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bourbonmed
08-11-2004, 07:32
This September, Macallan is coming out with a new line of single malts. The Fine Oak collection will feature whiskey aged in bourbon barrels. Details:

http://www.marketwire.com/mw/release_html_b1?release_id=71121

Omar

Gillman
08-11-2004, 08:37
Interesting. I had a Macallan aged in a bourbon barrel as sold by Hart, the well-known merchant. So it wasn't official Macallan. I must say, based on that sample, that the whisky struck me as sort of pallid. Howver possibly this new series, aged under official Macallan auspices, will back up Michael Jackson's statement. Macallan is an innovative brand, their Decade Series is very interesting, certainly. Some of that whisky was not aged in new sherry wood (hallmark of The Macallan) but I think they used reused sherry casks where first-fillings were not used, i.e., I don't think they used any bourbon barrel-aged whisky for any of that series. So this announcement indicates something that is really a departure for them. Anyway, all the Decade Series (20's, 30's, 40's, 50's) were very good.

Gary

OneCubeOnly
08-11-2004, 08:57
That might just make me eat my words...I always promised myself I'd never buy another Macallan because it's so sherry-laden.

clayton
08-11-2004, 12:18
It's great to see an established distillery taking risks like this. Not exactly innovative, since bourbon casks have long been used for age Scotch, but certainly new for Macallan.

This decision must have been made more than 20 years ago? There's something so fascinating about the way change happens in this industry. The results of small changes in water, stills, mash bills, barrels/casks/butts, etc. will not be entirely clear for 5, 10, or 20 years down the line. A beautiful, romantic and completely crazy way of doing business. I love it.

Gillman
08-11-2004, 14:50
Gary, if the Decade series is available in your area, buy the 1940's one. It is much less sherried than normal. Also, it uses a certain amount of peated Macallan (the standard Macallan today is very lightly peated if at all) because in the war years coal was short and the distillery reverted to peat to dry the malt. This is a Macallan with character.

Gary

dgonano
08-11-2004, 17:13
I also just read this article and wonder why such a great whiskey is debuting a new product line. Didn't they just stop marketing their 15 yr malt in the U.S. and limit the 18 yr due to shortages?

Perhaps they had a shortage of spanish oak casks and stored their excess whiskies in bourbon and refill sherry casks. Such whisky is usually sold to independants and blenders. So maybe this is just a marketing gimmick to cover their shortage of world reknowned malt.

bourbonmed
08-12-2004, 08:21
Maybe...but that new 15y sounds intriguing.
Omar

dgonano
08-12-2004, 09:22
Yes they do sound intriguing. I will definitely try the 15 yr.

Bamber
08-13-2004, 07:24
Macallan, without sherry. Sounds all wrong to me. Its like those 17YO expressions of Ardbeg and Bowmore that are apparently more subtle. I find them thin and disappointing - not enough peat. When you drink Macallan you expect sherry (I think its delicious). If its not to your liking there are quite a few other Scotches to choose from.

Cheers,

B.

OneCubeOnly
08-13-2004, 09:01
Macallan, without sherry. Sounds all wrong to me. Its like those 17YO expressions of Ardbeg and Bowmore that are apparently more subtle. I find them thin and disappointing - not enough peat. When you drink Macallan you expect sherry (I think its delicious). If its not to your liking there are quite a few other Scotches to choose from.



I get where you're coming from with the whole 'sacrilege' bit, but I know on many occasions when I've tasted Macallans I've thought to myself "gosh, I know there must be some really good whisky in there, but it's overwhelmed by all this Godawful sherry."

More power to you if that's your thing, but I am definitely intrigued by this new release.

Nokia
08-15-2004, 15:16
I'll start off by noting that I am partial to the traditional sherried Macallan.

Last week I went a tasting for the new "Fine Oak" Macallan. There are 3 versions, 10, 15, and 21 yrs. old. I personnally did not enjoy any of them, without the sherry I felt I could find many other malts that would be better. I am not sure what the prices will be yet.

Also, they changed the bottle shape and packaging on the old line-up as well.

David (sorry no tasting notes to post)

Bamber
08-16-2004, 02:07
I get where you're coming from with the whole 'sacrilege' bit, but I know on many occasions when I've tasted Macallans I've thought to myself "gosh, I know there must be some really good whisky in there, but it's overwhelmed by all this Godawful sherry."

More power to you if that's your thing, but I am definitely intrigued by this new release.




Truth is - I'll buy a bottle I just can't see it holding up against the best of the Speyside and Highland malts without the Sherry ... only one way to find out I guess http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Cheers,


B.

OneCubeOnly
08-16-2004, 03:27
Truth is - I'll buy a bottle I just can't see it holding up against the best of the Speyside and Highland malts without the Sherry ... only one way to find out I guess



That appears to be the case...at least that's what David posted about it (he was privaleged enough to taste it already!?). In a way I'm disappointed--I always had assumed that the underlying malt to the Macallan was exceptional, but now it seems like it *NEEDS* the sherry for camoflauge. Or, maybe it's built from the 'ground up' to be a sherry-fest. Oh well...like you said, there are plenty of other malts. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Bamber
08-16-2004, 04:56
It would appear so - but we all have different tastes - so I'll try the cheapest expression at least.

I like Sherry so its no surprise I like Macallan.

BTW my favourite Highland whisky is Highland Park 18YO. In fact its my favourite Scotch.

Cheers,

B.

Nokia
08-16-2004, 07:24
It would appear so - but we all have different tastes - so I'll try the cheapest expression at least



Exactly, we all have different tastes, so I am sure that the new Macallans will appeal to many, maybe more so to those who do not enjoy the current sherried versions. I really enjoy Balvenie in all its various expressions but I know some people who don't enjoy any of them. My initial disappointment will not stop me from resampling the new Macallans at WhiskyFest this November.

This tasting that I attended was a media launch at a hotel in NYC. The regular Macallan 12 and Cask Strength versions were also served and no doubt helped to form my impressions. I did come away with some very nice glassware in the giftbag they gave out.

I have tried a few independent versions of Macallan that were not sherried and that I enjoyed, specifically a 20 yr old bottled by Signatory from 1975.

In terms of price, it looks like the 10 will be around $44, the 15 at $65, and the 21 at $220.

-David

Bamber
08-16-2004, 07:53
I'm very fond of Balvenie also, save the Doublewood. Sounds like a nice afternoon tasting all those new whiskies.

What's your favourite regular Macallan - I must admit I really enjoy the cask strength and generally stick to that. The 18YO is good but a bit pricey for what it - is IMHO.

Cheers,

B.

Nokia
08-17-2004, 17:12
I also enjoy the Cask Strength. I used to drink the 18yr on a regular basis when it was $60 a bottle, but not only did the price go up but the quality went down. Perhaps my favorite Macallan was the Gran Reserva 18 yr that was out a few years ago. That was pricey but worth it. I'm not sure but I think that it has been discontinued.

I pour the Balvenie 15yr and the Islay Cask fairly often and if you ever come across a bottle of Aberlour 18 then grab it. That was a US only version and my favorite Aberlour but it was replaced by the 21yr which was more expensive.

-David

Bamber
08-18-2004, 01:10
Cheers - I'll keep an eye out for it.