PDA

View Full Version : Nick names for bourbons



Alden
04-05-2013, 13:53
Recently I heard some one refer to drinking "kickin' chicken" when he was talking about Wild Turkey.

What are some other nick names you have heard?

loki993
04-05-2013, 13:57
Recently I heard some one refer to drinking "kickin' chicken" when he was talking about Wild Turkey.

What are some other nick names you have heard?

You'd never heard that before? Thats the only one I can think of off the top of my head.

kickert
04-05-2013, 13:59
Could be Fighting Cock as well. (although probably WT)

Alden
04-05-2013, 13:59
You'd never heard that before? Thats the only one I can think of off the top of my head.

No, I never have.

There must be some others.

kickert
04-05-2013, 14:01
Virginia Gentleman is sometimes called "The Fox" because of the picture on the bottle.

PaulO
04-05-2013, 14:10
I've also heard WT referred to as bird, or the bird. A lot of stuff is also known by initials.

Alden
04-05-2013, 14:16
When I was a teenager it seemed like there were only two American whiskeys available, Jack Daniels or Early Times.

We used to call JD "Black Jack Shellac".

Our neighbor across the street was always tipsy on Canadian Club or Seagram's 7. He just called it "I'll have another one."

cowdery
04-05-2013, 15:59
"Black Jack," for Old No. 7 brand, is a nickname. So is just calling Jim Beam, "Jim," though it's not particularly clever. I've heard Southern Comfort called "The Old Leg-Spreader." Van Winkle Special Reserve is generally known in these parts as "Lot B." We use initials here constantly, but even the general public calls Canadian Club "CC." Most of the common nicknames are just shortenings, like "Crown" for Crown Royal, or "Knob" for Knob Creek. I can't think of anything else really comparable to "Kickin' Chicken." Maybe "Old Overcoat" for Old Overholt Rye is similar.

Alden
04-05-2013, 16:03
"Black Jack," for Old No. 7 brand, is a nickname. So is just calling Jim Beam, "Jim," though it's not particularly clever. I've heard Southern Comfort called "The Old Leg-Spreader." Van Winkle Special Reserve is generally known in these parts as "Lot B." We use initials here constantly, but even the general public calls Canadian Club "CC." Most of the common nicknames are just shortenings, like "Crown" for Crown Royal, or "Knob" for Knob Creek. I can't think of anything else really comparable to "Kickin' Chicken." Maybe "Old Overcoat" for Old Overholt Rye is similar.

:lol: That it is! :lol:

ethangsmith
04-06-2013, 19:54
I've heard of Old Grand Dad called "The Dad." Maker's Mark often seems to be referred to simply as "Maker's" as well.

FlounderinDC
04-06-2013, 22:48
In college we drank a lot of Wild Turkey...we always called it "Gobble Gobble".

fishnbowljoe
04-06-2013, 22:59
How 'bout "Old Croak" referring to Old Crow?

straightwhiskeyruffneck
04-07-2013, 00:03
My family has always called old grandad "OGD"
witch also stands for "oh god damn!" Witch makes sense lol

tmckenzie
04-07-2013, 06:35
for some reason, my daddy, who I wish I had a nickel for every half a gallon of ten high he drank, would call all bourbon, devil juice. Imagine me a 5 year old kid, going to the devil juice store with him. Stay in the truck he said. I imagined all sorts of things going on in that store. But he also drank it with coke and stirred it with the handle of a hair brush. So I should not have expected better.

Alden
04-07-2013, 09:24
for some reason, my daddy, who I wish I had a nickel for every half a gallon of ten high he drank, would call all bourbon, devil juice. Imagine me a 5 year old kid, going to the devil juice store with him. Stay in the truck he said. I imagined all sorts of things going on in that store. But he also drank it with coke and stirred it with the handle of a hair brush. So I should not have expected better.

That is interesting.

:lol:

Alden
04-07-2013, 09:31
My father's family was pure John Knox/Calvinist/ TeeTotallers. He never drank, yet was irritable enough most of the time that if he had been a drinker, I expect both my mother and myself would have grown accustomed to regular beatings.

He was a WWII veteran. He wasn't a physically violent man, but he had the "potential", if you know what I mean.

I sometimes wonder how he would have ended up if he had been a drinker, like most of the dads in the neighborhood were. He died from series of heart attacks when he was 42. Maybe a little alcohol would have been good for him.

squire
04-07-2013, 09:45
I've heard a fair number of descriptive terms, Panther Juice, Who Hit John, Bottled Courage, that sort of thing . . . phrases which may in fact say more about the speaker than the product.

Josh
04-07-2013, 12:34
Red Gag for Red Stag is a popular one around here. Baby Saz for the standard Sazerac Rye. Some dusties have nicknames too. BUB or Butt Ugly Bottle is the nickname for the old bottles of Elmer T. Lee.

15114

And let's not forget Cheesy Gold Foil/Label, Wild Turkey 12 y/o and Cheesy Gold Chain Rock Hill Farms. And Split Label for the Wild Turkey 12 with a two-piece label.

OscarV
04-07-2013, 12:41
Red Gag for Red Stag is a popular one around here.

Is it popular or does it have good shelf presence and it just looks like it is popular?

Josh
04-07-2013, 12:44
Is it popular or does it have good shelf presence and it just looks like it is popular?

I meant the nickname is popular. I can't speak to how well the stuff is selling.

Alden
04-07-2013, 14:34
Is it popular or does it have good shelf presence and it just looks like it is popular?

The young un's probably like it. I know some 20-somethings that love all kinds of super sweet drinks.

JB64
04-07-2013, 23:53
Back in my college days when we had money we drank JD black. When we were low on money which was most of the time we bought EWB. At the time we thought EWB was a cheap attempt to copy JD. We called it Jack Junior. Now I prefer EW over JD even though it is half the price.

Restaurant man
04-08-2013, 00:46
Back in my college days when we had money we drank JD black. When we were low on money which was most of the time we bought EWB. At the time we thought EWB was a cheap attempt to copy JD. We called it Jack Junior. Now I prefer EW over JD even though it is half the price.

'i was so much older then, I'm younger than that now'. BD

luther.r
04-08-2013, 09:19
My buddy and I call Kentucky Gentleman "Eight Buck Kentuck."

loki993
04-08-2013, 12:01
Is it popular or does it have good shelf presence and it just looks like it is popular?

I think its pretty popular....I try it and it makes my teeth hurts. Dont know kinda like SoCo......hey there's another one lol

Alden
04-08-2013, 14:09
I think its pretty popular....I try it and it makes my teeth hurts. Dont know kinda like SoCo......hey there's another one lol

Yeah, and they (the young un's) love Southern Comfort too.

Anything sweet, they love it.

jburlowski
04-08-2013, 15:49
Is it popular or does it have good shelf presence and it just looks like it is popular?

My understanding is that Red Stag sold some 500, 000 cases in its thrird year on the market and is continuing to grow.

cowdery
04-08-2013, 17:04
My understanding is that Red Stag sold some 500, 000 cases in its thrird year on the market and is continuing to grow.

I don't have the numbers handy but it's something like that.

Alden
04-08-2013, 17:43
I have some young redneck hunting buddies.

They tell me their honeys love that Jack Daniels Honey.

kickert
04-09-2013, 00:50
We always called Sothern Comfort SoCo

Bourbon Boiler
04-09-2013, 18:53
I have heard "Kickin' Chicken" before, but I always thought it meant Fighting Cock until I opened this thread.

Alden
04-10-2013, 04:47
Where does the term "boiler maker" come from?

squire
04-10-2013, 05:42
Boiler makers are guys who work in the metal fabricating industry and go to the local bar after work for a beer and a shot.

unclebunk
04-10-2013, 06:58
My friends and I call OGD BIB "Andy" because our friend looks just like the guy on the label.:grin:

unclebunk
04-10-2013, 07:02
I have heard "Kickin' Chicken" before, but I always thought it meant Fighting Cock until I opened this thread. Me too. That's what we call FC all the time. Now, my brother always called WT101 "brain burglar" because he could never remember the night before when he woke up in the morning.

bigtoys
04-10-2013, 13:26
I seem to recall calling Jack Daniels "Uncle Jack"...maybe too much of an inferred relationship with the booze.

tmckenzie
04-11-2013, 03:47
That is interesting.

:lol:

Hair brush out lasted him.
Was driving his truck 2 years after he died. Grabbed it to brush my hair, handle broke. All that whiskey finally took it's toll. I almost cried.

Borchard
04-17-2013, 13:20
Maybe I'm already becoming a bourbon snob, but when i go to a bar, and the only choices they have ar: JB, JB, and MM, and the bartender asks what I want, I tend to use the same name for them all: "No Thank You"

Alden
04-17-2013, 14:00
Maybe I'm already becoming a bourbon snob, but when i go to a bar, and the only choices they have ar: JB, JB, and MM, and the bartender asks what I want, I tend to use the same name for them all: "No Thank You"

I say, "I think I'll just have a beer."

benpearson
06-01-2013, 08:22
I work in a liquor store, and customers often have the strangest nicknames for products. I'm interested in hearing some of the nicknames from other regions of the country if people would be so kind as to post. The most common one around here would have to be 100 pound grand dad.

squire
06-01-2013, 08:59
Don't believe I've heard that one ben.

tigerlam92
06-01-2013, 09:04
A recent thread on the same topic
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19763

There is a good but small list and discussion there.

Cheers
Hugh

393foureyedfox
06-01-2013, 10:11
I work in a liquor store, and customers often have the strangest nicknames for products. I'm interested in hearing some of the nicknames from other regions of the country if people would be so kind as to post. The most common one around here would have to be 100 pound grand dad.

nicknames are usually shorter than the real name......'100 pound grand dad' doesnt roll off the tongue like 'bourbon'

PaulO
06-01-2013, 10:20
How about calling bourbon "juice"?

TBC
06-01-2013, 12:24
I've heard Yukon Jack referred to as "Yukon Yack" on more than a few occasions.

smokinjoe
06-01-2013, 14:36
How about calling bourbon "juice"?

Juice is the norm now, Paul. Actually, the nickname could be calling juice "whiskey"...:lol:

troyce
06-01-2013, 15:22
Juice is the norm now, Paul. Actually, the nickname could be calling juice "whiskey"...:lol:

I love that term.. " Juice" for bourbon, irish whiskey, rum , flavored vodka; all things good.

ebo
06-01-2013, 18:48
I've heard Yukon Jack referred to as "Yukon Yack" on more than a few occasions.

Unfortunately, I have personal experience with the reason for that nickname.:rolleyes:

tigerlam92
06-01-2013, 19:21
For nicknames, when we type we use acronyms a lot but does anyone use that verbally as well such as a nickname type of usage?

Oddly OGD sounds almost ok to use maybe cause it sounds like OCD. :)

But can't really say PVW or GTS maybe cause "Pappy" and "Stagg" is easier.

squire
06-01-2013, 19:56
Among members of my Father's generation I heard references to 'Grand Dad, Charter, Taylor and Crow', dropping the 'Old' but retaining a proper name.

Stones
06-01-2013, 23:24
Maybe I'm already becoming a bourbon snob, but when i go to a bar, and the only choices they have ar: JB, JB, and MM, and the bartender asks what I want, I tend to use the same name for them all: "No Thank You"

I have also become a bourbon snob, the usual suspects at any average pub are JB and JD, WT if you're lucky and Slate if you're really unlucky or as some of my mates refer to it as 'doesn't rate'... ;)