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Alden
04-20-2013, 10:08
I've never had an Old Fashioned. Thinking about trying to make one. Does this recipe sound right to you?

2 oz bourbon whiskey (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc6.html)
2 dashes Angostura® bitters (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc95.html)
1 splash water (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc52.html)
1 tsp sugar (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc605.html)
1 maraschino cherry (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc300.html)
1 orange (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc97.html) wedge



Mix sugar, water and angostura bitters in an old-fashioned glass. Drop in a cherry and an orange wedge. Muddle into a paste using a muddler or the back end of a spoon. Pour in bourbon, fill with ice cubes, and stir.

Alden
04-20-2013, 10:11
Are you supposed to mash up the orange and cherry into a sugar paste?

Ejmharris
04-20-2013, 10:35
I've never had an Old Fashioned. Thinking about trying to make one. Does this recipe sound right to you?

2 oz bourbon whiskey (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc6.html)
2 dashes Angostura® bitters (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc95.html)
1 splash water (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc52.html)
1 tsp sugar (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc605.html)
1 maraschino cherry (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc300.html)
1 orange (http://www.drinksmixer.com/desc97.html) wedge



Mix sugar, water and angostura bitters in an old-fashioned glass. Drop in a cherry and an orange wedge. Muddle into a paste using a muddler or the back end of a spoon. Pour in bourbon, fill with ice cubes, and stir.








This sounds about right. I have never muddled the cherry though. Would add a little sweetness to the old fashioned. I prefer to use blood oranges but any will work. Also best to use the organs peel to rub across rim of glass and drop in cocktail. Not sure it adds anything but my favorite bartender always does it that way. For the sugar and water try to get water warm so the sugar dissolves properly. Just a little water will do. You can also get simple syrup at the liquor store to do the same. It is normally cheap and easy. Grab yourself some different bitters to mix the cocktail up from time to time.


Mike

sku
04-20-2013, 10:40
Personally, I like the most basic Old Fashioned with no fruit. Same recipe, just skip the fruit and muddling except to garnish with an orange and/or lemon rind.

It's much easier to use simple syrup than sugar and water, but if you don't mind expending a little effort in muddling the sugar and water, go for it.

I also like a lot of bitters, so I'd probably shake 5 or 6 drops in, but that's just me.

Enjoy!

michang5
04-20-2013, 10:54
Here's my simple syrup recipe:
The most common syrup is the 2:1 formula, which is pretty much standard for most cocktails. To make this, simply add 2 cups of sugar and 1 cup water to a pot and gently heat until all of the sugar is dissolved. Pour the syrup into a clean bottle and it's ready to use. You don't need to boil the water when making simple syrup.


A couple of suggestions that will make your simple syrup better include adding 1/4 cup of corn syrup to the mixture. This will help prevent crystallization of the sugar, since it is a super saturated solution. The other suggestion is to add one or two ounces of vodka or neutral grain spirit to the simple syrup after it has been bottled. This will help prevent mold or bacteria from growing.

----

Once that's done, I use this Old Fashioned recipe:
2 oz. (1/4 cup, 4 tbsp) bourbon or rye whiskey
2-3 dashes Angostura bitters
1/4 oz. (1-1/2 tsp, although I prefer 1 tsp) simple syrup (2:1 ratio sugar to water)
Orange peel
Ice cubes



In an Old Fashioned glass, add the syrup, bitters and orange peel. Use a muddler (I use back of our butter knives which have a smooth, rounded end) to gently press the orange peel to release the citrus oils. Add the whiskey and stir. Add ice cubes and stir again.


It's delicious!

Alden
04-20-2013, 11:05
So, it sounds like whiskey with sugary cherry/orange flavors added, over ice

Pretty simple really.

tanstaafl2
04-20-2013, 11:47
So, it sounds like whiskey with sugary cherry/orange flavors added, over ice

Pretty simple really.

I like to have the Old Fashioned the old fashioned way most of the time. To do this I tend to defer to David Wondrich for suggestions.

So my suggestion, despite what Dale DeGroff might say, is if you want a fruit salad, make a fruit salad. But keep 'em out of you Old Fashioned! Save the cherries for a Manhattan and have your oranges for breakfast.

Simple syrup is simpler than using a cube of sugar but sometimes it is fun to start with the traditional cube if you want to make a little show out of it. I also tend to think of standard simple syrup as 1:1 sugar and water. A 2:1 simple syrup is what I would call a "rich" simple syrup. In any case the difference between 1:1 and 2:1 can be significant so keep that in mind. I also like using Demerara sugar when I can get it. Getting it from the Demerara region of Guyana is possible but it is usually easier to find Demerara sugar from Mauritius these days.

The old fashioned "Old Fashioned"

1 cube Demerara sugar (or substitute 1/2 teaspoon loose Demerara sugar)
1/2 oz water
3 dashes (or so depending on taste) of bitters (Angostura or Fee Bros. whiskey barrel aged bitters are common options)
2 oz Rye (or Bourbon for a little sweeter drink) as desired - If you want to be really, really "old fashioned" about your Old Fashioned consider subbing Bols genever (the barrel aged version is particularly nice) or a decent Cognac (I like Pierre Ferrand 1840 which was purpose made for this sort of thing to be more like Cognacs of old). That is more likely what was used back when the cocktail first came into being in the early 1800's.

Muddle your sugar cube (or loose sugar) with the water and bitters. Add a large ice cube or two (or a nice round cube) in a single Old Fashioned glass and then the 2 oz of the spirit of choice.

If you just have to get fruit involved somehow twist a thin lemon peel over the top, rub it around the rim and discard.

Another old fashioned touch that the professor notes would be to add a dash, as in the kind of dash from a bitters bottle, of absinthe along with the lemon peel for a bit of variety. Just remember a little goes a long way!

Alden
04-20-2013, 12:08
OK, interesting recipes. Thanks for your input guys.

I'm sipping the one I just made right now. Here's what I ended up doing:

2 teaspoons white sugar mixed with about a half oz warm water. Then I put in 6 drops of Angostura bitters. Then added a small wedge of orange and two cherries, and mixed it again with the spoon. Finally, added two oz of 4Roses YL and three cubes of ice. Mixed again.

It's sweet, and fruity, that's for sure.

Alden
04-20-2013, 12:16
Well that went down pretty fast.

I think I will be making more of those in the future.

:)

Alphanumeric
04-20-2013, 13:56
Add a large ice cube or two (or a nice round cube)


my cubes only seem to come in the angular variety. :(

Alphanumeric
04-20-2013, 14:04
OK, interesting recipes. Thanks for your input guys.

I'm sipping the one I just made right now. Here's what I ended up doing:

2 teaspoons white sugar mixed with about a half oz warm water. Then I put in 6 drops of Angostura bitters. Then added a small wedge of orange and two cherries, and mixed it again with the spoon. Finally, added two oz of 4Roses YL and three cubes of ice. Mixed again.

It's sweet, and fruity, that's for sure.

Depending on how you found that one, you might want to consider cutting the sugar back to nearer a tsp and replacing your fruit with peels. You seemed to have enjoyed it as it was. However, experimentation with variables enables you to discover your ideal formula. This one may have been good, but perhaps you'll find a drier, more spirit-forward Old Fashioned sublime.

Alden
04-20-2013, 15:14
Depending on how you found that one, you might want to consider cutting the sugar back to nearer a tsp and replacing your fruit with peels. You seemed to have enjoyed it as it was. However, experimentation with variables enables you to discover your ideal formula. This one may have been good, but perhaps you'll find a drier, more spirit-forward Old Fashioned sublime.

Yes, next time I will try it with less sugar and I'll use a higher proof whiskey or rye.

This was 80 proof 4R, but I have some 90 proof rye, and some OGD 114 that I would like to try.

Sublime sounds good. I like the sound of that. :)

ratcheer
04-21-2013, 18:29
Sounds like I'm late, but I will give my recipe anyway. I like to keep my Old Fashioned simple.

1 tsp sugar
Just enough water to muddle the sugar, maybe 1 to 2 tsp
Several dashes Angostura, probably about 4
A shot of bourbon or rye
Several ice cubes - whatever seems right for the glass

Tim

TheNovaMan
04-23-2013, 22:17
I use the recipe pretty much straight out of my dad's Mr. Boston Deluxe Official Bartender's Guide (1974 edition):

Into an old-fashioned glass put a small cube of sugar, a dash of Angostura bitter, a teaspoon of water and muddle well. Add 2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Blended Whisky. Stir. Add twist of lemon peel and ice cubes. Decorate with slice of orange, lemon, and a cherry. Serve with a swiggle stick. I do two drops of Angostura on a sugar cube, a teaspoon of water, and mash it with my thumb. Then I swirl for an annoyingly long time to dissolve the sugar, add one ice cube and two ounces of bourbon, and there I go. That's plenty enough drink prep, so I don't bother with garnishes.

It's not something I do often, because I usually just drink my bourbon on a rock or two, or neat if it's good stuff. I wouldn't put anything nicer than EWB in an Old Fashioned, but that's just me.



Edit: if I were preparing a drink for a guest, I would be classy and use garnishes and a muddling stick instead of my thumb, but I'm the only guy I know in all of SW MI who likes Old Fashioneds, so for myself I just use my own thumb and skip the garnishes.

steeltownbbq
04-24-2013, 19:13
Because I'm lazy - I use 1 part WT American Honey for the sweetness; and 2 parts WT 101 with several bitters shakes. Quick, easy and good

Barclay Beach
04-24-2013, 19:27
I make mine with muddled fruit -- it adds an extra dimension. Otherwise, I'd prefer to drink the whiskey on it's own without all the sugar. But that's just me.

squire
04-24-2013, 21:09
Harry Truman told the story of when he and Bess moved into the White House she ordered Old Fashioned cocktails as their pre dinner drinks and when they arrived she sent them back with instructions they needed more whisky. This happened a couple more times when the frustrated White House chef poured Straight Bourbon over rocks and sent them upstairs. Mrs. Truman said "tell the chef this is just the way we like 'em, old fashioned".

TheNovaMan
04-24-2013, 21:28
That's awesome! :D

Trey Manthey
04-24-2013, 21:41
Based on some recommendations, I've been using gum syrup and Bitter Truth Aromatic bitters cocktails for my Old Fashioned recipe lately. The syrup adds a silky texture when sipping compared to a sugar cube or simple syrup, and the bitters are less artificial smelling compared to Angostura.

TheNovaMan
04-24-2013, 21:48
I have a 10 oz bottle of Angostura, which for me is probably more than a lifetime supply, so I'm hesitant to ask... are other bitters significantly better than Angostura?

Trey Manthey
04-24-2013, 22:10
If you mean significant in the regard that it makes a difference for the better, then yes, I vouch for Bitter Truth Aromatic bitters. I've also sampled Scrappy's Aromatic bitters. Both are superior products at a premium price (~$16 for a good sized bottle). However, the difference is not so large that it will transform a cocktail recipe that calls for Angostura. You're not missing out on much, but I think you would be pleasantly surprised.

When it comes down to it, I would be happy cutting my huge bitters collection down to Angostura, Regan's, and Peychaud's.

ratcheer
04-25-2013, 06:21
Because I'm lazy - I use 1 part WT American Honey for the sweetness; and 2 parts WT 101 with several bitters shakes. Quick, easy and good

That is a good idea.

Tim

TheNovaMan
04-25-2013, 21:23
If you mean significant in the regard that it makes a difference for the better, then yes, I vouch for Bitter Truth Aromatic bitters. I've also sampled Scrappy's Aromatic bitters. Both are superior products at a premium price (~$16 for a good sized bottle). However, the difference is not so large that it will transform a cocktail recipe that calls for Angostura. You're not missing out on much, but I think you would be pleasantly surprised.

When it comes down to it, I would be happy cutting my huge bitters collection down to Angostura, Regan's, and Peychaud's. Ah, thanks for the info. I'll stick with Angostura for now, but I'll probably try something else eventually. I'll try to keep Bitter Truth in mind.

DBM
04-27-2013, 23:35
I started a long time ago enjoying a sweet, fruity old fashioned recipe:

2 packets of sugar
5 strong dashes of Angostura
2 luxardo cherries
1/2 orange wedge

Muddle everything

Add 3oz bourbon, 4 ice cubes and a splash of soda water

It was sweet and fruity with lots of strong flavors.

Over time I tweaked and adjusted all the ingredients as I trended to a drier, more aromatic and less fruity recipe. Currently I do:

1/2 teaspoon sugar
4 strong dashes of Boker's bitters
2 dashes of Fee Brothers cherry bitters

Swirl, mix and generally wait forever for sugar to dissolve

Add 2.5 oz bourbon, 3 ice cubes. Express an orange peel and rim glass.

The expressed peel and cherry bitters add great flavor without clouding the drink or having any annoying fruit in the glass.

I will slightly adjust any of the ingredients depending on my mood. I love playing around with different bitters, and sometimes I will use a rounded 1/2 teaspoon of sugar for a touch more sweetness. Flaming the expressed peel is fun too.

ewj
07-16-2013, 08:04
I've read through this topic a couple of days ago, so forgive me if I write something that's already been stated.

I'm a passionate Old Fashioned drinker, so I'm gonna share my recipe. I don't like the idea of muddling fruit into your classic Old Fashioned since I'm pretty sure that's not the way to get the best result. The main attraction in this cocktail should be the bourbon.

Since I'm kinda lazy I usually go for the sugar syrup instead of using a sugar cube (I usually have rich syrup around - 2:1 sugar/water).

1. Pour 2oz of bourbon into a Tumbler. Add 2/3 barspoon (tops for my taste) of rich syrup. If you use simple syrup (1:1 sugar/water) go for 1 barspoon. Add 2-3 dashes of Angostura bitters.

2. Cut out a big orange zest, spray the essential oils over the cocktail (in order to do that, squeeze the zest over the cocktail holding it lengthwise, peel facing your glass). Twist the zest over the cocktail and then rub the edge of the glas with the peel. Drop the zest into the glass.

3. Now fill the glass up with ice and stir for 30-45 seconds.

4. Repeat what you did with the orange zest with a lemon zest (no need for too big a zest this time around, also no need for rubbing the edge of the glass, we don't want too much lemon aroma in this).

5. No more stirring needed, that's it. Enjoy!

rcb4d
08-09-2013, 11:10
I agree that simpler is better. Plus, I'm lazy. My Old Fashioned is some rich 2:1 simple syrup (less than a full spoon, more than half - this isn't an exact science), 2-3 dashes of bitters, 2-4 oz of bourbon or rye. sit all that before adding one big rock. I use Tovolo King ice cube trays to make 2" square cubes, so I can use more whiskey. Again, I'm lazy.

I like higher proof whiskeys for this - Weller SB blend, OGD 114, ECBP, Ritt BIB.

Angostura is the gold standard for bitters in Old Fashioneds. I also like Dead Rabbit's Orinoco bitters (made by Adam Elmegirab), Fee Brothers Whiskey Barrel Aged, and Berg & Hauck’s Jerry Thomas Cocktail Bitters.

TheNovaMan
08-09-2013, 22:17
I have about 85-90% of a 10 fl oz bottle of Angostura bitters, and I figure I probably won't run out until after I die. Maybe I'll try something different after that.

ratcheer
08-10-2013, 06:31
Thanks to @steeltownbbq's idea, last night I came up with a tequila Old Fashioned variation. A shot of Camarena, about 1/2 oz of triple sec, a couple of dashes of bitters, and ice cubes. It was good.

Tim

TunnelTiger
08-10-2013, 08:19
I like higher proof whiskeys for this - Weller SB blend, OGD 114, ECBP, Ritt BIB.

Picked up my first bottle of OGD 114 this week, in fact the first I've seen in my area so later today after trying some neet you can bet I'll be using your recipe.

It's not lazy, it's efficient.

rcb4d
08-12-2013, 06:05
I have about 85-90% of a 10 fl oz bottle of Angostura bitters, and I figure I probably won't run out until after I die. Maybe I'll try something different after that.

I don't how adventurous your palate is for cocktails, but here's a surprisingly tasty drink to use up that Angostura, the Trinidad Sour:

Trinidad Sour
1 oz Angostura bitters
1 oz orgeat
¾ oz fresh lemon juice
½ oz rye, such as Ritt BiB


Shake well with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

TheNovaMan
08-12-2013, 12:55
That sounds like hangover concentrate, but I can also see it being tasty. Would it suffer tremendously if I substituted amaretto for orgeat?


Edit: Scratch that. My eclectic mother has both orange flower water AND rose water, so I can make my own orgeat! What's a good recipe? I found these two with a quick search:
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/11/how-to-make-orgeat-recipe-almond-syrup-for-cocktails.html
http://imbibemagazine.com/Homemade-Orgeat-Recipe

tanstaafl2
08-12-2013, 13:37
That sounds like hangover concentrate, but I can also see it being tasty. Would it suffer tremendously if I substituted amaretto for orgeat?


Edit: Scratch that. My eclectic mother has both orange flower water AND rose water, so I can make my own orgeat! What's a good recipe? I found these two with a quick search:
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/11/how-to-make-orgeat-recipe-almond-syrup-for-cocktails.html
http://imbibemagazine.com/Homemade-Orgeat-Recipe

They are definitely different in both taste and texture so it might make a perfectly fine drink but it wouldn't be the same thing. I would use less amaretto (maybe half what is called for) and supplement the difference with simple syrup to taste. Most everyone, including me, tends to like Luxardo amaretto over DiSaronno.

My favorite recipe for orgeat is to go to the store and buy B.G. Reynolds orgeat (much preferred to the artificial ones like Fee Bros.). Not much of a home mixer, not that there is anything wrong with that I suppose! I would just rather use the time drinking...

TheNovaMan
08-12-2013, 13:45
In my very brief research on orgeat, I read that it was kind of expensive and one often must order it online, which is why I thought I might make some myself. I have to go on a few errands later today, so I'll keep my eyes open for it, and buy some slivered almonds if I can't find any good commercial orgeat.

tanstaafl2
08-12-2013, 13:49
In my very brief research on orgeat, I read that it was kind of expensive and one often must order it online, which is why I thought I might make some myself. I have to go on a few errands later today, so I'll keep my eyes open for it, and buy some slivered almonds if I can't find any good commercial orgeat.

B.G. Reynolds is not as cheap as Fee Brothers and others (well worth the difference in cost though in my opinion) but it is available locally in Atlanta. Can't speak to what is available in Michigan. I rarely have much luck with trying to mix my own in general, whether it be orgeat or something else, so I have pretty much quit trying!

DBM
09-07-2013, 14:51
My latest iteration.

Combine in glass:

2oz bourbon (see below for suggestions)
5 dashes of Angostura bitters
1 teaspoon of 1:1 ratio simple syrup
About 7-8 drops of marasca cherry syrup from Luxardo cherry jar - probably 1/10th teaspoon if measurable

Stir briefly

Add 2 large ice cubes
Express a large slice of orange peel, rim glass and discard peel

I find that expressing the orange peel last works best because it really showcases the scent of the orange oil suspended on top of the liquid and on the sides of the glass. I love it when the glass initially smells like a fresh orange, yet the first sip brings out all the strength and flavor of the bourbon and the orange flavor falls in line as an accompaniment.

Depending on how cold and/or strong the consumer wants their cocktail, I will adjust the ice and proof of bourbon. OWA, OGD 114 and 4RSB are great for stronger versions, while Larceny, EC12 and 4RSmB are good for a less intense drink.

Guy Debord
09-27-2013, 15:36
I heard no fruit for Old Fashioneds.

So last week I did:
2oz Maker's Mark
1/2 oz of simple syrup
5 drops of bitters
1 big rock ice cube
1 long stir for 30 seconds

Amazing!
The Old Fashioned is a good way to treat yourself.

Best,

TunnelTiger
09-27-2013, 15:40
Thanks, I substitued 4RYL for the Makers and am really enjoying it.

onemorepour
09-30-2013, 03:46
My current go to old fashioned is (which is more of a sazerac hybrid)

2oz WT101
4 drops agnostura orange bitters
1/2 tsp simple syrup (i buy a premade french mixture)
2 drops absinthe
2 large pieces chipped ice

All of the above together stirred in a lowball which has been rubbed down with a piece of flamed lemon peel (discarded)

No fruit

Happyhour24x7
10-01-2013, 04:54
I saw an interesting old fashioned presentation in a bar this weekend. They used cotton candy for the sweetener: squeezed it into a chunk sticking way up out of the glass and poured the drink over it to dissolve. Interesting, but there were more I the resting things on the menu so I did not sample. Thought it was a fancy presentation worth sharing though.