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View Full Version : Remedial Cigars 101 (aka no question to goofy)



MurphyDawg
10-24-2003, 12:01
Alright I am sure there are other people out there looking for a friendly primer in the art of cigar appreciation, I for sure would like to know. I was searching around the web before it struck me: I have a friendly, knowledgeable group I can ask already. So I am gonna fire away with all the questions I have been wanting to ask, and please feel free to pitch in and help me where you can.

1) Where did the term "herf" come from?

2)Though I am looking for a punch cutter all I have at the moment is a give-away guillotine. So my question is, where is the proper point to make the cut?? I think I may have cut my (only,heh) cigar to far in, and it may have hindered the experience.

3) Is there an alternative to a humidor for someone who may only want to have 3-4 cigars around, but doesnt smoke often enough to use them quickly/doesnt have a good smoke shop locally??

4) Are all the sizes of a line (e.g. The Punch Gran Puro Line) the same (like as in makeup) except for the size?

5) What do natural & maduro refer to, and what is the difference between them?

6) Can you suggest any good online cigar retailers, as I am in a bit of a bind, being there are no good smoke shopes within 40 miles (I have searches)??


I am sure I will think of more questions as the day progresses but this is a good start. Thank you all in advance. I am sure you will be a big help.

Tom (Cigar Newbie) C

jeff
10-24-2003, 12:56
1) Where did the term "herf" come from?




No idea, but it can be used as a noun, synonymous with the word cigar, or as a verb, usually to describe some cigar get-together.



2)Though I am looking for a punch cutter all I have at the moment is a give-away guillotine. So my question is, where is the proper point to make the cut?? I think I may have cut my (only,heh) cigar to far in, and it may have hindered the experience.





Cut it just above the end of the cap, about 1/8" from the end of the cigar, to keep the wrapper from unwinding on you. I use a punch cutter most of the time as it is almost fool-proof.



) Is there an alternative to a humidor for someone who may only want to have 3-4 cigars around, but doesnt smoke often enough to use them quickly/doesnt have a good smoke shop locally??





Well, humidors come in all shapes and sizes, even for 10 or fewer cigars. That said, you can use something as simple as a piece of tupperware with a humidifier inside. Be sure to open it every week or so to allow the air to exchange. This helps to prevent mold.



4) Are all the sizes of a line (e.g. The Punch Gran Puro Line) the same (like as in makeup) except for the size?





For the most part yes, but some manufacturers will play with the blends of tobacco slightly for different sizes of the same cigar line.



5) What do natural & maduro refer to, and what is the difference between them?



Natural and Maduro are words that describe the style of wrapper your cigar has. In general, natural wrappers are a light to medium brown color, while maduros are more of a dark-chocolate color. This is by no means universal, but generally your maduros will be the heavier, more full-bodied smokes.



6) Can you suggest any good online cigar retailers, as I am in a bit of a bind, being there are no good smoke shopes within 40 miles (I have searches)??




Try the following:

www.cigar.com (http://www.cigar.com)
www.cigarsinternational.com (http://www.cigarsinternational.com)
www.thompsonscigars.com (http://www.thompsonscigars.com)
www.cigarbid.com (http://www.cigarbid.com) - A cigar auction site. Sometimes you can pick up great deals on boxes and 5-packs. Beware, as it is quite addictive and you could soon end up with more cigars than you have room to keep. Time to build a coolerdor http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Hope that helps some.

bluesbassdad
10-24-2003, 13:52
1) Where did the term "herf" come from?






No idea, but it can be used as a noun, synonymous with the word cigar, or as a verb, usually to describe some cigar get-together.




I thought I'd be a wise-ass and come up with the definitive answer via a Google search. Little did I know...

I tried searching on "cigar herf origin". The first hit (http://www.uk-cigars.co.uk/herfs/herf1.htm) (of 33) convinced me that I was in over my head. (Esp., see ref. to "Herf Alpert and the Tijuana Brass".)

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

MurphyDawg
10-24-2003, 14:54
Natural and Maduro are words that describe the style of wrapper your cigar has.



Can one assume that this applies to the sun-grown and sumatran designations as well?

TomC

jeff
10-24-2003, 15:41
Not really, as I believe you can make any wrapper into a maduro, you just have to ferment it longer. I'll look this up in a couple cigar books I have and post more info.

MurphyDawg
10-24-2003, 16:09
Okay good deal. It feels like the first day on the bourbon forum all over again:


<font color="orange"> What does it all mean?!?!? </font>



LOL
TomC

MurphyDawg
10-24-2003, 16:14
Beware, as it is quite addictive and you could soon end up with more cigars than you have room to keep. Time to build a coolerdor




The one thing that I know will help keep the cigar spending for sure in check is that a large part of my leisure budget is already devoted to something else I am enthusiastic about (hmmmm. . . I wonder that THAT is. . .), and with upcoming releases of Stagg, ER17 (yay there will be more, and fall Bday bourbon (not to mention eventually FR SB) I dont see spending on that front curtailing anytime soon. . . .


Tom (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif$$$ http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif) C

MurphyDawg
10-27-2003, 15:43
Okay a couple more questions I thought of:

1) What should I look for not make sure the cigar I want is in the proper condition at the retail outlet?? I'd rather not pay for duds.


2) Althought I seemed to do alright in my limited experience, is there a "proper" way to smoke a cigar, to get the most of the experience?


Thanx kindly for the knowledge,
TomC

doubleblank
10-29-2003, 08:12
Hello MD.....go to the cigarafficionado website. They have lots of info on cigars, ie ratings, etc that I have found to be very informative. This past summer they ran a series of acticles called "Cigars 101". Go on their site and do a search for Cigars 101. It answers questions about terminology, how to properly light a cigar, etc. Better yet, come out to Vegas for this years annual cigar show sponsered by Cigar Afficionado magazine. They give out lots of great cigars and pour great whisky (ey). Hope this helps.

Doubleblank

bandit
10-30-2003, 20:09
Okay a couple more questions I thought of:

1) What should I look for not make sure the cigar I want is in the proper condition at the retail outlet?? I'd rather not pay for duds.




That's a tough one. I would suggest find a reputable dealer and stick with him. Its really about how the cigars have been stored. Since the cigar craze has died down, it seems more likely to run into a retailer who doesn't care well for the cigars. They aren't selling as many, so many cigars are still around from the mid-90's -- not a problem unless improperly stored.

Squeezing cigars don't tell you much, (unless they "crunch"!) But at minimum they should look good without any blue or green moldy stuff. Beyond that, you've got to trust your tobacconist.

I bought at a well known place recently (not my regular vendor) that was grossly over-humidified. Hard to light and never did get it to burn well. And they even had a wooden indian outside. Thems the breaks.

The moral: Avoid dime-stores and many liquor stores. Look for a real smoke-shop, preferably one that was in business before the fad. Failing that, there are several good online retailers -- my favorite is two guys smokeshop.

www.2guyssmokeshop.com (http://www.2guyssmokeshop.com)

I'm sure others will have recommendations.

I hope this helps.

-AJ

MurphyDawg
10-31-2003, 00:37
Hey man thanx for the heads up! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/bandit.gif

TomC

MurphyDawg
11-07-2003, 00:35
1)I noticed that "perfecto" cigars (like Hemingways) are closed at both ends. are you supposed to trim both ends before lighting or leave the head as is?

2)I am new to this, so I ask, what are they basic varieties I should try (for example in Bourbon its good to try a wheater if possible and a rye from each distillery: Beam, Brown Forman, HH, BT, Four Roses, Wild Turkey etc etc)? I figure there is an equivalent in Cigars, I am just not sure what it is. I figure this could serve as a jumping off point for further explorations.

3) What are the cat &amp; dog brands (pretending to be fancy) I should avoid? I have a rather limited cigar budget and really dont want to be duped into inferior product. . .


Thanx yet again,
TomC

jeff
11-07-2003, 07:50
Tom,

When lighting a perfecto, simply light the foot, no trimming needed. They are called perfectos because they light perfectly every time. This has been my experience as well. I'll try to help you on brands in another post when I have more time to think about it. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/bandit.gif

doubleblank
11-07-2003, 08:52
Now that the cigar shortage is largely over, most of the "cats and dogs" have disappeared or are in the "close out" bin. Your idea of trying several cigars from each important producer is a good one. I'd include each of the following in my comparison list. Some are from the Domincan Republic (known for milder cigars) and some from Nicaragua and Honduras (known for fuller bodied smokes).

A. Fuente - makes mild to bold cigars
H. Upmann - mostly medium bodied
Macanudo - mild to medium
Padron - stronger smokes...be sure and splurge for a "1964 Aniversary"
Romeo y Julieta - get a regular and one of their Vintage line
Hoyo de Monterey - get a regular and an Excalibur

This would give you a nice mix of flavor profiles from which you could determine your own likes and dislikes. Personally, when I want a milder smoke, its a Romeo y Julietta Vintage V....for a stronger smoke, its the Padron 1964 Aniversary. Larger cigars produce a cooler, more flavorful smoke. I like coronas and larger sizes.

I'm going out to watch the pros play today at the Tour Chanpionship here in Houston. After talking cigars....I'll have to stop on the way there and pick up a smoke.

DoubleBlank

MurphyDawg
11-07-2003, 11:14
Much Obliged. I didnt want to ask for a suggestions outright (you know, "I am a newbie, what should I try. . ." type post) but I know that a good selection would make for a nice primer so I would understand wht I am looking for at least.


TomC

MurphyDawg
11-08-2003, 01:50
Alright one more trimming question before I drop THAT subject. Where do you trim a torpedo? If you were to trim it where the cigar starts to straighten out, you would lose 1/2 your herf! I figure about 1/2 way up the incline, but would someone clarify!


TomC

Jal
11-08-2003, 07:41
On torpedo's (pyramids, perfectos, etc.) I usually sacrifice about 1/4" - 1/2" for my cut. Be aware that, if your final opening is to small, tar will quickly collect there and alter the flavor. I know some guys who will recut their cigar about half-way through just to remove the build up.

jeff
11-08-2003, 08:20
Tom, I cut torpedos about 1/8 to 1/4" from the point. It is a smaller opening, but if it is a decent cigar you shouldn't notice and draw problems (backs? http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif get it...draw-backs http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/falling.gif)

Vinnie
11-09-2003, 20:57
I agree with jeff 1/8 to 1/4 inch. I haven't found a torpedo that i didn't enjoy. I believe if a company decides to go through the trouble of making this type of cigar they usually do it right. With this size cutting you should have no problem with draw, but hell if you want more flow cut it bigger http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif Anyway just enjoy it. That is the whole point isn't it?

longash4me
11-12-2003, 11:40
Cigarbid is a very good source for anyone that wants to buy a hand full of domestic cigars. They are usually in good shape and a good variety is always available. They offer samplers that have a nice mix of different cigars, so you can discover what you like without breaking your Bourbon bank. If you are curious about a certain brand you can always ask the experienced folks you trust here before you buy. There are methods to truely enhancing the pleasure of smoking a good cigar but it's really all about what YOU enjoy. I can tell you without doubt that a great Bourbon and a great cigar are near flavor/sensory perfection for a member of the human species. I will be glad to help anyone with cigars and I hope you can do the same for me with Bourbon. It would be my pleasure.

MurphyDawg
11-19-2003, 16:24
I was gonna smoke a CAO gold robusto today but I screwed up the cut and it unraveled a little bit at the end. Is this going to affect the enjoyment of the smoke terribly?? My replacement smoke was such a dog rocket that I didnt even get halfway through it, so if the CAO wont suck, I may have it yet today.

TomC

B_Dub___Cigar_Ambassador
11-19-2003, 17:19
Sometimes you can reaffix the unraveling wrapper.

Lick the underside of the wrapper near the cap where it is beginning to unravel. Use your finger to "paste" it back on. After lighting the foot, try to keep the head of the cigar wet with your lips throughout the smoke. With any luck, the wrapper will stay in place.

On the other hand, if the wrapper begins to unravel near the foot, it's a whole different ballgame. You don't want to be trying to lick something that is on fire, heheheh. If the foot comes undone, just keep smoking if that's possible. Oftentimes, you will smoke through it with very little consequence. But if it ends up looking like a bomb exploded in the end of your cigar, you might want to chuck it and get another.

Hope this helps.

B_Dub___Cigar_Ambassador
11-19-2003, 17:27
1)I noticed that "perfecto" cigars (like Hemingways) are closed at both ends. are you supposed to trim both ends before lighting or leave the head as is?




I just want to clarify your terminology a little bit. The "head" is near the "cap" at the top, where it goes into your mouth. The "foot" is near the bottom, where you light the cigar.

Having said that, I will reply to your question.

You would clip the cap of a perfecto or figurado just like any other cigar. But clipping the closed foot is not necessary. In fact, you don't want to clip off all that yummy excess premium wrapper tobacco at the end anyway... it really starts the cigar off on a good note! Just put it to a flame, and away you go!

MurphyDawg
11-19-2003, 17:27
Yep it does, I just may fire it up tonight after all!




TomC

MurphyDawg
11-19-2003, 17:35
Yep, not only did that Hemingway Signature I bought taste great, but it was a cinch to light. I wondr why there arent more perfectos on the market (I did notice the Partgas Series S has a perfecto in its line)?

TomC

B_Dub___Cigar_Ambassador
11-19-2003, 18:31
2) Althought I seemed to do alright in my limited experience, is there a "proper" way to smoke a cigar, to get the most of the experience?



There are certain things that you want to do properly, to maximize your enjoyment while smoking a cigar. Most cigar enthusiasts have a fairly routine ritual that they go through when preparing to smoke a cigar.

1. Pick out the cigar(s).

This is key. If you are going for a morning smoke, select a milder cigar. Medium for afternoon, and strong for evening/after-dinner. If you plan on smoking more than one cigar, smoke the milder one first and the stronger one next. Otherwise, your strong cigar will overpower your ability to appreciate successive cigars. Make sense?

2. Pour yourself a nice drink.

Geeee, I wonder what I could drink with a cigar??? LOL.
Coffee, whiskey, rum, tequila, martinis, water and cranberry juice all make wonderful cigar complements. You want something that will cleanse your palate between puffs, and that won't hinder your sensitivity to the subtle flavors and delicate aromas of your fine cigar. Time of day, and cigar selection will affect your choice of beverage. Personally, I go for coffee in the morning, cranberry juice or water in the afternoon and whiskey in the evening.

3. Find a good location.

Sound silly? Wind can ruin the experience. That's why I only take dog-rockets out on the golf course. With all the wind, I have to draw harder and more often just to keep the cigar lit, and it tends to scorch the tobacco which makes for a bad taste. Also, the wind immediately eliminates your ability to smell the aroma of your fine cigar smoke. So why smoke it at all?

I prefer to smoke in areas protected from wind, and where I can relax in style. My front porch forms a natural haven from the wind and I have a comfy padded chair next to a table for my drink and a book or magazine. The garage is another nice place, especially in the winter. On a calm day, I might head out with a chair and a beer on the driveway. I have met most of my neighbors this way!

4. Remove the cellophane.

Here is where the road forks. After taking off the plastic, what do you do with the band? Some people leave it on, some folks take it off. Leaving it on gives you a nice place to hold the cigar, and marks the approximate point at which to stop smoking the cigar. Removing it allows you to keep the ornate band to remember your cigar. If you remove the band, there is a chance that you will tear the expensive wrapper tobacco. But with time, you can get very good at removing your bands safely. (There is actually a technique I use, since I remove the bands on every cigar I smoke. But I will not go into it here.)

5. Moisten the top half inch of the cigar in your mouth.

This will help make the cap more pliant just before cutting. I am not talking about sopping wet here, folks. Just enough to moisten the head of the cigar. This will minimize the chance that the wrapper will split or start to unravel while you clip off the cap. After rolling the end of the cigar in your mouth, take it out and wait a couple seconds.

6. Clip the cap.

A number of different cigar cutter types are available; including scissors, bullet punch, and guillotine blades, among others. I have found that a sharp, stainless steel, double-bladed guillotine cutter works the best. I have a beautiful $15.00 guillotine cutter which works as well today as the day I bought it. The cut is quick, clean and easy.

Generally, you want to cut as little of the cap as possible, while opening up most of the end of the cigar. About 1/8th of an inch of the cap should be remaining after you clip the cigar. This remaining portion of the cap is what holds the wrapper in place so that it doesn't start to unravel. Torpedo or Chisel shaped cigars require a little bit different approach, but this method will work for most of the cigars that you'll come in contact with.

After clipping the cap, wipe off any loose pieces of tobacco from the head and test the draw of the cigar. Air should move fairly easily through the barrel. If not, you may need to clip off more of the end or let it dry out a little bit.

7. Toast the foot.

Some people swear by expensive cedar matches. Personally, my torch lighter does a beautiful job and does not affect the taste of the cigar in any way. Colibri makes the best torch lighters. My $35.00 Colibri is near the bottom of their line, but it works great! And for those that don't know, a "torch" lighter is one where the butane is shot quickly from the lighter. The flame is very faint or invisible, but extremely hot and windproof.

To toast the foot, ignite your torch and apply the flame to the end of your cigar. Get the entire foot to glow before putting it in your mouth. This gives the cigar a nice start, and helps to ensure an even burn during your entire smoke.

Next, put the cigar in your mouth and take a few puffs while still applying the torch flame to the foot. You should get a bountiful supply of smoke with just a puff or two.

8. Enjoy!

Now that your cigar is properly lit, you are off to the races. Take a shorter puff or two, and then take a good pull of smoke into your mouth. Hold it there for about 5 seconds, and then open your mouth. Let the smoke drift gently out of your mouth. As it passes around your nose, you can pull in just a little bit to savor the aroma's many nuances.

Just be careful. This is pure, unfiltered tobacco smoke. Ideally, you don't want to inhale the smoke into your lungs at all. Smoke a cigar like a cigarette, and you'll understand why. When pulling a little bit of the smoke into your nostrils, do it just enough to smell the aroma and then expel it. Inevitably, some of it will drift down to your upper respiratory system. Just try not to inhale too much of it.

9. Build your ash.

I try to let my ash get to about an inch before attempting to knock it into the ashtray. The ash will contribute to an even burn, and will even affect the flavor of your cigar. You can often spot a cigar novice continually forcing the ash from the end of his cigar.

Each ring on the ash represents a puff on the cigar. Someone with a heavier draw, will have wider rings on the ash. Try to take another puff or two after knocking off the ash, to get a new ash going. Again, this will help maintain an even burn.

10. Let it die.

At the end of your cigar, or when you've had enough, simply place the butt into the ashtray and let it die on its own. Unlike a cigarette, which has tons of tar added to the mix, a cigar is 100% premium tobacco. Without puffing on it every couple of minutes, it will go out on its own. Crushing a cigar out will often result in a bad smell, like stale smoke. This is another telltale sign of a novice cigar smoker.

**********************************************

Sorry for the length, but I thought it was important to give the Members of this forum enough information to properly enjoy an expensive cigar. Anything less is kinda like mixing your Wild Turkey Kentucky Spirit with your 7Up.

MurphyDawg
11-19-2003, 18:50
Well Put. I bet you that if I woulda moistened a little before cuttin that CAO, it would have been fine.

TomC

B_Dub___Cigar_Ambassador
11-19-2003, 23:26
1) Where did the term "herf" come from?




I sure don't know where the term came from, but I have never seen it used (except on this forum) as another term for "cigar."

I always hear and read it used as: a gathering of people for the purpose of enjoying cigars.

B_Dub___Cigar_Ambassador
11-19-2003, 23:35
On torpedo's (pyramids, perfectos, etc.) I usually sacrifice about 1/4" - 1/2" for my cut. Be aware that, if your final opening is to small, tar will quickly collect there and alter the flavor. I know some guys who will recut their cigar about half-way through just to remove the build up.




Jal is right on. The tapered end of the torpedo is designed to magnify the strength of the smoke as it exits the cigar. This happens as the essential resins collect on the tobacco further up the barrel. Very often, the tar will indeed collect on the cut, blocking the flow of air out of the cigar.

I will usually trim a tiny bit off the end for starters. Then as the draw tightens, I cut another 1/16th". And so on. When smoking torpedos, I just go into it expecting to make two-to-four cuts along the way.

B_Dub___Cigar_Ambassador
11-19-2003, 23:46
Yep, not only did that Hemingway Signature I bought taste great, but it was a cinch to light. I wondr why there arent more perfectos on the market (I did notice the Partgas Series S has a perfecto in its line)?

TomC



The Partagas Serie S line is comprised entirely of figurados, or "shaped" cigars. And yes, one of them is a perfecto. But they are all curiously shaped.

Your question is an interesting one, because there is some history to be revealed. You see, in yesteryear, just about ALL cigars were figurados. The "parejo," or "straight-sided," cigar is a relatively modern phenomenon. Perfectos were the norm in years gone by.

MurphyDawg
11-19-2003, 23:48
I know Jeff does, and I am pretty sure I had heard herf used that way before, although I can't seem to remember where.

TomC

MurphyDawg
11-19-2003, 23:50
It seems to my that it would only make sense, especially in the case of perfectos, as they are easier to smoke.

TomC

jeff
11-20-2003, 06:01
There have been a couple of occasions when I have completely removed the wrapper and smoked the cigar with only the binder. Not ideal, and pretty ugly to boot, but it was a decent smoke. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/bandit.gif

jeff
11-20-2003, 06:04
Tom,

Perfectos are expensive to manufacter, as they take a very experienced, and higher paid, cigar roller to produce. And the number of perfectos that can be produced in a day is much smaller than if the same roller were rolling say coronas. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/bandit.gif

MurphyDawg
11-20-2003, 10:33
Well its nice to know that at least the extra price incurred by me is at least partially justified. Why do you think it is that much harder to make them?

TomC

jeff
11-20-2003, 11:01
I don't know, as I have never rolled a cigar, but my understanding is that new cigar rollers train for long periods of time before they are ever put into production and then only on the roll that they have learned. By the time you are rolling perfectos you probably have mastered most of the other cigar types for your company. I have read somewhere that rollers rolling perfectos probably have 10+ years of experience at this point. It is a true art form.

jeff
11-20-2003, 11:08
Very nice post! I will only part ways with you on the moistening part, as every time I try it I seem to get an uneaven and burred cut. Almost like the blade is tearing the wrapper instead of cutting it cleanly.

MurphyDawg
11-20-2003, 11:09
Ah, a shortage of a companies most important asset, properly trained people.


TomC

B_Dub___Cigar_Ambassador
11-20-2003, 16:39
Very nice post! I will only part ways with you on the moistening part, as every time I try it I seem to get an uneaven and burred cut. Almost like the blade is tearing the wrapper instead of cutting it cleanly.




What you need is a SHARPER cutter. If you have a razor-sharp cutter, it will be problem.

ratcheer
11-21-2003, 19:22
That all sounds wonderful! I wish I had had something like that to help me when I was smoking. I was enjoying it even though I haven't smoked in about 5 years.

Thanks, Tim

Nightcap
12-09-2003, 18:23
... And they even had a wooden indian outside.



So, what's up with the wooden Indian thing? My local tobacconist has one too.

Nightcap
12-10-2003, 21:43
I worked one season as a youngster at a TinderBox. Got myself the beginnings of an education about tobacco there.

Simple advice for those new to cigars: relax, go slow. Remember, you are trying to taste the smoke, not the cigar. The best advice given to me by the veterans was to "sip" the smoke from the cigar. Appropriate advice, I'd say, for bourbon enthusiasts. You want to burn tobacco as slowly as you can without allowing it to go out. You are controlling the rate of combustion with air flow. The slower/cooler you burn it, the less acrid and the more open and accessible the flavor is. You don't need billows of smoke to enjoy the flavor of fine tobacco.

I'm a pipe smoker, but all this talk of stogies has me jonesing for one. I'm gonna pick one up for Friday night.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Charter13
03-06-2005, 16:30
Here is the origin of the word "herf"

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/alt....f&hl=en&rnum=10 (http://groups-beta.google.com/group/alt.smokers.cigars/msg/6392cbcf88ad07f4?q=origin+of+the+word+herf&hl=en&rnum=10)

Please do not order cigars from Thompson cigars. If you want to order cigars from reputable sources, try:
www.jrcigars.com (http://www.jrcigars.com)
www.holts.com (http://www.holts.com)

You will find the best prices on run-of-the-mill cigars here and MSRP on hard-to-finds like Fuente.

jbutler
03-06-2005, 18:30
Please do not order cigars from Thompson cigars. If you want to order cigars from reputable sources



The way this is worded, it almost sounds like a libelous plug for someone's competing online business. Of course, I may simply misunderstand your intent. Would you care to tell us why we shouldn't do business with Thompson?

gr8erdane
03-06-2005, 18:48
It could be for several reasons, but the greatest being they are overpriced on their premiums. I just finished a relationship with them and will never order from them again even though I have a gift certificate that would pay the biggest part of their charge for a box of my favorites. I made the mistake of joining their "250 Club" where after buying a total of 250 cigars you get 10% of your purchases rebated in store credits. After reaching and exceeding the 250, and never getting any notification of it, I called and asked them if I had made it and they affirmed. I asked where my credit was and they assured me it had been mailed. I didn't have it so I asked if they would just send me a box of my choice, subtract the amount from it and charge my credit card for the balance as it was a super premium brand I was requesting. I received the cigars a week or so later and found that the entire amount had been charged to me with no mention of the credit. When I called them, I asked that they credit it directly to my account and they said they had to send me my certificate to use on a future purchase. Needless to say, I am no longer a member of the "250 Club" and the certificate is in my filing cabinet in the "what was I thinking" file.

As for the plugs on cigar sites, there are tons out there that offer better prices and better customer service but I won't volunteer any of them as everyone seems to have their own favorites. I would respond to a PM though if someone wanted my opinion of a good site.

jbutler
03-06-2005, 18:59
I have no problem with a links to online shopping Dane, provided they aren't posted by the proprietor. I just want to know why Charter doesn't care for Thompson. If his/her reasons are similar to yours, well then there it is.

If as a member you know of a reputable place of business with good prices, than share by all means.

Charter13
03-06-2005, 19:01
Sorry, not my intention. Thompson's is like the California retailers that sell Stagg for $150 a bottle. They are opportunistic and generally scorned within the cigar community. The quality of their professed "premium" smokes is oft lackluster and their cigars are stored in improper conditions. Often the consumer will receive dried out smokes.

I have no stake in any cigar business whatsoever. I am just a fan. The info I have presented has been garnished from several years of cigar BBS. Holts and JR Cigars are generally have excellent customer service, quality product and good storage facilities. Their reputation in the cigar community is untarnished.

jbutler
03-06-2005, 19:05
Well there it is! All I could ask for, and then some.

Carry on. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif

Charter13
03-06-2005, 19:13
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

sevenmag
09-14-2005, 06:52
1) Where did the term "herf" come from? <font color="red"> Not sure on that one, it's been debated over and over and I can't decide on which answer I like.</font>

2)Though I am looking for a punch cutter all I have at the moment is a give-away guillotine. So my question is, where is the proper point to make the cut?? I think I may have cut my (only,heh) cigar to far in, and it may have hindered the experience.

<font color="red"> On a cigar you have a head and a foot. The foot being the lit end and the head being the banded end. You want to cut just at the point where the head is rounded into the side of the cigar. A sure fire way to get a good cut every time until you find the right spot is to lay your cutter flat on the table, put the cigar in the cutter pressed firmly against the table and cut. It works great if you're using a standard guillotine cutter. </font>

3) Is there an alternative to a humidor for someone who may only want to have 3-4 cigars around, but doesn't smoke often enough to use them quickly/doesnt have a good smoke shop locally?? <font color="red"> Yes. Rubbermaid, or Tupperware is the way to go. A small one will keep cigars in great shape for as long you want to keep them. An old aspirin bottle or film canister with a small piece of damp sponge makes a decent humidifier, but be careful not to over do it with the sponge. For long term aging involving a few or many boxes, an igloo cooler or any some other brand. At one point I had three 60 qt. coolers full and they worked very well for me. </font>

4) Are all the sizes of a line (e.g. The Punch Gran Puro Line) the same (like as in makeup) except for the size?

<font color="red"> They try to keep every vitola in a line as close to each other as possible. Given that the smaller sizes have much less filler, it's difficult when you're dealing with a hand rolled product. For the most part, every line in every brand has one size that stands out from the rest. Hoyo de Monterrey has the Rothschild, Saint Louis Rey has the petite corona, just to name a couple.</font>

5) What do natural & maduro refer to, and what is the difference between them?

<font color="red"> A maduro is a wrapper that's fermented. Bundles of them are wet, put in crates and allowed to ferment, then the crate is emptied and the contents are rotated to get the top leaves on the bottom and the bottom ones moved to the top, and that's repeated until the whole lot has been in every level of the crate. That gives them a good uniform color for the batch. The process also turns them dark and brings out the sweetness of the leaf. The only drawback is that it takes a fairly thick durable strain of tobacco to stand up to all that handling, so they are at times prone to burn problems. A natural leaf is not put through all this, also there are many more options available to the manufacturer. Cameroon, Ecuadorian sungrown, Connecticut Shade, Corojo, Criollo and some indonesion as well.</font>

6) Can you suggest any good online cigar retailers, as I am in a bit of a bind, being there are no good smoke shopes within 40 miles (I have searches)??

<font color="red">www.jrcigars.com, Smoke all, mdcigars.com and Mr. Bundles.com. These are my favorites Jr. and Mr. Bundles in particular. Cigarbid.com can be fun but be careful http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif </font>



I am sure I will think of more questions as the day progresses but this is a good start. Thank you all in advance. I am sure you will be a big help.


I just joined, and if all this has already been answered, I'm sorry. But I hope it helps.

jeff
12-31-2009, 13:39
:bandit:Smoke 'em if ya got 'em:bandit:

smokinjoe
12-31-2009, 15:08
Yessir! I'll be ringing in 2010 with an AF Hemingway tonight! Looking forward to it!
Cheers!

foxflyer5
05-21-2010, 12:12
im in the market for a small humidor, something holding less than 25 cigars would be fine. priced at less than $50 would be ideal. can you find something decent in the range? if so, does anyone have a brand or retailer they recommend?

ggilbertva
05-21-2010, 20:21
im in the market for a small humidor, something holding less than 25 cigars would be fine. priced at less than $50 would be ideal. can you find something decent in the range? if so, does anyone have a brand or retailer they recommend?

If you're looking online, check out JR Cigars or Cigars International.

foxflyer5
05-24-2010, 12:54
thanks, ive been doing some research online, but im heading to NC in a couple weeks, so i hope to make a stop at one of the JR Cigars outlets.

ratcheer
05-25-2010, 06:38
thanks, ive been doing some research online, but im heading to NC in a couple weeks, so i hope to make a stop at one of the JR Cigars outlets.

I went to the one in Statesville a couple of years ago. What a strange place. Most of the store is like the biggest junk emporium you could imagine. But the cigar shop is in an enclosed section of one end of the store and it is very nice. They have hundreds of selections plus almost everything else cigar-related.

Tim

fricky
05-25-2010, 08:48
I have been to the one in Burlington, NC and in addition to a great selection of cigars, they have a great lounge where you can smoke cigars, drink excellent complimentary coffee, and meet interesting like-minded people.

Doggerlander
06-12-2010, 09:08
3) Is there an alternative to a humidor for someone who may only want to have 3-4 cigars around, but doesnt smoke often enough to use them quickly/doesnt have a good smoke shop locally??

Ziploc bags work. Be careful not to get any water on the cigars. You might be tempted to sprinkle some water in the bag to keep the cigars moist if they are in cellophane, but that risks mold.


4) Are all the sizes of a line (e.g. The Punch Gran Puro Line) the same (like as in makeup) except for the size?

Some lines have a mixed-filler cheap cigar where they make use of leftover cuttings. They are usually a lot cheaper, but use the same tobacco as the long-filler cigars. Mixed-filler probably smokes faster than long.


6) Can you suggest any good online cigar retailers, as I am in a bit of a bind, being there are no good smoke shopes within 40 miles (I have searches)??

I've used JR Cigar for over 25 years, maybe 30 (mail order before the Internet). When they don't have it, I go to Famous Smoke Shop (http://www.famous-smoke.com). JR's catalog write-ups are funny and educational. I've had pretty good luck with their bundles and their store brands or exclusive packages, but sometimes I've been disappointed (e.g., Flor de Baloney). JR Dutch Auctions are also addictive and I have run out of storage space for cigars as well as bourbon.

bourboNcigars
05-26-2014, 18:09
I always go to cigar.com , cigarsinternational.com , and cigarbid.com

Clavius
08-18-2014, 18:27
So I purchased a new humidor that will be here in a few days (my old one was garbage). I plan on seasoning it with two Boveda 84% packets (which takes 14 days).

Problem is, I also just purchased a box of Oliva Serie V thanks to a deal that was too good to pass up. I take it that this box of cigars will be sealed in plastic somehow. If so, how long will the sticks inside be OK?

Thanks.

Paddy
08-18-2014, 18:39
You should be fine for a couple of weeks. If you get nervous, you can always seal them in Tupperware.

Tupperware can be as effective as any humidor, as long as you are able to check the humidity level. I know several people who only have ditched their humi's in favor or Tupperware containers, while maintaining the humidity level with cat litter.

The same applies to Ziplock storage bags, but obviously they do offer less protection for the sticks you are storing when transporting.

Clavius
08-18-2014, 18:46
You should be fine for a couple of weeks. If you get nervous, you can always seal them in Tupperware.

Tupperware can be as effective as any humidor, as long as you are able to check the humidity level. I know several people who only have ditched their humi's in favor or Tupperware containers, while maintaining the humidity level with cat litter.

The same applies to Ziplock storage bags, but obviously they do offer less protection for the sticks you are storing when transporting.
Paddy, many thanks!

Harry in WashDC
08-18-2014, 19:35
FWIW, I'm an Igloodor fan. Those Igloo coolers that hold a 6-pack or a 12-pack of beer work fine. I invested in a pint of propylene glycol (about $7-8 from my CVS Pharmacy) which is probably more than I'd use in 20 years, a soap dish like we used at camp (plastic hinged lid), and a block of oasis (the green flower stuff you stick flower stems in) stolen from my wife's flower stuff. Cut the oasis to fit the soap dish, soak it with PG, add a teeny bit of water (like maybe a dozen drops), and close everything. I crack the lid maybe once a month for a few minutes to let extra moisture out. In 30 years, I've only had a problem when I quit smoking for six months (several times, one being right now), and forgot to burp the box. They got a little dry - not too much but some.

They are square, easy to clean, stack, and move. And hide. I also keep those extra Spanish cedar sheets found in, say, Buteras or AVOs (AVO 2s being my huckleberry), and stick them in the coolers. Don't know that they help much but they don't hurt.