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View Full Version : Texas has some weird alcohol laws; how about your state?



wadewood
03-12-2013, 18:47
I was following some proposed changes in this years legislation in our state concerning distillers and making the state more craft beer friendly. Texas laws can be found here - http://www.tabc.state.tx.us/laws/code_and_rules.asp

In doing so, I read through our existing laws and and found a few things of interest:

-unless you are in a downtown "central business district" that has passed rules preventing it or on public school ground, openly consuming alcohol in public in allowed. Only these business districts areas that have clear boundaries can prohibit drinking in public. We have a very popular river tubing area that the local city council tried to ban alcohol on the river. They were stopped by the state. They then changed the law to ban disposable containers; so now you can float with a keg but not a can.

-Texas is a three tier state. As with other 3 tiers systems, the manufacturer, wholesaler, and retailer are prohibited from any overlapping ownership - with one exception - that if the business existed and were permitted prior to 8/24/1935. In Texas, Glazer's, a wholesaler, has been in business prior to this and I think this exception was written for them.

-No package store (retailer) may be owned by a corporation, unless that store was owned by such prior to 4/28/1995.

-Also, no individual may own more than 5 stores unless they held these prior to 5/01/1949.

-a bar/restaurant may not substitute one brand of alcoholic beverage requested by the customer for another without prior authorization.

-rebates and/or coupons offered by manufacturers are prohibited

-as of 9/2011, personal importation of spirits and beer collection for those moving into the state is allowed. Wine was already allowed.

Clavius
03-12-2013, 18:59
I wouldn't even know where to begin with Kentucky's laws...

MyOldKyDram
03-12-2013, 19:03
Neither would Kentucky.

At least they have been moving towards making some positive changes recently.

michaelturtle1
03-12-2013, 19:04
PA's are pretty simple., If you want a good bottle, travel to another state or order it online from the only vendor allowed to ship to the state (which is the state itself)

LostBottle
03-12-2013, 19:07
WTF are laws?

padpadpad

SFS
03-12-2013, 20:05
The weirdest one I was aware of in Texas is that parents or legal guardians could bring underage children into bars and they were allowed to drink, if the parents gave permission.

I thought my leg was being pulled on this, but I talked to an attorney who said it was no joke.

smknjoe
03-12-2013, 20:18
(In Texas) What about driving with an open container being legal until sometime in the 90's (as long as you weren't "intoxicated") The the legal limit was higher back then too.


In the dry county I lived in (Alabama) you could not have more than 2 750ml or 1 1.75l bottles of spirits or 2 cases of beer at a time in your vehicle or it was considered bootlegging. The alcohol had to be kept in your trunk or behind the seat in a truck or you could be arrested.

BigBoldBully
03-12-2013, 20:21
Wisconsin is also a 3-tier state. I would say the weirdest thing is that age statements are apparently being outlawed here, one by one.

BigBoldBully
03-12-2013, 20:26
[QUOTE=smknjoe;328995](In Texas) What about driving with an open container being legal until sometime in the 90's (as long as you weren't "intoxicated")

In Nashville (at least in the late 90's), it was legal to have an open container wherever, including while driving. Not weird, assuming responsible citizens who resent paternalistic governments, and not the whole state, but unusual.

ATXWhiskey
03-12-2013, 20:52
I was following some proposed changes in this years legislation in our state concerning distillers and making the state more craft beer friendly. Texas laws can be found here - http://www.tabc.state.tx.us/laws/code_and_rules.asp

In doing so, I read through our existing laws and and found a few things of interest:

-unless you are in a downtown "central business district" that has passed rules preventing it or on public school ground, openly consuming alcohol in public in allowed. Only these business districts areas that have clear boundaries can prohibit drinking in public. We have a very popular river tubing area that the local city council tried to ban alcohol on the river. They were stopped by the state. They then changed the law to ban disposable containers; so now you can float with a keg but not a can.

-Texas is a three tier state. As with other 3 tiers systems, the manufacturer, wholesaler, and retailer are prohibited from any overlapping ownership - with one exception - that if the business existed and were permitted prior to 8/24/1935. In Texas, Glazer's, a wholesaler, has been in business prior to this and I think this exception was written for them.

-No package store (retailer) may be owned by a corporation, unless that store was owned by such prior to 4/28/1995.

-Also, no individual may own more than 5 stores unless they held these prior to 5/01/1949.

-a bar/restaurant may not substitute one brand of alcoholic beverage requested by the customer for another without prior authorization.

-rebates and/or coupons offered by manufacturers are prohibited

-as of 9/2011, personal importation of spirits and beer collection for those moving into the state is allowed. Wine was already allowed.

I work in the Texas Legislature. If you have any ideas for politically feasible options to fix some of these problems, let me know. I would be happy to push them. The bill filing deadline had passed this session, though.

wadewood
03-13-2013, 06:21
(In Texas) What about driving with an open container being legal until sometime in the 90's (as long as you weren't "intoxicated")

Nothing strange about that law IMHO. Let's see, you can have a couple of drinks and immediately get in car and drive and it's legal. But drink your 1st beer on drive home and you are breaking the law? Just proves MADD does not understand how alcohol effects your system.

At least Missouri did not cave to MADD; still legal to have an open container in car. Also in Missouri there are no laws against public intoxication and it's legal to distill 100 gallons of any liquor for personal use (although federal permit is still required for distilled spirits - kinda like the states that have legalized pot, you are still breaking federal law). Why don't we all move to Missouri?

Enoch
03-13-2013, 06:37
Nothing strange about that law IMHO. Let's see, you can have a couple of drinks and immediately get in car and drive and it's legal. But drink your 1st beer on drive home and you are breaking the law? Just proves MADD does not understand how alcohol effects your system.

At least Missouri did not cave to MADD; still legal to have an open container in car. Also in Missouri there are no laws against public intoxication and it's legal to distill 100 gallons of any liquor for personal use (although federal permit is still required for distilled spirits - kinda like the states that have legalized pot, you are still breaking federal law). Why don't we all move to Missouri?

But then Missouri has some of the strictest marijuana laws in the nation. I know because I just spent a small fortune clearing the name of someone. Columbia passed a law requiring all minor possession charges be tried in municipal court so that Mizzou students don't loose financial aid, so the sheriff(?) sets up check points right outside the city lines so he can get it in state courts and higher fines and NO way to expunge. But Missouri does have some good micro-distilleries.

But then in SC you can basically sell alcohol above 15% or below 20% but not both. For some reason we cannot sell beer and liquor in the same store. And it wasn't too long ago that we still had mini-bottles only in restaurants and bars but mini-bottles could not be sold in stores. And we finally allowed beer above 5.5%. Firefly first distilled out of state until the laws were changed that allowed distilling.

Borchard
03-13-2013, 07:33
I used to think Oklahoma's laws were the worst, until i started travelling for a living and realized that several states have, what I consider to be, jacked-up liquor laws.
In Oklahoma:
-Liquors stored have to close by 9pm, and they are not open on Sundays or election days.
-Liquor stores can NOT sell ANYTHING that doesn't have alcohol in it; like bottle openers, wine glasses, stoppers, etc... The law, from what I've been told by store owners, says that liquor stores can only sell "intoxicating beverages". And, according to Oklahoma law, 3.2 beer is NOT considered an intoxicating beverage. That's why OK liquor stores do not sell Bud, Coors, etc...
-Liquor stores can NOT have refrigeration units. No cold beer.
-No wine or high-gravity beer can be sold in grocery stores.
-Oklahoma is also a 3-tier setup. One of the funny quirks about that is Choc Beer in Krebs, OK is owned by the same people that own Pete's Place, an Italian restaurant next door. They cannot sell beer to themselves. Choc has to sell it to a Wholesaler, who sells it to a distributer, who then sells it to Pete's Place...
-From what I can gather, Brew Pubs in Oklahoma can ONLY make 3.2 beer for sale in their own establishments. This is why BJ's Brewhouse has their beer, in Oklahoma, made by St. Arnold's in Houston, so they can have higher-gravity beers and get around the rule.

But to me, the weirdest rule I've came across was in upstate NY. I went into a liquor store by my hotel to get some beer, only to be told that they aren't allowed to sell beer in a lquor store?!? I had to go to a BEER Store, where the gentlemen filled up a half gallon growler, screwed a lid on it, and handed it to me. Now in OK, that would be Open Container?

Enoch
03-13-2013, 07:45
But to me, the weirdest rule I've came across was in upstate NY. I went into a liquor store by my hotel to get some beer, only to be told that they aren't allowed to sell beer in a lquor store?!? I had to go to a BEER Store, where the gentlemen filled up a half gallon growler, screwed a lid on it, and handed it to me. Now in OK, that would be Open Container?

In SC, they have to wrap electricians tape all over the top of the growler so that it won't be an "open container".

higgins
03-13-2013, 08:07
For some reason we cannot sell beer and liquor in the same store.

I always get a kick out of shopping at Green's in Columbia because of the way they've worked around this law. They apparently are able to sell both beer and liquor in the same 'store' by putting up a floor to ceiling chain link wall. You have to check out and exit on one side before you enter the other, but for all intents and purposes you are shopping at one store.

HighInTheMtns
03-13-2013, 08:13
In Utah:
-Grocery stores can sell no alcohol save for 4% ABV. Everything else is the domain of state liquor stores.

-50ml bottles of liquor are not allowed, nor are kegs of beer.

-Restaurant bartenders may not prepare drinks in the view of customers.

Wryguy
03-13-2013, 08:39
In Utah:
-Restaurant bartenders may not prepare drinks in the view of customers.

That is the dumbest one yet. So that we can be sure that they are watering down their #1 moneymaker, booze, or substituting substandard ingredients? This sounds like a stupid, corrupt, dumbass law. I'd love to hear arguments for this law, cause I can't think of a single one.

squire
03-13-2013, 09:12
Shadows of Prohibition and eternal damnation. I know people who believe they will go to Hell if they but step into a liquor store. These people vote.

Enoch
03-13-2013, 09:15
I always get a kick out of shopping at Green's in Columbia because of the way they've worked around this law. They apparently are able to sell both beer and liquor in the same 'store' by putting up a floor to ceiling chain link wall. You have to check out and exit on one side before you enter the other, but for all intents and purposes you are shopping at one store.

That is sort of the standard practice for getting around the law. One problem they faced is the limit of owning no more than three liquor stores in the state. When Green's opened the superstore on the interstate they already owned three liquor stores so they have another company (Frugal McDougal's) own the liquor store half but still call it Green's and they own and operate the beer/wine half.

Enoch
03-13-2013, 09:18
Shadows of Prohibition and eternal damnation. I know people who believe they will go to Hell if they but step into a liquor store. These people vote.

And a lot of them live in SC. My sister-in-law unfriended me on Facebook because I would post stuff about Bourbon and it disturbed her to read it.

wadewood
03-13-2013, 09:20
That is the dumbest one yet. So that we can be sure that they are watering down their #1 moneymaker, booze, or substituting substandard ingredients? This sounds like a stupid, corrupt, dumbass law. I'd love to hear arguments for this law, cause I can't think of a single one.

Utah drinks behind the curtain is because the LDS church and Mormons control the Utah State legislature and agenda. They don't drink and don't like others to. They don't want their members to even be tempted be seeing drinks poured.

HighInTheMtns
03-13-2013, 09:21
That is the dumbest one yet. So that we can be sure that they are watering down their #1 moneymaker, booze, or substituting substandard ingredients? This sounds like a stupid, corrupt, dumbass law. I'd love to hear arguments for this law, cause I can't think of a single one.
This law is not based on logical arguments but rather on the religious belief of the majority of Utahns.

squire
03-13-2013, 09:26
Get behind me Satan.

Wryguy
03-13-2013, 09:29
This law is not based on logical arguments but rather on the religious belief of the majority of Utahns.

Totally makes sense. Just goes to show how much religion enters into my thoughts. I don't really have a sense for the culture out there in Utah, just for the natural landscapes and amazing backpacking out there. :) I'll never forget the chuckle I had when I popped the top on my first Polygamy Porter and read the message on the bottle cap, reminding me, "Why have just one?" Excuse my ignorance in my last post, but as a bartender and drinker I'd really be annoyed by that law.

squire
03-13-2013, 09:31
Tell 'em you're a bartender and they'll pray for 'ya.

HighInTheMtns
03-13-2013, 09:31
Totally makes sense. Just goes to show how much religion enters into my thoughts. I don't really have a sense for the culture out there in Utah, just for the natural landscapes and amazing backpacking out there. :) I'll never forget the chuckle I had when I popped the top on my first Polygamy Porter and read the message on the bottle cap, reminding me, "Why have just one?" Excuse my ignorance in my last post, but as a bartender and drinker I'd really be annoyed by that law.
Bartenders and drinkers alike are really annoyed by that law. As it happens, an effort was just made to change it, but that effort failed: http://m.ksl.com/index/story/sid/24384035

doubleblank
03-13-2013, 12:52
The weirdest one I was aware of in Texas is that parents or legal guardians could bring underage children into bars and they were allowed to drink, if the parents gave permission.

I thought my leg was being pulled on this, but I talked to an attorney who said it was no joke.

Parents can order drinks for their underage children in Texas.......but it's up to the individual bar owners to decide whether to allow it or not. Many choose not to.

Here's another funny one here. Restaurants can't serve alcohol to you on Sunday untill 12 noon. Unless you also order food at the same time......then they can serve beginning at 11:30 am.

squire
03-13-2013, 12:55
Now I can see where the change to Daylight Savings Time can be useful.

SFS
03-14-2013, 07:11
Now I can see where the change to Daylight Savings Time can be useful.
Which brings up another memory. When I lived in NC, the bars closed one hour later during EDT, because the law about serving hours specified EST. That's been a long time ago, so it could have changed since I left.

p_elliott
03-14-2013, 08:04
Here's my favorite Iowa rule inmates on parole etc. can not go into establishments that sell alcohol. All hard liquor in Iowa has to be bought by liquor stores etc. from the state. Guess who works in the state liquor warehouse? Inmates.

Borchard
03-14-2013, 09:20
PA's are pretty simple., If you want a good bottle, travel to another state or order it online from the only vendor allowed to ship to the state (which is the state itself)
The only thing i remember about PA was when i was there about 6 years ago I couldn't find anywhere to buy some beer for my hotel room. I ended up going into a BAR and walking out with a six-pack. Apparently, bars in PA CAN sell TO-GO?

callmeox
03-14-2013, 09:23
Bars and beer distributors are your source for take home beer in PA.

Bars can sell 6 packs and distributors deal in case lots.

It is a very profitable law for bar owners.

Josh
03-14-2013, 09:30
Get behind me Satan.

What's the difference between a Baptist and a Methodist?

Methodists make eye contact when they see each other in the liquor store.

Smokewagon
03-14-2013, 11:02
I used to think Oklahoma's laws were the worst, until i started travelling for a living and realized that several states have, what I consider to be, jacked-up liquor laws.
In Oklahoma:
-Liquor stores can NOT sell ANYTHING that doesn't have alcohol in it; like bottle openers, wine glasses, stoppers, etc... The law, from what I've been told by store owners, says that liquor stores can only sell "intoxicating beverages". And, according to Oklahoma law, 3.2 beer is NOT considered an intoxicating beverage. That's why OK liquor stores do not sell Bud, Coors, etc...


This statement is not 100% accurate. Beers like Bud, Coors, etc are all over 3.2 in most states. These companies make beer at 3.2 ABV specifically for Oklahoma (and a few other states) so it can be sold in grocery and convenience stores. The reason you don't see the higher ABV versions from the big brewers actually has to do with the way wholesaling/distribution is set up for alcoholic beverages (Remember if it is under 3.2, it is non alcoholic and nto subject to the wholesale/distribution laws for alcoholic beverages).

Oklahoma has an open system system for wholesaling. Companies must sell to every wholesalers in the state for the same price. Anheuser-Busch, Miller, and Coors, require a franchise agreement be in place with all wholesalers/distributors. They aren't going to sell the strong (Over 3.2) stuff in Oklahoma until the current system is done away with and replaced with something like what most other states have: territory/franchise system.

~SW

HighInTheMtns
03-14-2013, 11:57
Note that "3.2" beer is a measurement of alcohol by weight. This is actually 4% ABV beer. Not a lot less than a typical Bud Light or whatever.

squire
03-14-2013, 12:03
Josh, Methodists speak to each other at the liquor store.

squire
03-14-2013, 12:06
Paul your story about inmates working in the liquor warehouse but being banned from a store when paroled makes perfect bureaucratic sense.

bigtoys
03-14-2013, 18:40
The weirdest one I was aware of in Texas is that parents or legal guardians could bring underage children into bars and they were allowed to drink, if the parents gave permission.

I thought my leg was being pulled on this, but I talked to an attorney who said it was no joke.

Wisconsin has this law, too.

I once had a stopover in Dallas coming home from Mexico with 5 bottles of tequila. Had to clear customs there. The customs officer said they want you to buy your alcohol in Texas and the limit was two bottles. I said I'm just passing through; I was willing to pay the duty; I probably could have just walked through and not been searched. I thought I was gonna lose some tequila that wasn't even available in the USA. Anyway, after the lecture, he let me through; no duty, all my tequila intact. Quite a relief.

Borchard
03-15-2013, 04:33
This statement is not 100% accurate. Beers like Bud, Coors, etc are all over 3.2 in most states. These companies make beer at 3.2 ABV specifically for Oklahoma (and a few other states) so it can be sold in grocery and convenience stores. The reason you don't see the higher ABV versions from the big brewers actually has to do with the way wholesaling/distribution is set up for alcoholic beverages (Remember if it is under 3.2, it is non alcoholic and nto subject to the wholesale/distribution laws for alcoholic beverages).

Oklahoma has an open system system for wholesaling. Companies must sell to every wholesalers in the state for the same price. Anheuser-Busch, Miller, and Coors, require a franchise agreement be in place with all wholesalers/distributors. They aren't going to sell the strong (Over 3.2) stuff in Oklahoma until the current system is done away with and replaced with something like what most other states have: territory/franchise system.

~SW
That helps to clarify it a little more.

Bigspur2011
03-15-2013, 05:17
In SC liquor stores have to close at 7pmand no Sunday sales. Also when they do tastings of different spirts in stores no store employee can be involved, it has to be some represenitive from the distributor.

HighInTheMtns
03-15-2013, 07:35
Utah drinks behind the curtain is because the LDS church and Mormons control the Utah State legislature and agenda. They don't drink and don't like others to. They don't want their members to even be tempted be seeing drinks poured.
More on this, taken from ksl.com:


Another hot topic - Utah's liquor laws. This session lawmakers created a "master liquor license" for restaurant chains. Now they don't need a separate license for each location.
To offset the change, fines for restaurants caught serving alcohol to minors will increase. A first offense fine is $1,500, a second offense is $3,000 and a third offense is $10,000.
Utah is known to run aggressive sting operations, sending minors who are employed by the state into bars where they are far more persistent than a kid with a fake ID who is scared of getting busted. Bars have been forced out of business over these fines without serving alcohol to a minor, just by being tricked by a state employee.

This "offset" idea is a constant in Utah liquor politics. Up until 2009, any bar that sold liquor (we also have "taverns" which sell only 4% ABV beer) was required to be a private club - anyone could join, but they had to charge for memberships. So you had to pay for the privilege of drinking liquor (at each bar you went to) before even buying a drink. When they finally did away with that weird alcohol law, the offset was the Zion Curtain. No matter what good change is made, a bad change accompanies it. Every time. And THAT is really the weirdest thing about alcohol laws in Utah.

squire
03-15-2013, 07:40
Jim all we can do is face such adversity braced with strong drink.

HighInTheMtns
03-15-2013, 07:49
Jim all we can do is face such adversity braced with strong drink.
At least I only have to pay for my drink now.

p_elliott
03-15-2013, 08:36
More on this, taken from ksl.com:


Utah is known to run aggressive sting operations, sending minors who are employed by the state into bars where they are far more persistent than a kid with a fake ID who is scared of getting busted. Bars have been forced out of business over these fines without serving alcohol to a minor, just by being tricked by a state employee.

This "offset" idea is a constant in Utah liquor politics. Up until 2009, any bar that sold liquor (we also have "taverns" which sell only 4% ABV beer) was required to be a private club - anyone could join, but they had to charge for memberships. So you had to pay for the privilege of drinking liquor (at each bar you went to) before even buying a drink. When they finally did away with that weird alcohol law, the offset was the Zion Curtain. No matter what good change is made, a bad change accompanies it. Every time. And THAT is really the weirdest thing about alcohol laws in Utah.

They do this in Iowa too and with cigarettes as well.

Smokewagon
03-15-2013, 11:12
Note that "3.2" beer is a measurement of alcohol by weight. This is actually 4% ABV beer. Not a lot less than a typical Bud Light or whatever.

Correct, I mistakenly stated ABV instead of ABW.

~SW

Old Dusty
03-15-2013, 12:05
No Sunday sales in Indiana. Liquor stores are closed and the big boxes/CVS etc cant sell. Most either rope off their alcohol aisles or post signs. Exceptions for restaurants bars wineries and brewpubs.

smknjoe
03-15-2013, 12:13
I've never lived any place where they DID sell whiskey on Sunday (retail.)

squire
03-15-2013, 12:14
More reason to stock up.

higgins
03-15-2013, 12:18
You can buy liquor here in Virginia and some parts of Maryland on Sundays. It's a pretty recent change, however.

smknjoe
03-15-2013, 12:23
I've lived in Va. and WVa. Do they sell on Sunday in WVa. now?

higgins
03-15-2013, 12:58
I've only been to WV a few times, but I remember having to stock up because the stores were closed on Sundays. They did sell liquor at the 7-Eleven though, which I found unusual.

SFS
03-15-2013, 13:10
I've never lived any place where they DID sell whiskey on Sunday (retail.)

You might want to move to Florida. Though we don't have Larceny.

MyOldKyDram
03-15-2013, 15:26
Lexington has Sunday sells, but the city up the road does not. Such is KY.

PaulO
03-15-2013, 15:29
Indiana has some odd laws. Number one is; no retail sales on Sunday. You can buy all the drinks you want from a restaurant or bar that sells food on Sunday. My brother in law told me about a bar in Bloomington that has a Hot Pocket in their freezer. It's a $40 item on the menu in a dive. It allows them to be open on Sunday :lol: Liquor stores and some bars sell cold beer to go. Grocery stores and drug stores sell beer, but can't sell it cold. Somehow, some grocery stores sell cold wine. Liquor stores are not allowed to sell cold soft drinks. Most liquor stores have a soda pop machine outside by their front door.
Has anyone ever challenged the Sunday laws as unconstitutional? It seems like the government establishing an official religion. On the other hand, if they won't allow liquor sales, how can they allow tobacco and lottery on Sunday?

Enoch
03-15-2013, 15:46
Indiana has some odd laws. Number one is; no retail sales on Sunday. You can buy all the drinks you want from a restaurant or bar that sells food on Sunday. My brother in law told me about a bar in Bloomington that has a Hot Pocket in their freezer. It's a $40 item on the menu in a dive. It allows them to be open on Sunday :lol: Liquor stores and some bars sell cold beer to go. Grocery stores and drug stores sell beer, but can't sell it cold. Somehow, some grocery stores sell cold wine. Liquor stores are not allowed to sell cold soft drinks. Most liquor stores have a soda pop machine outside by their front door.
Has anyone ever challenged the Sunday laws as unconstitutional? It seems like the government establishing an official religion. On the other hand, if they won't allow liquor sales, how can they allow tobacco and lottery on Sunday?

I think it is unconstitutional, and I say this as a former Baptist minister, but as my law professor said: "Everything is legal until there is a plaintiff."

squire
03-15-2013, 15:59
On my first job the senior partner told me, "Sometimes the law means what it says and sometimes it means what we make it say".

PaulO
03-15-2013, 18:12
:soapbox: I can't think of anything else that can't be sold one day a week. I guess it iritates me when I visit friends or family in other towns, and all the stores I would like to visit are closed, because it's Sunday. I'm talking about places that have much better selection than what I have nearby. :rolleyes: If a business chooses to be closed on Sunday (on their own) that doesn't bother me at all.

tyerod
03-15-2013, 20:46
No Sunday sales in Indiana. Liquor stores are closed and the big boxes/CVS etc cant sell. Most either rope off their alcohol aisles or post signs. Exceptions for restaurants bars wineries and brewpubs.
Used to live in S. Chicago suburbs. Illinois didn't sell booze on Sundays till noon. Around 11:45 I would get the call from my Highland, IN friends basically stating "You know what day it is". I did volenteer work at Mammoth Cave National Park in KY. Still many dry counties down there. Mammoth Cave NP was in one of them. Nearest liquors store was 40 miles away in Bowling Green. Made that drive many times. In Colorado liquor stores couldn't be open on Sundays until a few years ago. Convenience and grocery stores only sell 3.2 and no wine or spirits. A person, or company, can only have one liquor license. California, for being the backward ass libby state it is, seem to be the most normal to me. I was surprised to walk down the whiskey, wine and beer isle when I was out there.

HighInTheMtns
03-16-2013, 01:41
A person, or company, can only have one liquor license.
This is why Colorado has such great stores and such great bars. Gotta make good use of that one license.

jburlowski
03-16-2013, 05:27
Has anyone ever challenged the Sunday laws as unconstitutional? It seems like the government establishing an official religion. On the other hand, if they won't allow liquor sales, how can they allow tobacco and lottery on Sunday?

The courts have consistently found these sorts of laws as constitutional under the 21st Amendment.

sailor22
03-16-2013, 06:19
It's surprising that one of the groups lobbying for mandatory closed Sundays in Ga. is the Liquor Retailers. Their reasoning is that there is a finite demand and that demand will buy the same amount in six days as it would in seven. Being open a seventh day wouldn't generate any more revenue but would require them to pay the help an extra day. Less profit.
Thinking about it, the people most effected are the travelers and visitors who are surprised by the closed Sunday rule. The locals who drink plan on it and it isn't much of an inconvenience.

callmeox
03-16-2013, 06:45
For the same reason, many Sunday retail permit holders in Ohio are not open.

I like that it is the retailers decision and not a statewide mandate.

MyOldKyDram
03-16-2013, 06:48
Right. There's nothing saying that you have to be open. If you don't want to be for whatever reason, or it's simply not worth it then close up shop on Sunday. Easy enough.

callmeox
03-16-2013, 06:52
I think there's an unspoken reason as well when retailers fight against Sunday sales. They don't want to spread 6 days of sales across 7 days of business *and* they don't want the guy up the street to steal sales by taking the plunge into Sunday retail.

squire
03-16-2013, 07:04
As a consumer I want them open for my convenience, if I owned a store I wouldn't like to be forced to stay open 7 days a week. Guess who would wind up with the Sunday shift.

wadewood
03-16-2013, 08:13
Texas liquor stores are also closed on Sunday and the retailers fight to keep it this way. If these retailers think total sales would not increase they are wrong; http://money.cnn.com/2008/07/01/smallbusiness/blue_laws.fsb/index.htm. They will increase 4-6%. This has been consistent with repeals of blue laws for retail items to booze.

The other blue law we still have in Texas is Car Dealerships. Interestingly, they have to close either Sat. or Sunday. Most close on Sunday, but a few select to stay open on Sunday.

squire
03-16-2013, 08:43
Liquor is just such a touchy subject with so many well meaning but misguided folks. I once had a senior State Senator tell me over drinks that if he voted for any law favoring liquor on a Friday every pulpit in his home town would denounce him on Sunday.

ILLfarmboy
03-16-2013, 16:35
The courts have consistently found these sorts of laws as constitutional under the 21st Amendment.

Christmas tree's and nativity scenes in public squares, if someone pitches a fit about them, yes, but where has anyone had the balls to fight Sunday sale bans, and won. It seems to me a prohibition on Sunday sales would be analogous to a ban on selling meat on Fridays during Lent. I don't see how it would pass Constitutional muster, but where has anyone successfully fought it in court?

I hate the fact that I can't buy alcohol on Sunday before noon. It makes shopping damn inconvienent. Saturdays are for fun and Sundays are for re-upping on supplies; milk, bread, other perishables and stuff for my lunch. I like to get that out of the way early and get back home.

gblick
03-22-2013, 23:12
-rebates and/or coupons offered by manufacturers are prohibited

So that's why we didn't get the rebate on Larceny!

And I still haven't tried it..

wadewood
03-23-2013, 06:14
So that's why we didn't get the rebate on Larceny!

And I still haven't tried it..

actually, I did get the HH rebate; they sent me a crisp $5 bill in the mail. Guess they have not read TX liquor laws.

squire
03-23-2013, 06:23
Then I wouldn't tell 'em.

ebo
03-23-2013, 12:04
PA's are pretty simple., If you want a good bottle, travel to another state or order it online from the only vendor allowed to ship to the state (which is the state itself)

Ohio and PA must share the same law. :lol: