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View Full Version : Do Stainless Steel Flasks Mess With Bourbon Flavor?



Nick Danger
04-12-2013, 23:16
I have a new 5oz stainless steel flask that I haven't used yet. Can I expect that the stainless steel will mess with the flavor of the bourbon? I've read that I'm not supposed to leave anything in the flask for more than a day or two. If I pour and drink whatever is in the flask the same day, can I expect the flavor to stay true?

If not, I may seek out a glass flask.

Nick

Restaurant man
04-13-2013, 00:43
Ive never had a problem. I do as a matter of practice empty the flask before putting it away :drinking:

darylld911
04-13-2013, 06:45
I've had bourbon in a stainless flask for longer than a few days (maybe up to 10) and never had a problem with it influencing the taste. What I found might happen though is that whatever type of seal you have in the cap of the flask could go bad with leaving alcohol in it for longer than a few days. I'm with Restaurant Man on emptying the flask before putting it away (the long stretch I had was traveling and literally forgetting I brought the flask when my destination had some great offerings - and only upon unpacking finding it! And then emptying it :grin:)

mrviognier
04-13-2013, 06:48
Unless somehow compromised (deep gash, pitting, etc.), stainless steel will not impart anything to your whiskey. Heck, that's what distilleries all use to store whiskey in after it's taken out of wood, albiet a bit bigger than flask size. :grin:

hectic1
04-13-2013, 06:54
Unless somehow compromised (deep gash, pitting, etc.), stainless steel will not impart anything to your whiskey. Heck, that's what distilleries all use to store whiskey in after it's taken out of wood, albiet a bit bigger than flask size. :grin: That's exactly what I was gonna say Mat. The bigger effect will be if you have remnants lefts from previous pours. ;)

fricky
04-13-2013, 07:52
Keep in mind that all stainless steel alloys are not the same. To be called Stainless Steel, the alloy requires a minimum of 11% Chromium and the balance Iron. The more corrosion resistant stainless steels such as those used in food processing and bourbon storage typically contain about 18% Chromium and 8/10% Nickel. That alloy is typically referred to as Type 304 or an 18-8 stainless. Typically, you can tell the difference with a magnet. The less corrosion resistant alloy will have a strong attraction to a magnet. The Type 304 stainless alloy will generally have no attraction to a magnet. If Type 304 is severely cold worked, it may show slight attraction to a magnet.

mrviognier
04-13-2013, 10:12
Yes, there ARE dozens of types/grades of stainless; however, all of the ones used in the production of tanks, flasks, etc. will not (in and of themselves) impart any flavor to whiskey.

SMOWK
04-13-2013, 10:31
I like this one.

http://www.amazon.com/Bormioli-Rocco-Ounce-Glass-Pocket/dp/B003R0GU0E/ref=pd_sim_k_1

callmeox
04-13-2013, 10:36
Yes, there ARE dozens of types/grades of stainless; however, all of the ones used in the production of tanks, flasks, etc. will not (in and of themselves) impart any flavor to whiskey.

Unless they were assembled poorly or they have reactive non-stainless components.

fricky
04-13-2013, 10:49
Unless they were assembled poorly or they have reactive non-stainless components.

That is true. Is the alloy used in the screw cap the same as that used to make the flask? If the screw cap is machined, it is most likely a free-machining grade. Free machining grades typically contain sulfur in the form of sulfides which improve machinability. Could prolonged exposure of whiskey to sulfides in the steel potentially affect the taste. Other elements that can have a positive effect on machinability are Lead and Selenium.

I not convinced that all off-shore manufacturers of flasks utilize the most appropriate stainless steel.

PaulO
04-13-2013, 13:27
I would also add that it's a good idea to wash anything new with plenty of dish soap and hot water. Stainless items tend to come coated with residue of oils or chemicals from manufacturing. I still prefer to re-use a glass pint or half pint bottle.

ebo
04-13-2013, 16:39
I've used a cheap Coleman stainless flask on the golf course for the last three years. I've had no problem with it at all. I do keep it clean and dry between uses, though.

grantsi
04-13-2013, 18:05
Wow...do I feel like an idiot. I got a new one back in March ( purchased from Saks...which means nothing as it relates to quality other than the fact that I probably paid too much )...I poured some good juice in it and put it in my briefcase. Then put it on my desk at work. Any time I'm at the office past 9pm, I like having access to something to mellow the pain of being at work so late. I've refilled it a few times, but so far haven't considered the affect I might be having on the flask degrading - I assumed its job in life was to contain alchol.

ChainWhip
04-13-2013, 19:21
I had one of these from a long time ago:

http://www.snowpeak.com/flask-titanium-l-t-013.html

Pricey but it was a gift and its been reliable, safe for liquors, & lightweight to boot.

I recently got a free stainless steel China-made flask and here was the result:

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?19767-Cheap-(free)-flasks

I'll be saving the 200ml bottles from now on though.

That Amazon link looks like its a cool flask too - I think I saw one @ Container Store recently.

MauiSon
04-13-2013, 22:06
My 'Band of Rebels' flask is completely non-magnetic and I washed it thoroughly, but I still noted a flavor change on first use. So, I filled it with cheap vodka for a week, dumped and rinsed. That seems to have cured it.

darylld911
04-14-2013, 06:27
My 'Band of Rebels' flask is completely non-magnetic and I washed it thoroughly, but I still noted a flavor change on first use. So, I filled it with cheap vodka for a week, dumped and rinsed. That seems to have cured it.

I use stainless canteens for water at work, and was told that if I ever detect any influence on flavor to fill it with a 50/50 solution of white vinegar and water, and let it sit for 24 hours. Then dump, rinse, let dry - and resume use. I've done that a few times (granted - these are cheap canteens :lol:) but that might be worth a shot.