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bourbonmed
03-21-2004, 07:52
Conecuh Ridge Whiskey is making big news in the state of Alabama. They want to make it the official state whiskey, but Governor says no.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/soapbox.gif

http://www.usatoday.com/news/offbeat/2004-03-19-whiskey_x.htm

Omar

cowdery
03-21-2004, 15:25
That's funny. Am I correct in remembering that this product is actually made in Kentucky?

Paradox
03-21-2004, 15:36
That's funny. Am I correct in remembering that this product is actually made in Kentucky?



Yep you're right Chuck. On the left side of the bottle it says "Handcrafted in Kentucky in small batches" and on the right it says "Bottled by Conecuh Ridge Distillery, Bardstown KY"

TNbourbon
03-21-2004, 19:15
Even if it were made in Alabama, I'm afraid I'd have to side with the Guv on this one. What happens if the label goes belly-up. Or, worse yet, is bought by some Hong Kong outfit who makes it export-only. Or, somebody starts making Old Coon Dog or some other locally-monikered brand.

bourbonmed
03-22-2004, 12:13
Tim, good point. Here is an editorial that ran in an Alabama paper over the weekend.

http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/NEWS/StoryOpinionedbooze320w.htm

Omar

cornsqueezins
03-23-2004, 08:59
I think Kenny May has been looking at potential distillery sites in Alabama so that, ultimately, he can make his whiskey within the state.

Concerning Riley's veto, I agree with those who support it. But it would be sort of funny to see a bottle of Conecuh Ridge on the Great Seal of Alabama... http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/skep.gif

cowdery
03-23-2004, 10:25
The main thing is the publicity and in that regard, everyone played their part perfectly. The fact that it looks like a controversey is what got it in the papers. Well done, everyone. I'll bet he got a very nice sales bounce out of this. Exactly what you need at this stage in a product's development is sampling and this is just the thing to generate it.

This guy is good at generating publicity. I think the original stories about it were in the Wall Street Journal. At that time he did say he intended to make it in Alabama eventually.

Has anyone had the stuff? How is it?

tdelling
03-23-2004, 10:32
> Has anyone had the stuff? How is it?

I love it!
Check out my tasting notes (and the discussion that follows):

http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthreads/showthreaded.php?Cat=&Board=General&Number=14806

Barrel_Proof
03-23-2004, 10:35
Has anyone had the stuff? How is it?


I'm heeding the advice of Thumper's father: <font color="brown">If you can't say something nice, don't say nothing at all. </font>

cowdery
03-23-2004, 11:26
Interesting. Thanks for the link. I thought there had been a thread about it before.

How would you say it compares to an American blended whiskey, such as Seagram's Seven Crown or Kessler's? That sort of sounds like what you're describing.

Gillman
03-23-2004, 13:27
I don't agree with the producer's statement that the product is made from a "bourbon mash" when a defining element of bourbon is aging in new charred barrels. The strong marketing focus that has been mentioned seems evident here no less..

The concept of aging a low proof corn-based distillate (that's what bourbon mash must mean in this context) in used barrels is an interesting one. It is one up on blended whiskey because the neutral spirit component of the latter has no counterpart, I presume, in this product. It sounds like they have taken an approach similar to the recent Michter's unblended whiskey and the two would make an interesting comparison.

If it is true that parochial lobbying interests dictated the exclusive use of new cooperage for aging of bourbon - not quality considerations per se - the appearance of these new whiskeys that are similar to bourbon except not aged in new charred wood is a chance to see if there really can be a quality product in this category. But I think that back in '38 it was probably understood that aging in new charred barrels lent the signature note to American straight whiskey derived from corn. And therefore, while these alternative whiskey products may be good, their like were probably never regarded traditionally as a prime example of U.S. aged whiskey made mostly from corn and associated in particular with Kentucky.

Gary

Paradox
03-23-2004, 13:37
How would you say it compares to an American blended whiskey, such as Seagram's Seven Crown or Kessler's? That sort of sounds like what you're describing.



In this post (http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthreads/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Number=27240&amp;page=0&amp;view=col lapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=186&amp;vc=1), I compared it to Michter's Unblended American Whiskey Chuck, and I found it to be VERY similar... Though the Conecuh Ridge, in my opinion, was a bit better...

tdelling
03-23-2004, 13:39
I have to confess that I have practically no experience with
Seven Crown or other blended American whiskies, so I can't
really compare them to Conecuh Ridge. Perhaps I'll pick up
a few in the next couple of weeks to add to my, ummm...
"reference library".

Oh, and add them to my "bourbon curriculum"... which probably
needs updating anyhow:

http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthreads/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=General&amp;Number=8611

Tim Dellinger

cowdery
03-23-2004, 14:54
I don't think there is anything wrong with the statement that Conecuh is made from a "bourbon mash," a term which has a very specific meaning. A bourbon mash is a mixture of grains including corn and malt, and either wheat or rye (or, conceivably, both), with corn being at least 51 percent. When that combination of grains is mixed with water and cooked, you have "bourbon mash." The barrel isn't implicated at the mashing stage.

Gillman
03-23-2004, 16:00
I had the impression - this can only be subjective - that the producer was trying to link this product to a bourbon tradition.

Gary

ratcheer
03-27-2004, 11:26
I may have missed it in this thread, but my memory of the earlier Conecuh Ridge publicity is that May is attempting to reproduce the taste experience of "good" homemade whiskey. That is to say, not what moonshiners made to sell, but what small scale rural distillers made for themselves and their close friends. I think he was referring back to the post-prohibition times of the 40's and 50's, but when so many southern counties were "dry" and the only way to get a drink was to make it yourself. Like Granny on The Beverly Hillbillies.

Tim

cas
04-07-2004, 09:30
It's official now. See CNN link below:

http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/South/04/07/whiskey.ap/index.html

Craig

boone
04-13-2004, 07:25
This clip came from the Lexington Herald, (Monday's paper).

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Bettye Jo http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

tlsmothers
05-01-2004, 19:20
I agree with you, Mark. I like this better than Michter's, too, and I really enjoy Michter's. I had a sales rep drop a bottle by to try. His company is considering distributing it here in NY. I encouraged them to definitely do it.

I like to think of this whiskey like drinking a caramel macchiato hazelnut latte. You know it ain't the real thing, like drinking a shot of espresso or good ole American style black coffee, but every now and then you just do it cuz you like the sweet taste of it.

Being a "sweet home Alabama" gal, I find it kinda funny that they made this the official state spirit. I grew up in a dry county!

TNbourbon
12-15-2004, 15:00
Even if it were made in Alabama, I'm afraid I'd have to side with the Guv on this one. What happens if the label goes belly-up..?



I told you so. Kenny May, the originator and driving force behind making Conecuh Ridge Alabama's 'official' whiskey, was arrested Friday on felony charges that likely will put him out of business if convicted. Seems he was importing, marketing, selling and distributing his wares outside the state-controlled retail apparatus, and to minors, to boot -- in a dry county!http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/banghead.gif
Here're details:
Conecuh Ridge founder arrested -- Montgomery Advertiser (http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/NEWSV5/storyV5liquor1215w.htm)
Legislative sentiment is that if May gets a felony conviction, Conecuh Ridge will be 'denounced' as Alabama's official pour.
In the meantime, snap up those bottles! Instant collectible! (Can you say 'Ridgewood Reserve'?) http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/deadhorse.gif

Barrel_Proof
12-15-2004, 15:48
I told you so.


Wow, Tim. You sure did. Well done, o prescient one.

bluesbassdad
12-15-2004, 17:39
Yeah, Tim, given your demonstrated psychic powers, maybe I'd better take another look at the Aveo (even though my wife actually wants me to consider the RAV4 rather than my favored Vibe, just because it's bigger). http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

gr8erdane
12-15-2004, 19:22
Yeah Tim, and what are the winning numbers in this week's multistate powerball lottery? (Not that I'd play them unfairly....) http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif

cowdery
12-15-2004, 23:40
The AP story mentioned that one of his offenses was selling directly to consumers, which is prohibited under the mandatory 3-tier system. Even more offensive is that he was offering as a "deal" a six-bottle case for the bargain price of $240. That's about you'd pay for a case of Stagg!!!!!

Maybe he should plead insanity.

pepcycle
12-20-2004, 19:47
What say we get a consortium to buy and relabel the product?
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif

Charter13
01-06-2005, 10:49
Here is a little more fuel to add to the fire. I met with Mr. May and his Financial Manager regarding his whiskey about 6-7 months ago. At that time he informed me that he was building a distillery in Alabama to make Conecuh Ridge a pot-stilled whiskey. Here is the interesting part--he informed me that Lincoln Henderson jumped ship at L&amp;G to come to work for him at the distillery in Alabama! It would be interesting to hear Lincoln's side of this to say the least!

dgonano
01-06-2005, 13:04
While at the WhiskeyFest in NYC in November, I attended a seminar put on by Suntory for their Japanese whiskey , Yamazaki. Lincoln Henderson was working for them.

conecuhridge
08-08-2005, 18:41
Here is a little more fuel to add to the fire. I met with Mr. May and his Financial Manager regarding his whiskey about 6-7 months ago. At that time he informed me that he was building a distillery in Alabama to make Conecuh Ridge a pot-stilled whiskey. Here is the interesting part--he informed me that Lincoln Henderson jumped ship at L&amp;G to come to work for him at the distillery in Alabama! It would be interesting to hear Lincoln's side of this to say the least!



FYI,

Lincoln retired from Brown Forman in 2004. He is presently doing consultant work for BF (primarily Woodford Reserve) and Suntory.

While he offers fatherly advice on occasion, Lincoln is not affiliated with Conecuh Ridge.

Hope this helps.

ratcheer
08-08-2005, 20:23
Thanks for the info. It is always nice to have someone "in the know" around. Welcome to SB.com!

Tim

cowdery
08-08-2005, 23:20
But the question remains. What's the likelihood of an actual distillery being put into production there?

conecuhridge
08-10-2005, 09:58
But the question remains. What's the likelihood of an actual distillery being put into production there?



Our business plan calls for a small distillery by the end of 2009.

cowdery
08-10-2005, 13:33
Thanks. Don't you love people who actually answer questions?