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GreggJ
03-01-2013, 09:15
I recently got my mini 2L barrel and have been enjoying barrel aged manhattans.

The juice has been in the barrel about 15 days and is absolutely delicious. As I drink, I have been refilling and tweaking it to taste. The original mix used a 4-1-3 dashes (Jeffersons Rye, Noilly Pratt Rouge, Peychards). As it ages I have put in a touch of Solerno Blood Orange (very small amount), Kicked it up with small amounts of OWA 107 and a little Woodford reserve to round it out a little. I have been doing this along with replenishing the Jeffersons, NP and Peychards as space allows. I gotta say IMHO the barrel aging and the slight modifications have really brought out something special.

I am thinking I will leave it in the barrel another week or two and then bottle in glass and move on to another recipe. I am thinking Negroni's or Aged Margarita's (Tequila and Grand Marnier only). Haven't decided yet. I have to say I am really liking the mini barrel and experimenting with these aged cocktails.

Anyone else playing around with a Mini Barrels? If so any reco's on recipes?

Trey Manthey
03-01-2013, 09:32
I found the barrel pretty useless for aging bourbon, so I keep a batch of Negronis going in my 2L barrel. I use equal parts Martin Miller's Westbourne gin, Carpano Antica, and either Campari or Gran Classico amaro (I alternate between them so I get a mixture). Once this batch runs out I might switch to Boulevardiers or Cocktail a la Louisiane.

wadewood
03-01-2013, 09:46
I also had pretty poor results with my 5l barrel an aging bourbon. So, I'm aging soy sauce; filled it last April.

GreggJ
03-01-2013, 09:58
I heard that about aging bourbon so I did not even bother with the White Dog and went straight to the Manhattans and think it will only be used for aging cocktails.

I went to a high end restaurant a few weeks back and had a 30day Barrel aged Manhattan, They made it with Whistle Pig Rye, Carpano Antica and an unidentified bitters. This stuff was amazing and prompted my Barrel purchase shortly after. To this point I have really enjoyed the results from my own Manhattan concoction. I am thinking Negroni's will be next.

rndenks
03-01-2013, 12:04
My dad bought me a 3L barrel probably 7 years ago while on a business trip to Mexico. He had tried some aged tequila out of a similar barrel, and liked it so much he thought I would enjoy aging my own tequila. I never actually got around to aging any in mine, but he aged some very good straight tequila in his. I stumbled upon the thread about this here on SB, and it dawned on me that I could unpack my barrel and get aging.

Last weekend I bottled my first batch of Manhattans. I used a ratio of 2:1:1 dash, of Makers Mark, Martini Rossi, Angostura Bitters. They were in the barrel for 12 days, and I bottled it because it was getting a strong “oak” flavor. It seems much smoother than a freshly made Manhattan. However, I did buy some more MM to taste the aged version head-to-head with the a freshly made cocktail, but came down with a bad cold before I could do the comparison. Maybe this weekend.

I plan on continuing my aging and trying different bourbons, ryes, bitters and ratios. I picked up some 375 ml bottles and tasting corks from a local home brew store to bottle the cocktails. I chose the smaller bottles because they were small enough that I could take one or two with me to a party, give one to my dad, etc. Also I plan to save one or two from each batch so down the road I can do a big tasting to compare all the batches. What a glorious day that will be!!!

Next batch will likely be FR Yellow Label or Rittenhouse (if I can find any). I would like to also try some blood orange bitters.

Happy Aging!

squire
03-01-2013, 12:33
Would appreciate some tasting notes as you journey along.

rndenks
03-01-2013, 12:52
Would appreciate some tasting notes as you journey along.

Since you asked Squire...I will do a tasting comparing my aged Manhattans to a freshly made one this weekend. Maybe even post some pictures.

Bourbon Boiler
03-01-2013, 17:57
4:2:2:1

Home-aged bourbon: store-bought apple brandy: vermouth: bitters made a great manhattan. (I recomend heavy bitters for those trying this.)

Ejmharris
03-01-2013, 19:39
I got a barrel kit from TPS about 18 months ago. I aged a rye white dig and it sucked. Aged a MBR black dog and it sucked. I then aged a manhattan and it was awesome. Used 3-1-6 dashes of bitters. It was fantastic!!!! Bourbon was 1849.


Mike

MarkRuck
03-03-2013, 06:01
I got a 3L barrel a couple of months ago. I had read the dismal results of trying to age white dog in these small barrels, so I went straight to Manhattans. I used 2:1 Larceny and Martini sweet vermouth, but I over bittered my first batch. Second batch, again 2:1 Larceny:Martini easy on the bitters, and it was much better. The aging process made the cocktail was much smoother, but all of the flavors seemed to have had the edges rounded off.

I can report that I prefer a fresh Manhattan to an aged version so far. I like the 'bite' of the fresh cocktail. I get much more of the whiskey flavor from the fresh version.

I will continue to experiment however. Next I am going to start with a little higher proof whiskey - perhaps an OWA 107 to see if I can't keep some of the 'bite' that I enjoy.

squire
03-03-2013, 06:20
Now I can see a reason for those barrels, 'Honey, I've got to drink them up or they'll go off'.

compliance
03-03-2013, 09:49
Do you think the barrel is interacting with the Manhattan at all or is it the equivalent of aging in a mason jar (albeit more fun)? This will be my next experiment after the rock and rye is done, but I might just skip buying the barrel.

rndenks
03-03-2013, 16:41
I think it interacts with the barrel. I could taste a very distinct oak taste that I have never tasted in Makers Mark. It also smooths out the drink.

I was unable to complete my tasting comparing my aged manhattans vs. fresh made ones. Still can't kick this cold and I want to give a fair review. I will try one evening this week.

Bourbon Boiler
03-03-2013, 18:56
Do you think the barrel is interacting with the Manhattan at all or is it the equivalent of aging in a mason jar (albeit more fun)? This will be my next experiment after the rock and rye is done, but I might just skip buying the barrel.

I have nothing specific to document this, but I sense the oak does wonders for the vermouth.

z327
03-05-2013, 20:27
I have two 1L barrels. First one filled with BT White after infusing with a Madagascar vanilla bean for a week. Then barreled for six months. In and out of the house to get some serious Texas heat. Came out of the barrel at 150 proof and the angels took 35%. Mellowed it down to 120 proof. It's a has a great deep dark color. Flavor wise not too complex, strong woodsy taste is balanced well with a strong vanilla and caramel note. Happy with my first attempt.
2nd barrel got a rye white dog infused with cinnamon and nutmeg for a week before entering the barrel. Only four months when I decided to bottle it. Again over 150 proof but only 20% loss. Proofed downed to 110. Nice color, very spicy, real bold mouthful of flavors and creamy too. Again pleased with the result. But I am a novice. I know I like both better than most bottom shelf whiskey's.

Tony
03-06-2013, 05:14
Great stuff in here. Any thoughts on good places to get barrels? Is there a book or website that talks about the ways to do this? recipes? time in barrel and such?

Best regards, Tony

squire
03-06-2013, 05:48
I doubt I'll ever try such an experiment but I understand the appeal.

sailor22
03-06-2013, 06:12
How do the Manhattans you guys are aging compare to the High West barrel aged Manhattan? Anyone do a side by side taste comparo? I would expect the capability to tweak to you own personal taste preference would be a huge plus for dong it at home.

rndenks
04-01-2013, 09:13
I finally had time to sit down this weekend for a head-to-head tasting of my barrel aged Manhattans up against a freshly made Manhattan of the same recipe. The best part was that I did this with my Dad just prior to enjoying a fine cigar and enjoying some short lived but much needed spring weather in Ohio. That is what Easter is all about right…well partially I guess.

The recipe I used was 2:1:1 dash using Makers Mark, Martin Rossi Sweet Vermouth and Angostura bitters. The aged batch was done in my 3L charred oak barrel for 12 days, and then bottled in several 375 ml glass bottles. Here is what I found.

Nose: The aged Manhattan had a definite distinct oak note with nearly no alcohol undertone compared to the fresh. The fresh cocktail did have sort of “crisp” smell, but you could pick a part the different pieces.
Taste: On the aged version the oak hits hard up front…really noticeable, not unpleasant, but quickly trails off into a super smooth and blended taste. The fresh again was “crisp” almost refreshing taste. It was completely obvious as to which was which.
Finish: You could easily pull apart the pieces (bourbon, vermouth and bitters) in the fresh Manhattan. The aged cocktail was tougher to do that because it almost seemed to be “one” component. Also the aged Manhattan had a very slight oaky finish. It did have an almost “dry” taste, but not to the point that is was unpleasant. I do not know if that is the tannins from the oak, but it was definitely unique to the aged version.

My verdict: They were both good, and I think they both have their place. The comparison that keeps coming to mind is “sweet vs. savory”, but it is more crisp vs. smooth. The aged Manhattan is so smooth and complex that it reminds of the enjoyment of a good steak right off the grill. It is complex enough to enjoy on its own, and really savor the complexity. While the fresh Manhattan had that crispness that would be very refreshing on warm summer day, or could serve a complimentary roll at a meal.

I plan to continue to experiment with barrel aging Manhattans by playing with the recipe, age, etc. I thinking for my next batch to try FR Yellow and maybe blood orange bitters. I would like to hold back one bottle per batch for comparing the recipes down the road.

There you are. I would love to hear if anyone else has completed similar tastings.

Beer&Bourbon
04-01-2013, 12:44
A number of bars downtown have been aging cocktails - mostly manhattans. I've really enjoyed how integrated the flavors are. It looks like some of you really pick up on the additional oak character, but I do wonder what differences would be noted between a mason jar aged manhattan vs. barrel-aged manhattan. I don't have a barrel so I encourage someone out there to try this and report back. If I get a small barrel, I'll post here with findings.

rndenks
04-01-2013, 13:01
A number of bars downtown have been aging cocktails - mostly manhattans. I've really enjoyed how integrated the flavors are. It looks like some of you really pick up on the additional oak character, but I do wonder what differences would be noted between a mason jar aged manhattan vs. barrel-aged manhattan. I don't have a barrel so I encourage someone out there to try this and report back. If I get a small barrel, I'll post here with findings.

In the name of science B&B, I will allocate a small portion of my next batch to jar. I will age that as long as I do the stuff in the barrel. I will happily report back with my findings whenever get around to my next batch.

Unless we hear back from others first regarding aging in a jar.

Beer&Bourbon
04-02-2013, 15:25
Awesome. I'm looking forward to how this turns out. I'll use these results to determine if I should invest in a barrel or just age in a mason jar. I realize that I already have mason jars so I'm going to start a batch this weekend aged for different lengths of time to determine if that itself makes any difference. I'll report back when this experiment is complete. Cheers!

Roger

jsbull
04-12-2013, 09:26
Great stuff in here. Any thoughts on good places to get barrels? Is there a book or website that talks about the ways to do this? recipes? time in barrel and such?

Best regards, Tony

I have only aged some home made corn based lightning, but I used a 2L barrel from http://oakbarrelsltd.com. It is very well made, their service is good and their instructions are easy to follow (including suggested aging times). I did make the mistake of taking the whisky out, waiting a couple of weeks and deciding to put it back in. I didn't re-swell the barrel and lost about 300ml through the barrel before I could get the rest back in the bottle. I filled it with water to swell it again, emptied that out and put the whisky back in there. It worked great again. I have noticed that they are only useful for a couple of runs. They lose that strong oak influence with each batch, as you would probably expect.

bigtoys
08-15-2013, 14:27
Gonna order a barrel, too, but thought I'd start small. Ordered a couple of bottles and inserts. Unfortunately, I'm working 2 weeks from now and also busy the next, so I'm not gonna be able to experiment just yet. Maybe I'll start something the week I'm working for 2 weeks later.
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/8a452d3d-67cd-4805-9104-df0e831222ba_zps68d081d7.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/8a452d3d-67cd-4805-9104-df0e831222ba_zps68d081d7.jpg.html)

Ejmharris
08-15-2013, 20:47
Gonna order a barrel, too, but thought I'd start small. Ordered a couple of bottles and inserts. Unfortunately, I'm working 2 weeks from now and also busy the next, so I'm not gonna be able to experiment just yet. Maybe I'll start something the week I'm working for 2 weeks later.
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/8a452d3d-67cd-4805-9104-df0e831222ba_zps68d081d7.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/8a452d3d-67cd-4805-9104-df0e831222ba_zps68d081d7.jpg.html)

I bought the Wasmunds kit to age a rye a couple of years ago. That experiment never amounted to anything because BT said, small barrels makes lousy whiskey. Anyway, I did use it last year to age a Manhattan. It was fantastic. I have a Barton BIB manhattan concoction in it right now. Tasted it last night after two weeks and it isn't quite ready yet. Will probably give it another couple of weeks and try it again. I may move it outside to the garage to allow it to cycle a little more but I don't want a ton of evaporation.


Mike

Fodowsky
09-08-2013, 17:14
I'd like to resurrect this because I have a few more questions I would love to get the guidance of those here who have experience.

Is it essential to fill the barrel to remove as much air as possible? If not, is there a minimum? 1/2 Full? 3/4? 1/4?

Once you get the aged cocktail to the "sweet spot" should it be bottled?

Since Vermouth is involved, should the juice be refrigerated after the time in the barrel?

Can sugars be added during the time in the barrel? I love my Maple Manhattan recipe and would like to try to age it.

Are there advantages to altering the temperature during barreling? Time spent inside (cooler) vs outside (much warmer here in Dallas)

I've ordered both a 1 and 2 liter barrels. Can't wait to get started on this. I have the High West 36th Vote and while it is pretty good, I think I can do much better! Would also love to hear other recipes you have tried.

Thanks in advance for your help!!

Trey Manthey
09-08-2013, 17:37
The higher alcohol content prevents the vermouth from spoiling. I barrel age negroni, manhattan, and boulevardier. Once the fill level gets below 1/3 or it has been in for more than a month I'll usually dump into a bottle or decanter.

Josh
09-08-2013, 18:10
I have a 5 liter barrel in the attic of my garage (it's a big garage) I own in conjunction with Bonneamie in which we've been aging whiskeys and cocktails. The first cocktail (put into the barrel after it was used to age some peated malt spirit from Grand Traverse Distillery) was a manhattan. I don't remember what brands I used that time, but I used a 1:1:1 ratio of bourbon, rye, and sweet vermouth.After that I filled it with more manhattan mix. It was the same proportions, but I remember the brand this time: 1 Bulleit Rye, 1 Rittenhouse, 1 Old Granddad BiB, 1 Bulleit Bourbon, 2 Dolin vermouth. When it was where we wanted it, I decanted it into bottles. It turned out very well, as any of the people who tasted it at the get together at my house can testify. I didn't put any bitters into the barrel because I didn't want to do the math it get the right ratio and figured they could just be added to taste before drinking.

After that we refilled the barrel with the peated malt whiskey since neither of us was very happy about how it turned out. It was in there for most of the summer. It turned out pretty weird, but pretty tasty. It has a real nutty nose and taste and a fruity finish so I nicknamed it PB&J whiskey. The first company to come up with a manhattan-finished peated malt whiskey is getting sued by me.

Anyway, after the peated malt rebarreling, we decided to do a boulevardier. We used 1:1:1 ration again. 2 bottles Campari, 2 bottles Old Ezra 101, 2 bottles Noilly Pratt red vermouth (I went cheap because the Campari is so damn expensive). We are looking forward to the results!

Josh
09-08-2013, 18:22
I'd like to resurrect this because I have a few more questions I would love to get the guidance of those here who have experience.

Is it essential to fill the barrel to remove as much air as possible? If not, is there a minimum? 1/2 Full? 3/4? 1/4?

As full as possible would be my recommendation.


Once you get the aged cocktail to the "sweet spot" should it be bottled?

Yes. It's easy to just save the bottles that the stuff you put into the barrel came in.


Since Vermouth is involved, should the juice be refrigerated after the time in the barrel?

No, because of what Trey said.


Can sugars be added during the time in the barrel? I love my Maple Manhattan recipe and would like to try to age it.

Never tried that so I can't comment on it. Try it yourself and report back!


Are there advantages to altering the temperature during barreling? Time spent inside (cooler) vs outside (much warmer here in Dallas)

Temperature variation is your friend. It helps the liquid inside move in and out of the layers of the wood. I have noticed a significant variation in how my garage barrel does in summer vs. winter. Ages much faster in the summer.


I've ordered both 1 and 2 liter barrels. Can't wait to get started on this. I have the High West 36th Vote and while it is pretty good, I think I can do much better! Would also love to hear other recipes you have tried.

Thanks in advance for your help!!

See my post above. Good luck! I would also say that it took several fills before my barrel really started hitting its stride.

EagleRiver
09-10-2013, 20:59
If beer counts then yes I barrel age at home.

Here is one of my brewing partners filling a buffalo trace barrel with our Home brew Imperial Stout.
16551

We aged it for a year in the barrel, Then we divided it into 10 5 gallon kegs and aged parts of it with other items after the barrel ageing. My favorite was the fresh toasted coconut, Tahitian vanilla bean and intelligentsia Espresso bean combo, it was pretty Epic.

Right now we have a 13% English Barleywine that has been in a Weller Special Reserve Barrel since April, we will probably keg and bottle it around Christmas, though it already tastes spectacular.

MyOldKyDram
09-10-2013, 21:18
That dude has three arms! :O

Renegator
09-11-2013, 13:24
The only cocktail I have barrel aged is Manhattans. I find (like so many others) it really rounds out the drink - takes the edges off.

I also barrel aged some Captain Morgan for 30 days. It really changed the flavor and I could really taste the oak. It was interesting and not something I did a second time... if you catch my drift.

Fodowsky
09-17-2013, 19:49
So I'm getting ready to barrel my first batch. The barrel has been full of water for the past few days and is good to go. I've picked the vermouth - Carpano Antica. I'm thinking about blending HWRR with a little Handy - any thoughts on this? Angostura, Fee Brother Whisky Aged and Fee Brothers Cherry bitters. Looking forward to the results!

HighInTheMtns
09-17-2013, 23:36
So I'm getting ready to barrel my first batch. The barrel has been full of water for the past few days and is good to go. I've picked the vermouth - Carpano Antica. I'm thinking about blending HWRR with a little Handy - any thoughts on this? Angostura, Fee Brother Whisky Aged and Fee Brothers Cherry bitters. Looking forward to the results!
HWRR and THH in a brand new small barrel sounds like a way to ruin expensive whiskey. Start with something more modest and condition the barrel before you go high end.

Yeti
09-18-2013, 06:54
If beer counts then yes I barrel age at home.

Here is one of my brewing partners filling a buffalo trace barrel with our Home brew Imperial Stout.
16551

We aged it for a year in the barrel, Then we divided it into 10 5 gallon kegs and aged parts of it with other items after the barrel ageing. My favorite was the fresh toasted coconut, Tahitian vanilla bean and intelligentsia Espresso bean combo, it was pretty Epic.

Right now we have a 13% English Barleywine that has been in a Weller Special Reserve Barrel since April, we will probably keg and bottle it around Christmas, though it already tastes spectacular.

Good God, man! That all sounds delicious. Good work!

Fodowsky
09-22-2013, 06:51
I barreled a 2 liter Manhattan recipe and a 1 liter Negroni recipe yesterday. Now the waiting begins. I used my personal favorite recipes. I figure I can tweak them along the way or when I prepare a drink.

Manhattan
30 oz High West Rendezvous Rye
8 oz Thomas Handy Rye
13 oz Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth
2 oz Angostura Bitters
.5 oz Fee Brothers Whiskey Aged Bitters
.5 oz Fee Brothers Cherry Bitters

Negroni
10 oz Hendricks Gin
10 oz Carpano Antica
10 oz Campari

bigtoys
10-10-2013, 15:08
started today. just using a small bottle with a piece of charred wood from Tuthilltown
3 parts 4R yellow label, 1 part Noilly Prat sweet vermouth, 1 part Cherry Marnier, dashes Regan's orange bitters
(this is Gibson's Steakhouse Rush St. Manhattan, subbing 4R for WR)

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/etoh/8030834e-527c-47fb-bbd0-4d00cf478d4a_zpsbc6f8137.jpg (http://s230.photobucket.com/user/bigtoys335/media/etoh/8030834e-527c-47fb-bbd0-4d00cf478d4a_zpsbc6f8137.jpg.html)

smokinjoe
10-14-2013, 18:33
For some reason, I just couldn't resist doing this...:crazy: Just had a ball filling my 1L barrel with a Vieux Carre...I am with no doubt, easily entertained...Now, I wait.
BTW, the main 3 were: Ri1, Ferrand Ambre, and Vya.

Fodowsky
10-31-2013, 19:54
I am officially a fan. I bottled my recipes and they are simply delicious. Lots of oak mixed with a Manhattan flavor that is very balanced and integrated. Unlike anything I've ever had. Love it.

Fodowsky
11-03-2013, 18:32
Just barreled another recipe. Willet Rye, Punt e Mes and Angostura. Now I wait... with a Manhattan from Batch #1!

rndenks
11-04-2013, 12:39
Reading this post is giving me the itch to barrel another batch. That and I am down to my last bottle of my previous batch. I am interested in how Bigtoys batch tasted with FRYL? That was my going to be my next selection. Maybe give me something to do this weekend, so I might have them ready for Thanksgiving!!!

ewj
11-13-2013, 10:15
currently got three batches going. teqroni, brazilivardier and manhattan sitting in the barrel as we speak. will post a pic asap

rndenks
12-03-2013, 06:50
Getting ready to mix up another batch of Manhattans for my barrel, and I need some help making my mind up on ingredients. My last batch was made with MM. I am sharing this batch with some neighbors, so I think I want to stay away from rye.

I am deciding between FRYL, Larceny, KC and ER10. Anyone want to help me pick?

ewj
12-03-2013, 07:19
i'd give 4ryw a try bc it's by far the cheapest and low-ish proof too which is a plus in barrel ageing

tanstaafl2
12-03-2013, 13:58
Getting ready to mix up another batch of Manhattans for my barrel, and I need some help making my mind up on ingredients. My last batch was made with MM. I am sharing this batch with some neighbors, so I think I want to stay away from rye.

I am deciding between FRYL, Larceny, KC and ER10. Anyone want to help me pick?

A barrel aged Manhattan will likely soften the rye component of the drink and might be a good way to introduce others to the joy of rye. Use a barely legal rye like the old standby, Ritt BIB, and see how it works. If you don't want 100 proof then there is always the "crown jewel" of WT, the 81 proof rye. Although personally I think I would want more proof for a barrel aged cocktail, not less.

Of the others the Four Roses is likely the highest in rye content with probably something around 25-30% depending on the blend that day so that would be my (reluctant) second choice. :cool:

sutton
12-03-2013, 14:27
If your last one was based on MM I'd say try ER10 which is low-rye, but not sure how much barrel influence is picked up in the additional barrel aging that might make the cocktail too woody? While FRYL isn't low rye, it is low proof and likely not as old. I'd pick that, it would at least be a nice contrast in style to the MM blend you just did and the low proof would keep the rye influence from being very dominant - might provide a gentle enough transition from the MM version if that was a hit.

squire
12-03-2013, 14:32
Of course a low rye mash bill such as Old Charter might work. For mixing purposes I think Benchmark holds up right well and is not so rye froward as say Bulliet or Barton.

rndenks
12-04-2013, 11:58
Thanks for the input.

I decided to go with the FRYL for a couple of reasons. First, I plan to save one bottle from each batch so I can do a side by side comparison down the road. The FRYL is close in proof to the MM, but I believe it is more of rye heavy bourbon than wheater (?). I think my next batch will be a full blown rye, and then I would like to do a high proof batch. It think that would give an interesting range of recipes.

Anyways, I am hoping to barrel next week, and I will post my thoughts when it is done.

rndenks
01-10-2014, 12:38
Well I tasted my latest batch last night again, and I think I will be bottling it tonight. I went with the FRYL, and at a mix of 2:2:1. I tasted it twice over the two weeks, and my initial reaction both times is the FRYL seems too light (proof wise). I doubt I would go below 90 proof ever again.

Last night I tasted side by side with a pour from an non-barreled sample of the same recipe. There is no doubt that the barrel aged is mellower, well mingled and more oaky. By this I mean you taste the drink as one thing rather than tasting the sweetness of vermouth, the herbs of bitters, and the bourbon all separately in stages of the tasting. And the finish is very wooded and a bit dry, and that wood lingers too.

So excited to spend more time with a real pour of this over the weekend. I will report more tasting notes. Next batch will be a full blown rye!!!

Oboe Cadobro
01-10-2014, 13:06
Interesting article and taste test about economical barrel aging cocktails at home without barrels.

http://manmadediy.com/users/chris/posts/2697-how-to-make-diy-barrel-aged-cocktails-at-home-no-barrel-required

mhatzung
01-19-2014, 21:03
Thanks to this thread I ordered a one liter barrel to age Manhattans in. 8 days ago I mixed 750 ml of WT101 with 6 ounces of Noilly Prat Sweet(4:1) and 1 ounce of Angostura Bitters. I tasted it tonight and was surprised at how 'put together' it was. Very smooth with some added smoke and oak in the finish. It was like I had used a much more expensive bourbon to make the Manhattan. I think I will let it go till it has aged 2 weeks and then bottle it. I'm very happy with the the results so far. I would just like to increase the smoke and oak in the finish. I'm really liking what's there.

Any suggestions for my next aging trial? I'm open to any suggestions, whether you've tried it or just think it would work. How long do you think I should expect to age the next batch? 2 weeks like this one or three because the barrel is not new?

higgins
01-20-2014, 11:27
I just finished my first batch of "barrel aged" Manhattans with one of those Tuthilltown bottle inserts. I used RRSmBSB, which I didn't find particularly complex or interesting on it's own. The Manhattan was fantastic, though. As mentioned previously in this thread, the cocktail becomes very unified and integrated in flavor. Mine had a great, long-lasting dry finish that I would never be able to get without barrel aging.


Any suggestions for my next aging trial? I'm open to any suggestions, whether you've tried it or just think it would work.

I'm going to try some Willett 4-year SB Rye for my next batch. I have a feeling that high-rye, high-proof will work quite well with barrel aging.

smokinjoe
04-10-2014, 15:48
For some reason, I just couldn't resist doing this...:crazy: Just had a ball filling my 1L barrel with a Vieux Carre...I am with no doubt, easily entertained...Now, I wait.
BTW, the main 3 were: Ri1, Ferrand Ambre, and Vya.


Let the record show here, that I answered the question very helpfully...;)


And, if you're asking if I'm trying to be a Dick...The answer is...YES!!!!!!! :lol:

HighInTheMtns
04-11-2014, 00:40
Let the record show here, that I answered the question very helpfully...;)


And, if you're asking if I'm trying to be a Dick...The answer is...YES!!!!!!! :lol:
Joe, you crack me up. :toast:

Fodowsky
04-13-2014, 10:22
I just bottled a batch of Manhattans made with Knob Creek Maple Rye. Really nice!

Young Blacksmith
04-13-2014, 14:49
I have a three liter barrel filled with a mix of baby sazerac, rittenhouse, and half a bottle of WTR101, and a bottle of Dolin sweet vermouth. I skipped the bitters in the barrel as I like the way they taste too much. Boy is it easy to make a Manhattan now!

Fill a glass with a couple of cubes, grab the jar of Luxardo cherries, spoon up two with some juice, drop it in the glass, shake 5-6 times with Pechyaud's, and count to 5 while filling from the barrel. Stir and enjoy!