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Paradox
06-16-2004, 17:40
I don't think Brooklyn Brewery Beer is distributed all over the US (it may be though) so I thought I'd share some pics and impressions with you of some of their 'core brand' brews I recently purchased.

Tonight we had their Brown Ale. I enjoyed it and Stacy really enjoyed it compared to other brews we have had recently. Oddly enough it has some hop bitterness to it, but in this style I really like it allot. For some reason I just cannot get past the bitterness in IPA's. It poured a nice dark almost mahogany<-(?) color. Not too thick and not too thin, it had a nice balance of 'roasted ingredient' taste (a little chocolate taste was present) and a very palatable bitter finish. This is one of those beers that you could have one too many of rather quickly, especially when served very cold.

Just in case anyone wants to check out Brookyn Brewery's Website, here's a link. (http://www.brooklynbrewery.com/home.asp) Oddly enough, it is located only a few blocks from where I grew up in Brooklyn... Though I moved from there when I was about 13.

Paradox
06-16-2004, 17:54
Stacy and I tasted this beer the other night and let me say she wasn't impressed but she downright does not like IPA's... I cannot blame her though, she loves beer probably more than me but just not bittery ones. For me on the other hand, I liked BB's version a bit more than others I have had.

The nose was very nice and I almost want to say I tasted a bit of citrus in it. To me, BB's IPA is not as bitter as others I have tried and that's probably why I like it a little bit more.

I have said before that I do like Pale Ale's though and at Jeff’s suggestion I picked up a bottle of Samuel Smith's Old Brewery Pale Ale and hope to try it this weekend while watching the game. I like Saranac's Pale Ale and unfortunately, Brooklyn Brewery does not make a Pale Ale. I really would like to have tried one from them... Oh well.

Gillman
06-16-2004, 18:30
I have had the Brooklyn EIPA numerous times. The citrus you mentioned is a characteristic of American-grown hops, especially Cascades. Many call the taste "grapefruit pith" or "piney". In my opinion, while many people enjoy this flavour, it is not an ideal hop for this type of beer. I like it when the beer is drunk chilled and when the hop is there but does not dominate. Ballantines XXX shows in my view an excellent use of Cascades. So does Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, quite widely available on the East Coast. But generally I like British-grown hops in pale ale or India Pale Ale. They have the right earthy, floral nose and flavour which are ideal for this type of beer. Some beers in the U.S. are brewed with imported English hops and approach the English template. They are often hard to find, though. Often by reading the label one can get a sense of whether an English palate is being aimed for. Imports only give an approximation of the true English ale palate, even the imported draft English beer (e.g., Bass Draft) which are pasteurised as are most of the bottled imports. (As beer and whisky writer Michael Jackson wrote classically in 1977, "pasteurisation kills stone dead all the life and spirit of the true English bitter"). Samuel Smith Pale Ale is a good product but doesn't really taste like English local draught (real) ale. Ditto the bottled and imported draft Fuller's or Young's beers from London, good beers again but rather pallid against the local draught versions. I am sure many East Coast micros make a good English-type pale ale or IPA (the dividing line can be hard to draw sometimes). One can experiment, ask questions. A Philadelphia brewery, Yard's, makes superb English-type beer. So does Geary of Maine.

Gary

Gillman
06-16-2004, 18:37
Mark, I wonder if English hops are used in this beer, or English varieties grown in America. Does the neck label say? I think a lower hop rate is one reason you may enjoy this beer better than its stablemate, EIPA, but the hop variety may explain it too..

Gary

Paradox
06-16-2004, 18:45
Thanks again for the very interesting and informative information Gary. At least I know I wasn't a bit crazy tasting the citrus in there! Grapefruit pith is a good way to describe it; at least that's how I recall it to a degree. I'll have to look for and try sometime the Ballantines XXX you spoke of. While I was stationed in California a few years back, Sierra Nevada Pale Ale was a huge thing, as I am sure it still is out there. All the other 'dorm rats' loved it but I never quite found what all the excitement was over. Some time has passed since then and I think I need to try revisiting it. I did buy Sierra Nevada Stout, Porter and Wheat a few weekends ago but still have not had time to try them. I left out their Pale Ale but I think I'll add some of it to the mix as well. Here's to experimentation and I am sure, many questions! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Paradox
06-16-2004, 18:50
It says it uses Cascade Hops Gary, as well as some others...

Malts: two-row pale malt, caramel malt, chocolate malt, biscuit malt, wheat malt
Hops: Cascade, Willamette and Northern Brewer

Could it be because I see they use wheat malt, or do most brews use wheat malt in some way or another? I know that my fav brews are wheat ones, particularly Blue Moon, Saranac Belgian White and Brooklyn Brewery's Weisse Beer.

robbyvirus
06-16-2004, 23:03
There was a fascinating article in the "Dining Out" section of today's NY Times where they interviewed one of the founders of the Brooklyn Brewery. He was talking about how beer brings out a lot of flavors in some foods better than wine does, and how certain beers (the India Pale Ale was mentioned) go really well with certain foods. A fascinating article, well worth reading. (You can read NY Times articles for free at www.nytimes.com (http://www.nytimes.com)).

Gillman
06-17-2004, 03:25
Wheat malt is used in British-style beers usually for head retention and would not affect flavour greatly. Cascades and Williamette are American hop varieties. Northern Brewer is an ale hop that is grown in various parts of the world and would impart a pleasant bitterness. I think the use of the numerous dark malts and the particular balance and level of the hop mix in the Brooklyn Brown clearly give a satisfying result. I have enjoyed the Brooklyn beers, particularly this one and the brewery's stout which has won numerous awards, the East India Pale Ale is less a favorite however. The Sierra Nevada beers are all high quality and the Pale Ale gets a good balance. Indeed experimentation is the key. There are many variables apart from hop variety so it is hard to generalise, yet many American pale ales seem oriented to that big citrus flavour you mentioned and it is one I find hard to come to terms with unless carefully handled by the brewer. Nothing "wrong" with any of these beers, it is all a question of taste, but just to see the range of flavors I'd try some imports and domestics that offer the English palate of pale ale based on English hops such as Fuggles and Goldings. There are a number of bottle-conditioned beers, both local and imported, that come quite close to the local English draught taste. Fullers 1845 is one from England. Black Sheep from Yorkshire is another which I believe is unpasteurised although filtered. I mentioned Yards and Geary and there are many more U.S. made English-type pales and IPA's. Anyway, a world of flavors to try!

Gary

Gillman
06-17-2004, 03:40
This is a very good point. Some beers are good for sipping with food whereas one might find that sipping a few on their own gives less satisfaction. I could see the Brooklyn EIPA going well with barbecue, say. Brooklyn is a classic craft brewery and brewer Garrett Oliver has done much in particular to promote the combination of beer and food, he has a recent book on the subject which is very interesting.

Mark had asked about wheat beer and again that is one I prefer to accompany food generally as opposed to drinking on its own. I find it goes well with fish of all kinds. Recently I had a Brooklyn wheat beer in Manhattan with chowder and other seafood and the combination could not be beaten.

Gary

jeff
06-17-2004, 03:44
Nice review Mark. I only wish I could find any of the Brooklyn Brewery offerings down here. I have never been much for "brown beers." I tend to gravitate toward either strong IPA's or Porters and Stouts. I do enjoy the Goose Island Hex Nut Brown Ale though. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/yum.gif

jeff
06-17-2004, 03:51
Leslie and I have really enjoyed the Sierra Nevada Wheat bear while munching on olives and various soft cheeses. I'm not a big fan of wheat beers. Usually I pick up on an overpowering bannana flavor that I find displeasing, most of all in the Flying Dog wheat http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif Of course this would turn out to be Leslie's favorite style of beer http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif

jeff
06-17-2004, 04:26
Gary, Mark et all,

Here is a helpful resourse for understanding the differences in the flavoring and bittering components of the various hop varietals: Hops 101 (http://realbeer.com/hops/FAQ.html)

Gillman
06-17-2004, 05:09
Thanks, Jeff, excellent rundown of hops, their uses and attributes. Under "varieties" the flavour of each is noted with accuracy (note he mentions "grapefruit" under Cascades, a common descriptior for this hop type). Of course each brewer's approach will determine the flavor profile. Hop type is one factor albeit an important one. I find with Cascades, too much is not always a good thing. In current beer lingo, I am not a "hophead", not for this variety at any rate. However when used sparingly and when the beer is served well-chilled and carbonated, I find Cascades-hopped beer quite good. I mentioned Ballantine XXX as an example, which is not a microbrewed beer but has been around for 100 years or so. To me it gets the use of Cascades just right. Widely available in the Northeast and especially New York although I think it is brewed now in the south by SAB/Miller somewhere (hard to keep up with all the changes in label and brewey ownership). Just to bring beer and whiskey into relation, the current All About Beer magazine (published out of Durham, NC) has an article on microdistillers, these being a dozen or so small restaurant-distilleries or free-standing operations out on the West Coast. None actually make a bourbon as yet but are experimenting with various barley and other spirits. No doubt a bourbon will follow before long but interesting that thus far these operations make scotch-type whisky, vodka, gin, and fruit spirits, nothing from a bourbon mash.

Gary

jeff
06-17-2004, 05:14
I, on the other hand , am a certified "hop-head" http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif The more the better! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/yum.gif While I do enjoy the "grapefruitiness" of the cascade hop, I tend to prefer IPAs brewed with Centennial hops, i.e. Bell's Two-Hearted Ale. They seem to impart a more floral flavor and aroma to the beer which I find to my liking.

Paradox
06-17-2004, 06:01
Thanks for the link Jeff, seems I will have some educational reading once I get home from work. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Paradox
06-17-2004, 06:05
Since many of us do enjoy beer as well as bouron, including women like Bettye Jo, my wife, etc, I was planning on bringing some beer with me to KY this year to be enjoyed at the gazebo... Maybe I'll have to bring a vareital 6pack of Brooklyn brews for you to try! I'd like to hear your opinions as well Jeff. You bring one of those two hearted ales though since I still have not found that here. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif

Paradox
06-17-2004, 06:10
Recently I had a Brooklyn wheat beer in Manhattan with chowder and other seafood and the combination could not be beaten.




Now that sounds like a great combo Gary. Stupid question, but even though you were in Manhattan, what kind of chowder were your enjoying; Manhattan or New England? I tend to like Manhattan better, but I think I could go for a bowl of NE with a nice Brooklyn Wheat beer...

Bob
06-17-2004, 06:26
I've got a "few" http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smilielol.gif beers laying around at most times. I'll bring some along as well. Some of you may have tried the Southhampton Burton Ale that I brought last year. I'm trying to get that again, as I thought that was a wonderful British style ale. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Bob

boone
06-17-2004, 06:36
Hey! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Please bring a few of those to my party. That would be a nice "extra" along with all the other "goodies" http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif I will admit that I have not tried alot of other beer's...I live in a small town and the selection is Fall's City http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif (j/k) Coor's, Sterling, Bud...etc....

To get a big selection I would havta travel to Louisville,---a 100 mile round trip for me...

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Bettye Jo http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Bob
06-17-2004, 06:36
I'm with you Jeff, cause hops make me "hoppy"! Some of my favorite hop head beers include: Victory Brewery's Hop Devil, Sierra Nevada's Celebration Ale (available during the holidays), Anderson Valley's Hop Ottin' IPA, Weyerbacher's Hop Infusion; Tupper's Hop Pocket Ale; Magic Hat's Blind Faith IPA, Brooklyn's East IPA, Grant's IPA, Greene King IPA. All of these are wonderful beers IMHO. There are lots of other styles I like as well, but when in doubt, I'll grab a hoppy brew anytime! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Bob

Gillman
06-17-2004, 07:09
Manhattan of course! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif It was at the Grand Central Terminal oyster bar and restaurant in the basement.

Although, I could see that Brooklyn Wheat going well with cream-based chowder too.

I had two beers, that one and Chimay White (from Belgium), both on draft, and all I can say is, both were great but the 8% Chimay threw me for a loop on the buzz, I had forgotten how potent it can be. Chimay White is not a wheat beer but rather a Triple-style beer but it went well after the Brooklyn Blanche (I think is the formal name of the Brooklyn Brewery's wheat beer).

Gary

Paradox
06-17-2004, 08:26
I've got a "few" http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smilielol.gif beers laying around at most times.



Let me say that Bob's beer bottle collection puts my bourbon collection to shame! I do remember that beer you brought last year Bob as Stacy had some, and it was very nice. Please do bring some more this year! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif

Paradox
06-17-2004, 08:32
Don't you worry Bettye Jo, we'll make sure you get to try a little of all the Brooklyn styles. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif We'regoing to have to seperate half the gazebo for a night! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif One half bourbon drinkers and the other half the beer drinkers.

Paradox
06-21-2004, 18:05
I have grown very fond of wheat beers and this is yet another one to add to the list. Stacy does want me to say though that she likes this wheat beer the least when paired against Saranac's and Blue Moon brews. I on the other hand like it because it is different and stands out from the others. It pours a hazy/cloudy dark yellow color with a nice head. The nose on this one really says yeast, as does the taste. Of all the beers I have had to date, this one has a real yeasty flavor almost like the smell of bread dough. I get a tiny bit of sweetness and an under note of bananas in it as well. All in all a great beer from Brooklyn Brewery and one I will definitely buy again. I still prefer Saranac's Belgian White a little more, but this one being different tasting makes for a nice change of pace.

Bob
06-22-2004, 04:51
Mark,

I agree that the Brooklyner Weisse is a great beer. I'll have to say that it is currently my favorite domestic wheat beer though. It has surpassed the Blue Moon brew in my book. I like the Saranac's as well, but they rate below Blue Moon. I still have very fond memories of the Celis White beer. Has anyone had the good fortune of trying it while it was available? It was the BEST wheat beer I've ever had. Unfortunately, Miller bought the Celis brewery and ultimately closed it! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/hot.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/hot.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/banghead.gif I guess they wanted to continue to just make the same old High Life http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/horseshit.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/bs.gif

Bob

doubleblank
06-22-2004, 06:20
Bob.....Celis was made right here in my "backyard", Austin, TX. Celis White was an excellent wheat beer and worked perfectly for our hot Texas summers. Their other beers, particularly the Grand Cru, were also pretty good. I toured the brewery in the late '90's and was impressed with their brewing process and use of high quality ingredients. When Miller shut them down, I went out and bought several cases of their beer but it's long gone. I haven't bought a Miller product since then. Fortunately there is a regional brewer located here in Houston, Saint Arnolds, which has picked up the quality torch and makes some good stuff.

I hadn't thought about Celis for a long time till you mentioned it here.

Randy

Bob
06-22-2004, 06:32
Randy,

I've also had the Grand Cru, and from what I remember of it, it too was a very good beer. The White is the one that stands out in my memory, and was an absolute favorite during summers here on LI. When Miller shut 'em down, I also bought as many cases of the White as I could find. Unfortunately, they too are long gone. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

I just checked my bottle collection and I also have Celis' Pale Ale, Pale Bock & Rasberry. I don't recall too much about the Ale or Bock, but I remember that the Rasberry was a damn good beer too.

At my local distributor, I recently saw a beer that had Pierre Celis' name on it. I think it was a Belgian style ale. Maybe there will be some things to look forward to from Celis once again. One can only hope!

As far as Miller goes... http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/puke.gif...

Bob

doubleblank
06-22-2004, 08:19
Looks like the Celis lineup is back in production. Apparently, the Michigan Brewing Co bought the brands and with the assistance of the Celis family is back making the entire lineup. They won the 2003 gold at the Great American Beer Festival competition with their Celis White....no suprize there. I'm going to ask my retailer to find some for me. They have two websites.

www.celis.com (http://www.celis.com) and www.michiganbrewing.com (http://www.michiganbrewing.com)

Can't wait to find some.

Randy

Paradox
06-22-2004, 12:49
Damn, you guys are making me thirsty! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif Thanks for the links; I will definitely be checking out the Celis White and Celis Raspberry. Hell, I'll try all of them in a 'variety pack' just so long as the place where Bob lives manages to get all 6 styles in! Add these onto the list Bob http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smilielol.gif Tell that guy at your distributor he needs to open a place here on SI! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif

bourbonmed
06-22-2004, 15:12
Q: Is there a noticeable diff between the Michigan Celis White and the Belgian Hoegaarden Pale? I had the latter in my recent vacation and it was the best tasting wheat beer I've ever had. A beer fan on the net calls it his favorite tasting beer..."like an angel peeing on my tongue" he wrote.

Let that sink in before rushing to find Hoegaarden.

Bob, was it you who said the man who started Celis (in Texas) is the same guy that crafted the original Hoegaarden in Belgium?

Cheers,
Omar

Bob
06-22-2004, 18:24
Omar,

Pierre Celis was indeed the brewer for Hoegaarden before he headed off to Texas to create his namesake beer. And I know I told one of my SB friends, that IMHO the Hoegaarden White is not nearly as good as the Celis White.

Randy's info that it will be available again is such great news! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/bowdown.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif
I will have to look into that for sure!

Bob

doubleblank
06-22-2004, 18:45
Bob....I have the Celis White in my fridge as I type this. I tried one and it is very good. Michigan Brewing says that Mr. Celis brought over his brewing engineer to assist in their startup. A few years ago, I heard a Michigan company had bought their old equipment and this just ties it all together. If you can't get this at home, I'll bring some to the festival in September. Next time I'm out, I'll buy the Grand Cru and the Rasberry. This is indeed good news that the Celis beers are back into production.

Randy

Bob
06-22-2004, 19:10
Randy,

I am SO jealous. And I am so hopeful and glad that Celis is back. I'll need to look at the links you posted earlier a bit more carefully tomorrow. I'm hoping that it'll be available in the NY area. I'll also have to talk to my local distributor.

Bob

bourbonmed
06-23-2004, 15:02
Thanks Bob.

Check comments after this review. Makes ya wanna go out and get some Hoe http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Gaarden!!

http://www.bottledbeer.co.uk/index.html?beerid=167

Omar

gr8erdane
06-23-2004, 21:18
Well, heedless of your warning, I went in search of Celis beer and found only Hoegaarden. I sit here with this curious ale, wondering at the way it tastes different with each sip. At 9 bucks a six, not any chance of being my everyday, but I'm having a heck of a time swatting that small bladdered angel away. The owner of the store where I picked it up was suggesting I try Baltica (sp?) a Russian Wheat Brew. They had a wheat, a dark and a pale. Anyone had it that can share their thoughts?

Gillman
06-24-2004, 04:42
Hoegaarden is very good, the classic Belgian wheat beer. I find the Belgian style of wheat beer is preferable to the South German style which can have a fairly strong clove or banana-like flavour (these are the "weizen" beers whether filtered or not - with "hefe" or not). The Belgian wheat beers tend more to a milky-like palate and are famously spiced with coriander to give an orange-like taste. I find it interesting that Pierre Celis who made Hoegaarden famous in Belgium before selling the brand to Interbrew started out as a milkman. He distributed and perhaps made milk in the small town where he helped out occasionally at a nearby small brewery that was making the disappearing style of Belgian white beer. When local men complained they couldn't find it anymore he revived the style. The old wheat beers were not, generally, very strong, some were intended as refreshers during field work, for example. Hoegaarden is made now at about 5% abv. which seems just right. (Celis, now in his late 70's, emigrated to America and set up a number of deals to make a similar brew and this is the Celis beer mentioned on the board recently. The ones I tried were very good but somehow the original, albeit made by a very large company, seems the most complex of the lot. As Dane said, every sip reveals different flavours). Baltika is a good quality beer, the blonde one we get here always had a dry snap to it and now I see why since it seems wheat is used in the mash. Apart from specialties such as Hoegaarden or Belgian Trappist or the best examples of other foreign beers, I find it best generally to sample local interpretations of foreign styles. New Belgium Brewing (Colorado) and New Glarus (Minnesota) for example make great beers in a number of Belgian wheat and related styles. But whether imported or not, freshness is the key to a good palate in beer. I am relentless when it comes to interpreting production or expiration dates on bottles and cans. The furthest ahead the expiration date, the better (almost always) will be the beer. We here in Toronto are getting Pilsener Urquel in cans (always better in my view than in the green bottles, which always seem light-affected to a degree) that are dated to about one year hence or more, clearly they are just off the ship after a fast ride and taste as they would at home (I am not speaking of the draft, of course). Ditto with a local micro (or any local) beer: some of them don't turn over that quickly and drunk too old they won't taste right.

Gary

Paradox
06-28-2004, 17:20
This beer poured your typical yellowish pilsner color, perhaps a bit darker than your 'average', and was very clear. I liked the taste of this pilsner. I got an initial malty flavor in the mouth with a nice slight bitter finish. I didn't get it after the first few sips, but initially it seemed totaste a bit 'tinny'. All of the other brews I got by Brooklyn Brewery from one particular distributor were fresh, thouh these pilsners were nearly 8 months old! I wonder if that played a bit in the 'tinny' role... Guess I'll have to throw in some 'fresher' pilsners in my next purchase! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif What I really hope to do this summer is make it to their brewery! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif

Paradox
07-05-2004, 08:40
Yet another brew we had this weekend... Bob was nice enough to break out some bottles, rather old ones at that, from his bunker to share. Brooklyn Brewery makes a barleywine style ale only 3-4 months out of the year and even then it is in very limited quantities. Well, he brought one from 2000 that says right on the label "Specially brewed for the Millenium". I had a barleywine brew once before from Anchor Steam and loved it. Theirs comes in 7oz bottles though; BB's come in full 12 oz bottles.

For being as strong as it is (generally between 11 and 12% alcohol) it drinks very easily. This was one complex beer with alot of flavors going on in it. Not bitter at all, kind of sweet actually. I know its not readily distributed all over, but this is one to try if you ever see it.

Paradox
07-11-2004, 17:38
This brew actually used to be called Pennant Pale Ale '55, but ow it is just called Brooklyn Ale. There still is a small '55 on the front of the label though. here's a pic of the old label---> http://www.ratebeer.com/beerimages/533.jpg

I liked this Pale Ale quite a bit. Great malty aroma and mouthfeel with just the right amount of bitterness lingering around on the finish. Another great beer from Brooklyn Brewery, but their Brown Ale is still my favotite (next to their Monster Ale!).

Paradox
07-22-2004, 17:55
Really cannot say much here except yet another great beer from Brooklyn Brewery. Bob told me early on, in his opinion, that Garret Oliver was an excellent brewmaster and I am agreeing with him more with each beer I have from them. This beer was simple yet complex, very malty and had just the right amount of hops for me. Very well rounded with a nice head and color. I'll be sure to bring some Brooklyn Brews to the festival this year for those who are into beer as well as bourbon and want to try these not readily available brews...

ratcheer
07-22-2004, 19:20
Nice picture. Now I am thirsty. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Tim

kgiammarco
07-24-2004, 07:59
I can definitely attest to the Brooklyner Weisse beer... In the past I frequented a bar that had this on tap... Definitely a favorite...

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif-Chris

Paradox
08-16-2004, 17:14
Man, Garret Oliver keeps amazing me with some of these woderful brews! After not caring much at all for the last Chocolate stout I had, I was worried that this one would have that same tsate profile to it but am I impressed. Beautiful black in color with a moderate tan colored head this beer pours nice and thick n' rich looking. Upon first sip you get a great thick and creamy mouthfeel followed by a mildly sweet chocolate/mocha/coffee taste. It goes down ever so smoooooth with just a perfect balance of everything. Its a shame yet good that this beer is only available once a year from them because it makes you anticipate its release even more! I think BB's chocolate stout is a great example of this style.

doubleblank
09-25-2004, 15:46
Hey Bob and Mark.......I'm trying the East India Pale Ale you sent me and it's good. As you commented, it's not as hoppy/bitter as most (I like bitter IPA's), and it's very smooth. Barely fits the category, but perfect for those that find most IPA's too bitter. Val really likes it. Next on the list will be the Brooklyn Ale.....tomorrow. Thanks for sending me the great assortment of your local brews.

Randy

Gillman
09-25-2004, 16:42
Randy, I acquired one too courtesy Mark, and I agree it is good. Not a "big" American or English-accented IPA but very drinkable. Good chaser for, say, the Buzz or Jim Beam White Label. Of Mark's beers in this flight (i.e., all Brooklyn Brewery) I thought the Brown Ale was the best. It is in the northern English style, that is, about 5% abv and well-malted and hopped - not sweet as brown ale used to be (at any rate) in London and environs. The Brooklyn weissebier also is very good, expertly made, better I think than the Celis white ale.

Gary

Bob
09-25-2004, 17:07
Randy,

Glad you like the IPA. It isn't a hop monster like many that are out there, which I also enjoy, but it is a good brew. Keep us posted as you progress thru the assortment! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Bob

Bob
09-25-2004, 17:19
Gary,

I agree that the Bklyn Weissebier is very good, but better than Celis White? Since I was the lucky recipient of some Celis White, courtesy of Randy, I'll have to taste them together. I've considered the Celis to be the best White that I've ever had. BTW, if you ever have the good fortune of seeing Blanche de Brooklyn on tap at your favorite pub, give it a try. I believe that I posted about this beer earlier. It's only available in kegs. This is a FINE Belgian style White beer. Not to be overly technical, but the Brooklyner Weiss is a Bavarian style Wheat beer (as stated in Brooklyn's website. So, the comparison really is between 2 different styles (Celis White and the Brooklyner Weisse), but your preference is quite a compliment nonetheless.

I'm going to try to save a bottle of the Celis White, in hopes of comparing it next summer to the Blanche de Brooklyn.

Bob

tlsmothers
09-25-2004, 19:12
I brought a Brooklyn Chocolate Stout to Bettye Jo. Figured you can't go wrong with the word chocolate when giving gifts to a woman, right? If you are ever around Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, stop in the Brazenhead bar. They keep several Brooklyn beers and have a very nice beer selection overall...even hand-pulled.

boone
09-25-2004, 19:35
I brought a Brooklyn Chocolate Stout to Bettye Jo.



You are right http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Can't go wrong with Chocolate http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Actually, I have them tucked away in the fringe probably until tomorrow night when I usually kick back a pop a few during the chat here at SB.com http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Tonya gave me a "basket" full of goodies. There "were" some chocolates in there http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif let me tell ya...they were awsome! My entire family really enjoyed those...

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Thank you so much! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I have been busy writing Thank You notes to the guest that brought me such fine gifts. Alot of folks I don't have a address http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif so I am in the process of getting all of my pictures together, along with my "Thank You's" in order http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Here is a picture that I took of you and Ben at the Gazebo.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif Bettye Jo http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Gillman
09-25-2004, 23:57
You are right, Bob, that the two styles of wheat beer are different (Bavarian vs. the Belgian white style of wheat beer) but still as a general class (wheat beer) I feel it is fair to compare them and the Brooklyn beer has the edge by its greater complexity. The Celis beer tends to be a bit monochrome to my taste, it is good but doesn't quite attain to the Hoegaarden original which Pierre Celis originally brewed in Belgium. In other words the Hoegaarden and Brooklyn weisse stand in closer relation (I would say) than Mr. Celis' latter-day, new-world creations. Now, I will grant you the Blanche de Brooklyn draft beer is very good too, I have had it in New York. It would offer a fairer comparison to the Celis beer, as would (say) Unibroue's white beer (the Blanche de Chambly), by virtue of being strictly in the Belgian white style but again it trumps the Celis in my view. I recall it had an orange coriander-type complexity the Celis lacks. Pierre Celis is a legend in the beer business and any beer with his name on it will be very good but Garrett Oliver is tough competition!

Gary

Bob
09-26-2004, 09:24
Gary,

As you say, both are definitely wheat beers and therefore can be compared. I guess I was just getting a bit too specific. Nonetheless, your observations are duly noted, and I will look forward to trying and comparing the Celis with the Brooklyner Weisse.

Maybe my taste buds just lean towards the Celis White, as I prefer it much more than the Hoegarrden. In contrast to that, I lean against the Unibroue brews, as I tend to find them too sweet for my tastes.

BTW, have you tried Blue Moon's white beer? I think it is pretty good, widely available, and not too pricy. IMHO, I think it is the best product that Coors makes.

Bob

Gillman
09-26-2004, 10:37
Hi Bob, well I should give the Celis a try again but to me it never (and it has been brewed in different places as you know in North America) matched the bottled Hoegaarden. Even in color the latter has a certain shimmer and a complexity of palate the new world "emulation" does not; of course, the recipe may not be exactly the same and probably that is so for legal reasons.

I have tried Blue Moon and I think it is excellent. It shows that large breweries can make fine beers if they really want to. Then too, I have always liked Coors anyway , not the Light, the Original, also I like Killians. When served very fresh on draft these have a very good taste. Coors Original isn't as hoppy as 20 years ago but it is still very good, however it needs to be drunk very fresh to see its merits. But regarding wheat beers, the Brooklyn Weisse and Blanche de Brooklyn show that artisan styles from far away can be recreated and become (in a sense) new again. You need brewers with a good palate and great skill: this can be found in a small brewery or larger one. Garret Oliver typifies the high quality craft brewer. Fuller (a medium-size independent in U.K.) is an example of a quality mid-size brewer, so is Saranac in the U.S., or Yeungling; and Urquel in Czech Republic again is the large brewery that makes a fine craft-type product. Size (big or small) doesn't matter, it is committment and brewing skill that together make great beers.

Gary