencairn glasses...I can't get my nose in to sniff while I sip...Thats why I like the Riedel SM Scotch glass, the wide mouth and roller lip, lets me catch the aroma the same time I catch the flavor...though I've broken 4 of those and not one of the Glencairn...

wskybnt
07-01-2007, 07:29
I have the ridel bourbon glasses, and like them a lot. I like the Glencairn glasses a little better. Both are night and day over tumblers. I just ordered but, haven't received this Johnson Tot glass yet. I'll let you know how I like it after it gets here.

http://www.maltadvocate.com/active_content/Marketplace.asp

Martian
09-20-2007, 09:51
The Riedel Bourbon glass was designed by Bourbon makers to sip Bourbon.
http://www.cigaraficionado.com/Cigar/CA_Features/CA_Feature_Basic_Template/0,2344,622,00.html

gblick
09-20-2007, 21:48
I'm not sure why I deleted my earlier post, but here goes again.

I've always thought that the Reidels were too pricey and also a bit too thin and delicate.

I have found what I believe to be the perfect glass for sipping bourbon. It's like a miniature wine glass, holds 4 ounces, and has a stem length that just seems to make it rest perfectly in my hand. When I take a sip the aroma hits my nose right at about the time the juice hits my lips, and the thicker glass just seems more manly to me, I've yet to break one.

I found these glasses at World Market for only $2.49 each. They are not on their website and they may very well be discontinued, but there are still some to be found at at least one of the locations here in Houston. I'd urge anyone to check their local World Market for this glass and give it a try.

Luna56
10-01-2007, 21:41
There are three glasses I normally use for bourbon. I like the Glencairn nosing glass a lot, very classy (got a bunch at the Bourbon Heritage Center last month). Also use these glasses that used to come with Remy Martin cognac around Christmas time, kind of a slightly bowl shaped tumbler. The glass is just a little thin but it's an easy glass to hold. The one I'm using tonight is a glass I got with a bottle of Macallan scotch last year, and I'm liking it more and more. It's basically a heavy bottomed tumbler but the sides are curved towards the top so that the lip is smaller in circumferance than the base. It's got the best attributes of a tumbler (large diameter base, a hefty handful of a glass) coupled with a slightly snifter-like quality in the inward curving lip, which concentrated the aromas very nicely. I love the noser's glass, but I think that having a bit more surface area on the bottom of the glass gives me a bit more nose from the bourbon. Here's a link if you want to see pictures of the glass (I'm not sure how to make a link, you may have to copy/paste the text). http://www.themacallan.com/shop/detail.asp?pid=GX6639A

Anybody seen anything like this for sale in the US? Anybody got one they wouldn't mind parting with? I'm finding myself really appreciating this glass. I'd even buy another bottle of Macallan just to get another glass!
Cheers!

PS- I just checked the link, it's a little squirrely but it will get you to the site. Just click on "merchandise" and click on "tumblers" and you'll see it. Really nice glass. Thanks for bearing with me. Hope to read some comments soon.

Xibalba
11-09-2007, 09:26
When I first started drinking bourbon, I got a cheap glass for $1 that bulged at the bottom, narrowed near the top, then flared out a little. I lost it a while back and haven't seen anything like it again. I think it was the best tool for tasting bourbon, as the snifters or any other glass that concentrates the nose ends up just focusing the alcohol to the detriment of the other notes, IMHO. I believe, without any science to back this up, that the flare helps the really important, non-alcohol aspects of the nose to come out.

Also: if anyone has a link for something like I described, I'll be your best friend... I'd really like to get one of those glasses again!

gothbat
11-09-2007, 18:37
Perhaps the 5th item down on this page (http://www.maltadvocate.com/active_content/Marketplace.asp) is what you're looking for? (Or at least something similar?) They look nice but I've always avoided them because of the price.

Mashface
02-19-2008, 10:44
I just bought 1 Riedel bourbon glass last night on ebay. I had been using a lowball glass but this sounds better. Can't wait till it comes.

Hondo
02-08-2009, 08:01
I have been thinking some about glassware recently and thus thought I might update this ancient thread with my thoughts.

I seem to gravitate towards one of the three kinds of glasses that I keep on hand depending on the situation.

I have a set of Glencairn glasses that I really like and I enjoy sipping bourbon neat from these. This is usually what I reach for on a daily basis.

I also have a set of heavy rocks glasses that I got in a WT101 gift set that I really like. If I am drinking on the rocks or mixed with something, this is usually what I have. I like the heft of the glass.

I saw just a few mentions of shot glasses through this thread and it appears that most folks don't care much for them. I have a set of heavy tapered shot glasses that I like. They are pretty large for a shot glass and have a two oz capacity. I sometimes have a small pour in one of these and do use them on occasion. However I don't care for the smaller, thinner and or shorter shot glasses. Matter of fact just a couple of nights ago I ordered some Don Julio while out for dinner and it was served in a short thin shot glass that I really didn't care for. The place was real busy or I might have asked them to change it.

spun_cookie
02-08-2009, 08:14
For referance, here are the images of the glasses in question here (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showpost.php?p=17947&postcount=1)

Is it posible to vote a poll 1, 2, 3? Like Pick your top three?

I would go Glencairn, Reidel Bourbon, Reidel Scotch on a 1, 2, 3.

Blitz
02-08-2009, 15:07
I have the Modern Marvels "Whiskey" episode on DVR. I watched it this morning just for the purpose of noting which glasses are used for tasting by those featured on the show.

Fred Noe (Jim Beam) used what looked like the Riedel Bourbon Glass. John Hansell (Malt Advocate) was noted using a stemless wine glass (merlot glass?) and what looked like a stemless Scotch glass.

The most prevalent glass just looked like a wine glass, a little smaller maybe, and a thicker stem, but not one of our choices in the poll. These were from scenes at Jack Daniels, Jameson, Glenlevet, etc..

Thought that was interesting. My favorites are a small snifter I got at Jim Beam, and a mini rock glass from Buffalo Trace.

kickert
02-08-2009, 16:01
The most prevalent glass just looked like a wine glass, a little smaller maybe, and a thicker stem, but not one of our choices in the poll. These were from scenes at Jack Daniels, Jameson, Glenlevet, etc..


These seem to be the tasting glasses used on the distillery floor. Every time I have been served White Dog, or seen it served, or seen a distiller take a taste froma barrel, these mini wine glasses seem to be used. They often have horizontal lines on them.... at least that is my experiance.

Dramiel McHinson
02-09-2009, 20:13
The most prevalent glass just looked like a wine glass, a little smaller maybe, and a thicker stem, but not one of our choices in the poll. These were from scenes at Jack Daniels, Jameson, Glenlevet, etc..



One of my other bad habits is collecting glassware that isn't ashamed of being used. The wine glass used by most blenders and master tasters/distillers is a port copita. These range in size of 6 to 8 oz. I received a pair from Mario Andretti's winery that are 4 oz in size and they are perfect for enjoying a good bourbon as well as certain ports.

I like the port copitas and prefer the smaller ones when tasting only an ounce or two of bourbon. The newer Reidels and Glencairns have the same effect on the nose. I also have many two ounce size glasses to include shot glasses that are great for just pouring a small amount to enjoy without worrying too much about analyzing the spirit.

If I'm serious about exploring a bourbon, I use a glass very similar to a Glencairn except it is very thin crystal and is stemed. It comes with a fitted cap. I pour 25 to 50 ml into the glass, swirl it to check the legs then cap it for no more than a few minutes. This concentrates the aromas for a good nose. After a few notes and a taste, I add a few drops of filtered water to crack the spirit. Swirl, cap, repeat.....After a while I long into this great website and make an ass out of myself and regret it in the morning. That night, swirl, cap, repeat....:drink:

I don't begrudge anyone their glass unless its empty.

Buffalo Bill
02-25-2009, 07:22
For referance, here are the images of the glasses in question here (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showpost.php?p=17947&postcount=1)

Is it posible to vote a poll 1, 2, 3? Like Pick your top three?

I would go Glencairn, Reidel Bourbon, Reidel Scotch on a 1, 2, 3.

*The only glass I've had absolutely no luck with is the #3 Reidell Scotch. I like the shape and feel, but for Bourbon it just doesn't cut it, also for Scotch I find #2 more successful in scoring finer characteristics.

BB

scratchline
02-25-2009, 16:46
Bought a set of these for my scotch drinking brother for Christmas and finally got to see them the other day:

http://www.ravenscroftcrystal.com/collections/distiller_glass/W5475.html#

They are fantastic. I prefer them to the Johnson whiskey tots I have. Heavier and wider. Could easily accommodate a rock or two if you're so inclined.

-Mike

bourbonguyjapan
02-27-2009, 02:42
I used to use the container from a sake glass.
It had a V-shape and was decent, and could hold a piece of ice
on the top while I drank the whisk(e)y from underneath.
It broke though.
Over time I have gone from cheap snifter to Riedel to Glen Carn.
I have an Okinawan shot glass, WT tumblers, and a 4 Roses tumbler.
While I like the Glencarn the best, I will use the other ones in times of comparison.
I really want an American White Oak wooden shot glass, or cup.
Preferably from barrel wood which I will make and char myself;
the inspiration being from a wooden sake cup that I have-
Kind of a less bullshit approach to drinking and nosing.
Simple drinking. Very zen. Very much the way I feel drinking bourbon should be!

Buffalo Bill
02-27-2009, 10:56
My favorite glass is the Riedel Cognac Hennessy Glass from their Vinum collection. It runs about 15 dollars and was initially designed for VS and VSOP cognacs but I find it works remarkably well with bourbon. Definately my favorite glass.

3443

Click on the image for a larger picture.

I agree, this is my favorite glass so far... BB

Pieface
03-11-2009, 19:48
I'm drinking out of low ball glasses but I just traded my straight sided glasses for a low ball with a very similar profile to the reidel bourbon glass with it's gentle inwards slope.

funknik
04-24-2009, 03:59
I'm really conflicted on glassware . . . while I think I get a better understanding and appreciation of the flavors in whiskey from the Glencairn or over-sized snifter I have. For comfort and style, I just love the rocks glass . . . it doesn't tip easy, it's not as fragile, it's easy to hang onto and it reminds me of the cool guys from old movies. If I'm tasting (i.e. writing notes, etc.) or drinking high class grog, then I'll use the snifter or Glencairn, but for everyday sipping of everyday whiskey, I gotta pick the lowball, highball or rocks.

fishnbowljoe
04-24-2009, 07:28
I'm really conflicted on glassware . . . while I think I get a better understanding and appreciation of the flavors in whiskey from the Glencairn or over-sized snifter I have. For comfort and style, I just love the rocks glass . . . it doesn't tip easy, it's not as fragile, it's easy to hang onto and it reminds me of the cool guys from old movies. If I'm tasting (i.e. writing notes, etc.) or drinking high class grog, then I'll use the snifter or Glencairn, but for everyday sipping of everyday whiskey, I gotta pick the lowball, highball or rocks.

Ditto Andy. You're not alone. First taste or just sipping, Glencairn. Nice sized pour or with coke etc, rocks glass. Joe

spun_cookie
04-24-2009, 07:54
I'm really conflicted on glassware . . . while I think I get a better understanding and appreciation of the flavors in whiskey from the Glenclairn or over-sized snifter I have. For comfort and style, I just love the rocks glass . . . it doesn't tip easy, it's not as fragile, it's easy to hang onto and it reminds me of the cool guys from old movies. If I'm tasting (i.e. writing notes, etc.) or drinking high class grog, then I'll use the snifter or Glenclairn, but for everyday sipping of everyday whiskey, I gotta pick the lowball, highball or rocks.


Ditto Andy. You're not alone. First taste or just sipping, Glencairn. Nice sized pour or with coke etc, rocks glass. Joe

Ahh my young Padawans, you will learn the ways of the force and give up your trivial ways and move into a higher plain or bourbon existence

You loose so much in a rocks/highball glass that you might as well be drinking MM or ant Beam product. Stay low shelf for those large mouth aroma loosing vessels.

OscarV
04-24-2009, 08:14
Ahh my young Padawans, you will learn the ways of the force and give up your trivial ways and move into a higher plain or bourbon existence



Ahh, my Master Green Gem, please keep sharing your secrects.
If I may be so bold to ask you this.
My favorite way to enjoy the Nectar Of Kentucky is via a half pint bottle carried in the hip pocket of my jeans.
Does this pass my Master?

spun_cookie
04-24-2009, 08:38
Ahh, my Master Green Gem, please keep sharing your secrects.
If I may be so bold to ask you this.
My favorite way to enjoy the Nectar Of Kentucky is via a half pint bottle carried in the hip pocket of my jeans.
Does this pass my Master?

With only chared oak straw you use Master Highttower :D

"No, try not. Do or do not, there is no try"

Klepackage
04-24-2009, 10:27
I'm really conflicted on glassware . . . while I think I get a better understanding and appreciation of the flavors in whiskey from the Glencairn or over-sized snifter I have. For comfort and style, I just love the rocks glass . . . it doesn't tip easy, it's not as fragile, it's easy to hang onto and it reminds me of the cool guys from old movies. If I'm tasting (i.e. writing notes, etc.) or drinking high class grog, then I'll use the snifter or Glencairn, but for everyday sipping of everyday whiskey, I gotta pick the lowball, highball or rocks.

Cut any paste Andy's response for my own. I've got a smaller than average rocks glass which I use whenever I'm just drinking for bourbon's sake. Anytime I serious about it, I'll use the Glencairn.

As a glass, I don't really care for the Glencairn though. It doesn't sit in my hand as well as a rock glass, it's a pain to clean, and it's harder to drink out of when I want mah drink!

troyce
04-28-2009, 14:16
I'm not that picky on glassware and , like my taste in bourbon , preferences change by the week, but for now , the glass given at the Sampler by Woodford Reserve is a favorite. It's a short, curved lowball design with a thick base. Very different and very stable.

callmeox
04-29-2009, 09:48
My normal vessel is the small, round based Four Roses glasses that they use at the tastings (and gave away at the Sampler this year). I did pick up a pair of Riedel bourbon glasses on my way home Sunday but I've been under the weather since Monday night and I've not had a chance to give them a try.

kickert
04-29-2009, 12:44
My normal vessel is the small, round based Four Roses glasses that they use at the tastings (and gave away at the Sampler this year). I did pick up a pair of Riedel bourbon glasses on my way home Sunday but I've been under the weather since Monday night and I've not had a chance to give them a try.

I like these as well. Corsair was doing a local event and 4R was there as well. Free pours of SmB and SB and a complementary glass. I had 3 drinks just so I could have a set of 4 glasses (I already had one from the tour).

bonneamie
04-29-2009, 20:04
I'm not that picky on glassware and , like my taste in bourbon , preferences change by the week, but for now , the glass given at the Sampler by Woodford Reserve is a favorite. It's a short, curved lowball design with a thick base. Very different and very stable.

Funny you should mention that, Liz and I were just saying tonight that was our favorite glass, it's so hand-friendly.

Single-Barrel
06-04-2009, 08:12
I use the blenders glass about 95% of the time I put about 30ml in and let her sit awhile to open up (add a drop or two water sometimes). The other 5% is for very special/rare whisk(e)y and I use the Micheal Jackson taste glass with lid (its #2 with a glass lid)

ebo
08-08-2009, 16:30
Being a Scotch drinker for a good number of years, I use a Glencairn for all whiskies. It has a good sized bowl, and a nice shape that concentrates the nose well enough. I also like the heft of the glass... it doesn't feel like I need to handle it with kid gloves. I do have a favorite crystal highball glass that I like quite bit too. Obviously, it doesn't do much for the nose, but, when I'm "just drinking" :cool: I like it for "ease of use". :grin:

ebo
08-08-2009, 16:39
I have since got one of those Riedel "Small Batch Bourbon" glasses and despite the fact it looks to the contrary, it really does enhance the bourbonic experience. Sadly the dogs knocked it out of the strainer today and it buster, so I need another one soon.


The glass I would really like to get my hands on to try is the Pure glass by Maison du whisky, as suggested previously in this forum. It looks to me like a great melding of the Old-Fashioned style glass with a more specific, snifter-tasting-style glass. I am really curious about how effective this mutation is.


Tom (Bleah) C

I really want one of these glasses. I have looked in every store I've been in, and had my wife look wherever she's at... no luck. Do you know where I can get one?

ebo
08-08-2009, 17:04
The Scotch malt whisky society glasses are my favourite. Everything seems to taste great out of them even Scotch http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

That's because Scotch is great! :stickpoke: ... :D

theDon
08-12-2009, 13:57
I chose low-ball. I actually sip out of an oversized shot-glass from the San Antonio zoo more often. It is rounded like a rocks glass and almost bowl like. Works great and it's about a shot and a half. A couple of those a night and I'm good to go.

jburlowski
08-13-2009, 14:29
I really want one of these glasses. I have looked in every store I've been in, and had my wife look wherever she's at... no luck. Do you know where I can get one?

Try:
http://www.amazon.com/Riedel-Ouverture-Bourbon-Glasses-Set/dp/B00021YHP6

or

https://glassware.riedel.com/c-864-ouverture/p-249-bourbon-glass

onmytrack
09-17-2009, 20:48
I always go with the low-ball glass. This is what my Dad always used. I have seen the Riedel bourbon glasses, but hadn't given it much thought. Not sure why, I have a bar full of Riedel wine glasses (over 20 in 4 sizes). I guess I need to buy some Riedel bourbon glasses and give them a try. Until then it is the low-ball glass.

Jim

ODaniel
09-22-2009, 20:49
I just can't see the rationalization for buying a crazy expensive glass. Granted I'm a newbie, I don't see how crystal would be better than cheap glass. I do understand shape plays a part. I just got one of these smaller wine tumblers for like $1.39. Sized up next to my collection of pint glasses I got for free for ordering pitchers at the pub.

http://www.surrealstudio.net/Beer/glasses.jpg

unclebunk
09-23-2009, 08:29
Being a Scotch drinker for a good number of years, I use a Glencairn for all whiskies. It has a good sized bowl, and a nice shape that concentrates the nose well enough. I also like the heft of the glass... it doesn't feel like I need to handle it with kid gloves. I do have a favorite crystal highball glass that I like quite bit too. Obviously, it doesn't do much for the nose, but, when I'm "just drinking" :cool: I like it for "ease of use". :grin:

My sentiments exactly. I bounce back and forth between a few different Glencairn glasses that I own, but most often use the one that came with the Old Forester Repeal of Prohibition Bourbon. I occasionally use a highball glass at parties or while watching football with my buddies because the likelihood of breaking one of my Glencairns goes up a notch or two due to somewhat heavier consumption of whiskey and beer.

Can someone familiar with both the Glencairn and the Riedel bourbon glasses compare and contrast them for me? I've been meaning to try one of the Riedel glasses but the wider opening on top has prevented me from purchasing one, as I always felt that it would allow more of the nose to escape. Any thoughts?