PDA

View Full Version : Whisky Storage Temperature?



DW2012
02-03-2013, 15:18
Hi, everyone,

We like to keep our home cool (64-68F) and comfortably humid (45-50%).

Presently, I'm keeping some of our whisky stored upright in a basement closet. The temperature in the closet is a few degrees cooler than the room at (55-56F).

At this temperature range of 55F-60F, the whisky is fine, correct? I've read that wine storage is around this temperature, so I figure it's OK.

Thanks!

DW

Tico
02-03-2013, 15:22
I don't see any problems with cool temps. I store mine upright in cardboard boxes in my wine cellar. Temp is around 57 with humidity 70%+.

If anything, the high humidity helps keep the corks in good shape.

squire
02-03-2013, 15:53
Those conditions are fine DW, whisky is very stable and not subject to change after it's bottled. It actually does not need the same care as wine and should do fine in an indoor closet.

ethangsmith
02-03-2013, 16:26
Whiskey is pretty tolerant. I store mine between 65-85 degrees (We keep our house cool in the winter and warm in the summer to save on oil and electric.) and it's never had an issue.

DW2012
02-03-2013, 16:44
Whiskey is pretty tolerant. I store mine between 65-85 degrees (We keep our house cool in the winter and warm in the summer to save on oil and electric.) and it's never had an issue.

Thanks, everyone. Yeah, we keep it cool during our Canadian winter and the same in summer (with about the same humidity level).

The bunker is expanding with recent acquisitions, so I was forced to begin storing in this previously mentioned closet.

Cheers,
DW

Smokewagon
02-04-2013, 11:57
Thanks, everyone. Yeah, we keep it cool during our Canadian winter and the same in summer (with about the same humidity level).

The bunker is expanding with recent acquisitions, so I was forced to begin storing in this previously mentioned closet.

Cheers,
DW

I'm currently having the same problem (First world problem?). Primary storage is full, so everything else goes into a back hall/stairway at the moment. It's normally closed off and never really used, so it can get down into the 40's in the winter, probably pushin 90+ in the summer. Haven't noticed any i'll effects this winter so far. Everything is still tasty, and comes pre-chilled If i'm grabbing anything out there for cocktails.

~SW

squire
02-04-2013, 12:23
Ah yes, the seasonal refrigerator. Guys I doubt a range of 40 to 90 degrees would do any harm, I kept cases of whisky in a closet in my closed garage for decades without any noticeable shift in the quality of the whisky.

WAINWRIGHT
02-04-2013, 17:12
I have only seen one adverse effect and this was due to extreme heat,whereas a Willett that was in my vehicle during the summer for several hours cracked its wax and the cork had shifted upwards.I brought this bottle inside to cool and moisture began form on the inside neck area of the bottle,I opened it several weeks later because of the moisture concern which never dissipated and the cork had started to mold.The whiskey inside was fine and I did switch corks,these are truly extreme conditions but heat more than cold would be my fear.

scubadoo97
02-04-2013, 17:25
Yes heat would be my biggest fear. I'm in central Fla and anything outside or non air conditioned just scares me with corks. Screw caps, no problem even in 90+ degree heat

squire
02-04-2013, 18:10
I forget to add all my corked bottles were kept inside in my wine cellar, which was not actually a cellar, rather a walk in panty off my kitchen.

Bourbon Boiler
02-05-2013, 03:29
Storing in a freezer can create some issues for the corks, but as long as you avoid this kind of extreme you should be fine. The barrels saw a range of probably 10-100 F, so the liquid is hard to damage.

squire
02-05-2013, 07:28
Good point, it's doubtful any of us will ever subject the whisky to the extreme temperatures it has already weathered.

squire
02-05-2013, 07:31
Come to think of it, the barrels stored in the top tiers of a warehouse probably reach a temperature a good bit higher than 100 degrees.

higgins
02-05-2013, 08:56
Come to think of it, the barrels stored in the top tiers of a warehouse probably reach a temperature a good bit higher than 100 degrees.

The barrels definitely see a wide variety of temperatures, but what's in the bottle usually has water added to it. Is the solution's ability to resist degradation increased or decreased with the addition of water? Or does it even make a difference?

If only I had been a bourbon drinker when I took chemistry class.

squire
02-05-2013, 11:36
Considering Bourbon is placed in bottle at 40% or above alcohol by volume (ABV) I don't think it makes a difference.

docbible
02-06-2013, 09:24
Keep in mind that those bottles that are "found" hiding in a distributers warehouse and offered for sale far after their release date, have been stored in a nontemperature controlled environment. tim

squire
02-06-2013, 09:47
I think we can all agree whisky is pretty durable stuff. A cork or less than tight metal closure is the weak link.

Barclay Beach
02-06-2013, 16:38
I think we can all agree whisky is pretty durable stuff. A cork or less than tight metal closure is the weak link.

Why they stick a potential contaminant (cork) in the bottle is beyond me. It's like using a lemon wedge as a milk lid. Maybe not that bad, but still...

p_elliott
02-07-2013, 08:54
Bourbon while aging goes from well below freezing to well over a 100 degrees. So I wouldn't worry too any much about normal household temp fluctuations. Just keep it out of direct sun light. In any house out of direct sun light that you are comfortable it will be too.

squire
02-07-2013, 09:10
I'm comfortable just knowing a supply of whisky is in the house.

Brisko
02-07-2013, 09:45
I think we can all agree whisky is pretty durable stuff. A cork or less than tight metal closure is the weak link.

I don't know, all of my bottles seem to leak prodigiously once opened, regardless of closure.:drinking:

p_elliott
02-07-2013, 09:53
I don't know, all of my bottles seem to leak prodigiously once opened, regardless of closure.:drinking:


Forgot the other needed requirment they have to remain upright :slappin:

squire
02-07-2013, 10:06
Brisko I call that accelerated evaporation due to high alcohol content . . . some wives actually buy that line.