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cowdery
08-31-2004, 14:02
Dining in a Mexican restaurant the other night, I enjoyed a Herradura Reposado. If bourbon is often misunderstood and wrongly considered a harsh, unsophisticated drink, tequila has it even worse. Sipping a Herradura Reposado neat is a lovely experience. I would do it much more often if there weren't so much bourbon to drink.

doubleblank
08-31-2004, 15:19
Chuck......In the Price of Tequila thread, I stated the Herradura Reposado is my favorite tequila. Next time, try the reposado by El Tesoro as its also quite good.

Randy

lakegz
09-01-2004, 02:36
you bring up a good point when mentioning tequila's perceived harshness. I have had Tequila on ice before and I really enjoyed it in the company of some friends who looked at me like I was crazy. I offered them some and said that it was very gentle and they gave me the crazy eye and backed off. their loss, my gain.
so many people think that Bourbon and Tequila are gasolines. i dont know about you guys but ive had some beers and ales that have a much harsher flavor and aftertaste then my beloved EWSB, so it really catches my attention when people down that stuff, then bash Bourbon for being hard-core on the palate.

Sweetmeats
10-11-2005, 14:34
My next neighbor is a wonderful man. He barely speaks a lick of English and needs to have his daughter translate for him. I would say that he is the Mexican equivalent of some of you guys. He has a bunker but it is solid Tequila. Multiple bottles of Tequila adorn his living room right next to his shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe. He is very cool. Anyway, I gave him a table and an entertainment center yesterday and he comes back with a bottle of Cazadores Resposado for me. His daughter tells me that when he went to Mexico recently, he picked up three bottles. One for his father, one for himself, and one for me. To him, this is a HUGE present. To me as well to be honest. So I thank him for the wonderful gift and go inside my house to enjoy. Now, I've had Cazadores Resposado before and have loved it every time. However, this time, there was something different. When, I opened it, it smelled like a wonderful margarita. Just very fragrant. Now I'm not sure if the Mexicans save the best tequila for themselves but they must for this was the best tequila I have ever had. I'm planning on getting him a bottle of bourbon for Christmas so hopefully he will appreciate it as much as I appreciate his gift.

gr8erdane
10-11-2005, 19:47
Nice story. I hope your neighbor enjoys your gift as much as you do his. One of my best friends and I swap bottles every Christmas, Bushmills for him and Wild Turkey 101 for me. I don't know about the Bushmills, but that is the finest Wild Turkey I can imagine because of the source. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

Vange
10-28-2005, 12:05
Tequila is my first love when it comes to spirits. I have amassed quite a collection of anejo (aged) tequilas. Here is my link.

https://67.85.199.137/em/tequila.nsf/pgown

I have tried nearly 100 types of tequila and am a HUGE fan. I especially like it with the traditional mexican chaser of sangrita. A spicy/tomato drink to sip after each sip of fine tequila.

Sweetmeats
10-28-2005, 12:27
The Cazadores Resposado I got from my next door neighbor is the Mexican version. It seemed very smooth, and as I was looking at the label it was 70 something proof instead of the usual 80 proof American import. Anyone have any idea why the difference?

Vange
10-28-2005, 12:59
The tequilas expored into the US carry an 80 proof, while the ones that remain in Mexico are 76. Not sure why really, but that's the trend.

cowdery
10-28-2005, 15:32
US law requires straight spirits, including tequila, to be sold at at least 80 proof. They can sell it at a lower proof, but they would have to label it "diluted."

A lot of spirits outside the U.S. are sold at 70, 74 or 76 proof.

Why 80? It's arbitrary, much like the 21-year-old drinking age. You have to draw a line somewhere. It's consumer protection, so you don't have to look at the proof of everything you buy. If you buy a straight spirit (whiskey, brandy, tequila, rum, gin, vodka, etc.) it will be no less than 80 proof and you can count on that. As it happens, most producers have adopted the minimum as the standard, so most straight spirits products are sold at 80 proof.

ratcheer
10-28-2005, 16:09
Can you give us a good recipe for sangrita? Or, is it just something you buy?

Tim

CrispyCritter
10-28-2005, 20:45
Could some of these 70 proof or 76 proof spirits be using the Sykes system rather than ABV * 2?

cowdery
10-30-2005, 23:50
I don't know, what's the Sykes system?

Gillman
10-31-2005, 04:33
I can answer that. Bartholomew Sykes was an English scientist who developed a proof ascertainment system which later was used to announce proof strength on whisky and other spirits labels. Under his sytem, alcohol spirits were considered proven, i.e., of sufficient strength, at 57.1% ABV. He ascertained this by burning mixtures of gunpowder and alcohol, at 57.1% ABV the mixture flared adequately in his view. To this proven strength he assigned arbitrarily the number 100. Pure alcohol or 100% ABV was however in his system 175 proof, not 200 proof as in the more logical U.S. system, and thus termed 75 overproof (75 OP in the old labelling). E.g., 70 proof is 30 underproof (30 UP) and this equates (when you examine conversion tables) to U.S. 80 proof. You can use a rule of thumb that for every number of Sykes proof over or under 100 this represents 1/2% alcohol by volume but this is approximate only apparently since conversion tables I have consulted show e.g., 70 Sykes proof as 80 U.S. proof (not 84 proof or 42% ABV: 57%-15%=42%). The Sykes system was adopted by the United Kingdom, its former colonies, and other countries within the U.K. trade orbit or otherwise in its influence. In the early 1980's, the Sykes system of announcing alcohol content was abandoned in the U.K. in favor of the European Union norm which uses the Gay Lussac system which measures alcohol by the volume of ethanol in the container. The suggestion (or rather query) is whether some countries, perhaps smaller ones where change proceeds slowly, may still use the Sykes system for the labels of whiskey and other spirits. Unless the alcohol by volume content is also shown on the label there is no way to know without consulting its applicable laws.

Gary

Vange
10-31-2005, 08:51
I really like this one sangrita made by sangrita real. Search for it on google, comes up easily. It has a nice thickness and a nice spiciness to it that I really enjoy. One bottle goes a long way.

As for a homemade sangrita this is from a member of the tequila forum I participate in. Here is a link to the forum and below that I pasted his sangrita recipe.

http://www.ianchadwick.com/forum/index.php?showforum=6

recipe for Sangrita (ala "reifer")

LARGE
1 litre of tomato juice
1/4 litre of fresh orange juice
juice of 3 limes
2 table spoons of maggi sauce
2 table spoons of worchestershire sauce
1 table spoon of tabasco
1 table spoon of grenadine (optional, will make it sweeter)
large pinch of salt (to taste)
large pinch of pepper (to taste)
shake well, refrigerate

SMALL
1 cup of tomato juice
1/4 cup of fresh orange juice
juice of 1 lime
2 tea spoons of maggi sauce
2 tea spoons of worchestershire sauce
1/4 to 1/2 tea spoon of Tabasco
teaspoon of grenadine (optional, will make it sweeter)
pinch of salt; pinch of pepper
shake well, refrigerate

grenadine is optional. I don't use it but some people do

ratcheer
10-31-2005, 19:24
Thanks. Sounds good! Seems to have quite a bit in common with a Bloody Mary, although more complex.

Tim

gr8erdane
10-31-2005, 20:57
I have to ask, what is maggi sauce? Never heard of it before. And how many maggi do you have to squeeze to get enough for a tablespoon? http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif

Vange
11-01-2005, 10:25
It's available in most ehtnic aisles in a grocery store.

http://www.mexgrocer.com/2708.html

gr8erdane
11-01-2005, 20:03
Thanks for the info, I'll have to check it out.

alphaiii
11-10-2005, 22:47
If bourbon is often misunderstood and wrongly considered a harsh, unsophisticated drink, tequila has it even worse.



Isn't that a sad truth. I've tried so hard to get friends to appreciate tequila, but sometimes it's almost impossible to abolish preconceived notions.

Paulbrad25
04-03-2006, 12:07
Isn't that a sad truth. I've tried so hard to get friends to appreciate tequila, but sometimes it's almost impossible to abolish preconceived notions.
Too many people associate tequila with the cheaper standards which are blended with stuff like cane spirit. If it doesn't say 100% agave on it then don't bother, and I find that this is my best U.S.P.

TimmyBoston
05-25-2006, 04:36
I have a bottle of Cielo Anejo which I absolutely adore, it's rich and smooth with a strong citrus and floral character. It's a great drink and I would recommend it to anyone that enjoys a fine spirit neat. My guy at my favorite liquor store recommended it to me and I am very grateful.

PS Cielo Anejo just took the championship at the recent San Francisco spirits competition. It was awared a 96, the highest rating ever given to a tequila in the competition.

Vange
05-25-2006, 06:51
I think Cielo is a very good new tequila that has hit the market and agree with your tasting notes, but not the best anejo I have tried, not by a longshot IMHO.

CrispyCritter
05-26-2006, 22:31
I'd like to find good tequilas in smaller bottles (e.g. 200 or 375 ml). I've had Cuervo Gold from a (glass) miniature bottle, and wasn't impressed. However, Cuervo Gold isn't particularly well-regarded among tequila aficionados. Even so, I'm not sure I want to shell out a fair bit of change for something that I might not like...

I suppose I could look for a bar on Collins St. in Joliet - when I drive down that street, I sometimes wonder, ¿En qué país estoy? :slappin:

cowdery
05-30-2006, 19:47
I'd like to find good tequilas in smaller bottles (e.g. 200 or 375 ml).

Unfortunately, only mass appeal products are sold in anything other than the 750 ml. It was a big deal, for example, when Knob Creek was made available in the full range of sizes. It meant the brand had arrived. You probably can find something other than Cuervo in a smaller size, but not a top-of-the-line aged tequila.

Vange
05-31-2006, 07:41
I have been drinking 100% blue agave anejo tequila for years and have only come across a few 375 ml bottles. Typcially they are higher priced bottlings like Porfidio Barrique. The 750 ml is near $600 so the 375 ml is a way to taste it at a lower price. Off the top of my head I can't remember any others.

If you ever come across El Tesoro anejo try it. It's sub $40 and a really great tequila. Some of the traditional methods are still used to produce it. Also, Tonala Suprema Reserva. Sub $50 and really good as well.

Jake_Parrott
05-31-2006, 08:28
The regular Tonala anejo is quite fine as well. I haven't popped my bottle of Tonala SR yet.

CrispyCritter
07-17-2006, 22:13
I was over at my nearby Binny's the other day, and there was a nice lady pouring samples of Distinguido tequila - blanco, reposado, and añejo. They're 100% agave tequilas, and all of them, IMO, were vastly better than the Cuervo Gold that I tried earlier this year.

I ended up picking up a bottle of the reposado - it's quite nice neat, and I think it'll be quite mixable as well.

Gillman
04-04-2007, 20:48
Amongst my admittedly small tequila selection, I find Herradura Reposado the best. It is very balanced, slightly sweet (only a little, but just enough to take the edge off), vegetal and spicy (peppery) and a little saline too. I like just a little later in the evening.

My second favouite is Cuervo Gold. This drink has, I know, little cachet amongst most connoisseurs, but that doesn't mean they're right. It has a very good house flavour. Sweet it is, but I don't mind sweetness and it goes well after dinner, I find. In a margarita, I just add less triple sec and get the house taste without excess sugar in that classic cocktail.

My 4 Copas Blanco is good but more austere: bone dry, perhaps too authentic for me.

I have a couple of (personal) vattings but they are not successful due to my adding a South African tequila-like drink and it just doesn't work with the real thing: too earthy and raw. Oh well. (In margaritas though the vats are fine).

For some reason when sipping the Herradura I feel like smoking a Camel or some other American cigarette - but I won't. :)

Gary

cowdery
04-19-2007, 12:26
There is nothing wrong with drinking and enjoying whatever you like. The issue with Cuervo Gold is that most people don't understand what it is, especially with regard to its color, which most people assume comes from aging. It does not. Cuervo Gold is a mixto tequila (i.e., not 100% agave) with caramel coloring added to give it color and a little more flavor and sweetness. It's the equivalent of a blended whiskey. Nothing wrong with that, but that's what it is.

Gillman
04-20-2007, 14:08
I think the Especial Oro is an excellent product because it has a unique and first rate flavor. All the rest is of interest (e.g., blend-type tequila, uses cane sugar as the non-blue agave element (presumably), added color, etc.) but secondary to its excellence as a drink in the tequila family. The only change I'd make is to make it slightly less sweet, but I can modify the sweetness in various ways (e.g. by adding some 100% blue agave tequila and maybe some white rum, I actually do this from time to time).

Gary

Sweetmeats
05-09-2007, 12:55
Anyone know of any 100 proof Tequila besides JB Wagoners which is not quite Tequila anyway?

Vange
05-09-2007, 13:33
Sweet,

Why are you looking for 100 proof? I am pretty sure all (or most) tequila is either 80 proof (US imports) or 76 proof (in Mexico).

I am a huge tequila fan. It was the catalyst that started me on the articles and collecting and consuming premium spirits in all categories.

Sweetmeats
05-09-2007, 15:51
I've discovered that I do not care for spirits as much if they are 80 proof. I like them higher. So if I enjoy a good tequila at 80, then I wonder what a good tequila at 100 tastes like. I can't find any other than the aforementioned "Temequila" and I'm not sure if I want to spend 50 dollars on that.

afisher
05-13-2007, 14:30
The PA LCB are closing out Jose Cuervo Reserva de la Familia at an only moderately scary price. It has a nose like cognac, with just enough of a vegetal cactus note to tell you it's tequila. At 80 proof there's no lack of flavor; again you can tell it's tequila, but it's dominated by sweet oranges, vanilla and smoke. It finishes long and slightly astringent. I will be reserving this for special occasions and guests.

Ubertaster
05-14-2007, 06:06
The PA LCB are closing out Jose Cuervo Reserva de la Familia at an only moderately scary price. It has a nose like cognac, with just enough of a vegetal cactus note to tell you it's tequila. At 80 proof there's no lack of flavor; again you can tell it's tequila, but it's dominated by sweet oranges, vanilla and smoke. It finishes long and slightly astringent. I will be reserving this for special occasions and guests.

In its price range this is my favorite Tequila. I always have a bottle of this on hand. Shoppers Vineyard has this on sale for $72.

bj

doubleblank
05-15-2007, 10:13
I happened by Village Liquors the other day and the Republic Beverage folks were there making a delivery and showing the owner some new products. They pressed me to taste and give an opinion on a new tequila they carry......Tezon. It is a new "super premium" tequila owned by Pernod Ricard. So first, here's the marketing hype.

100% tahona processed.......where they use a 2 ton millstone made from tezontle, a mexican volcanic stone. The pictures are impressive.

A three day fermentation of both the pulp and juice....most just ferment the juice.

Of course, its 100 % blue agave from their "estate".....no purchased plants.

Three days baking in their brick ovens.

So much for their story....how does it taste? They poured me their anejo....aged 18 to 20 months in oak. Very nice. The oak doesn't overshadow the spirit like I find in many anejo tequilas. This is very easy to drink.....somewhat analogous to some of the Van Winkle wheated bourbons compared to the rest of bourbondom. I asked the retail and was quoted $65....but I could have it at his wholesale price of $40 for being the first customer. So I ended up with it as I do enjoy tequila from time to time.

The packaging is a little hokey......a replica tezontle millstone for a bottle cap and a metal plate on one side of the bottle with hieroglyphics telling their story.

I haven't done a side by side with some of my other favorites yet.

Randy

Virus_Of_Life
05-15-2007, 23:08
So much for their story....how does it taste? They poured me their anejo....aged 18 to 20 months in oak. Very nice. The oak doesn't overshadow the spirit like I find in many anejo tequilas. This is very easy to drink.....somewhat analogous to some of the Van Winkle wheated bourbons compared to the rest of bourbondom. I asked the retail and was quoted $65....but I could have it at his wholesale price of $40 for being the first customer. So I ended up with it as I do enjoy tequila from time to time.

I haven't done a side by side with some of my other favorites yet.

Randy
Sounds good Randy, curious did you only taste the Anejo? I know I rambled about this a bit at the Gazebo, but a lot of late night talk is kind of foggy... I'll have to keep my eyes open and grab a bottle of the Tezon.

I personally am not a fan typically of Anejos, and this past weekend in Oregon I tried the Mexican release version of Gran Centenaurio Anejo. I was not impressed and I don't think the the fact that it was only 76proof helped any! Its too bad because there Plata is one of my all time faves.

.... All that said I do very much enjoy the Jose Cuervo Reserva de la Familia, which I believe is an Anejo.

Mark, as for higher proof Tequilas I have long wanted some myself, the only one I know of is the Herradura Blano (not silver) which is 92proof. Bevmo does typically carry it, have not tried it myself, but am getting thirsty...

TBoner
05-16-2007, 04:57
I happened by Village Liquors the other day and the Republic Beverage folks were there making a delivery and showing the owner some new products. They pressed me to taste and give an opinion on a new tequila they carry......Tezon. It is a new "super premium" tequila owned by Pernod Ricard. So first, here's the marketing hype.

100% tahona processed.......where they use a 2 ton millstone made from tezontle, a mexican volcanic stone. The pictures are impressive.

A three day fermentation of both the pulp and juice....most just ferment the juice.

Of course, its 100 % blue agave from their "estate".....no purchased plants.

Three days baking in their brick ovens.

So much for their story....how does it taste? They poured me their anejo....aged 18 to 20 months in oak. Very nice. The oak doesn't overshadow the spirit like I find in many anejo tequilas. This is very easy to drink.....somewhat analogous to some of the Van Winkle wheated bourbons compared to the rest of bourbondom. I asked the retail and was quoted $65....but I could have it at his wholesale price of $40 for being the first customer. So I ended up with it as I do enjoy tequila from time to time.

The packaging is a little hokey......a replica tezontle millstone for a bottle cap and a metal plate on one side of the bottle with hieroglyphics telling their story.

I haven't done a side by side with some of my other favorites yet.

Randy

Interesting. I also got to try some Tezon at a local liquor store here in Dallas yesterday. The store was pouring the reposado and the blanco. They were both very good, I thought, showing strong flavors of pepper and herbs. In the case of the reposado, I picked up a bit of a dried fruit note. Both were, as you said, very smooth to my admittedly untrained tequila palate.

BTW, the store I tasted them at prices the anejo at $44 and the other two a couple of dollars less. I didn't buy them, as that's the everyday price, but I'll likely pick up the reposado or anejo soon.

Virus_Of_Life
05-25-2007, 18:15
I picked up a bottle up the Herradurra Blanco 92 proof today, I'll report back after I give it a tasting.

bigtoys
05-28-2007, 22:18
My favorite: Don Julio 1942, a special edition anejo. Bought my first bottle at La Casa Del Tequila in Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco--the home state of tequila--before it was even available in the U.S. Each side of the bottle is shaped like an agave leaf, although I think I've seen some bottle recently that are the usual Don Julio shape labelled 1942--not as distinctive.

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i276/drkeng/1942.jpg

Another esoteric favorite is 1921 Reserva Especial.
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i276/drkeng/1921.jpg

Tried Tezon at Adobo Grill on Wells St. (Old Town next to Second City) and really liked it. Bought a bottle when I saw it at Binny's.

Sweetmeats
05-30-2007, 11:19
I picked up a bottle up the Herradurra Blanco 92 proof today, I'll report back after I give it a tasting.

And...did you taste it yet? I'm waiting. :)

gblick
07-02-2007, 23:54
Longtime tequila drinker here, though I've recently been converted over to drinking bourbon.

I'm no 'tequila afficianado' by any means, mainly because I prefer the extra aged anejos over the blancos that most true tequila afficianados seem to prefer (probably why I recently switched to bourbon).

My favorite tequilas are Jose Cuervo Reserva de la Familia (though the past couple of years have not been as good as say the 2004 which I consider one of the very best years), Jose Cuervo Anejo (no longer made but just as good as the Reserva de la Familia IMO, still have several bottles bunkered), El Tesoro Paradiso, Don Julio 1942, Tonala Reserva Suprema 4yr. Those are the more expensive ones.

My favorite mid-priced tequilas are El Tesoro (all of them but I mostly like the anejo), vintage 'green-labeled' Chinaco Anejo (I still have several bottles of this and have never actually tried any of the newer style bottle), Espolon, Gran Centenario, and El Jimador Anejo.

I'm terrible at tasting notes and picking out flavors and stuff. About all I can say is that I either like it or I don't.

But honestly, after I recently became hooked on good bourbon there may be no turning back for me (shhhh...don't tell the folks in the tequila forum, I feel like I've betrayed them), and my wallet prefers bourbon too.

Edit: Oh, how could I leave out Porfidio Single Barrel Anejo as one of my favorites, but it's been out of production for a good while (probably why I forgot about it). There are newer versions of it which didn't seem as good to me as the old original stuff, but some other people have said it is still as good as ever so what do I know.

And Sweetmeats, the Herradura Blanco 46 (92 proof) is good but it is pretty hot stuff.

Virus_Of_Life
07-03-2007, 18:43
And...did you taste it yet? I'm waiting. :)

Damn it Mark, I am so sorry! It is good, I am really not much for tasting notes, especially when it comes to tequila. I will say that for only being 12 proof higher there was some kind of a quicker kick to the blood stream or something. The nose on this was probably one of the best I have come across being very distinct citrus and pepper, all in all I'd have to say it is a very good drink. I have had it in shot form, as well as sipped with a squeeze of lime (a poor man's margarita) and it was super both ways. The bottle is over 1/2 gone so that should say something.

I don't work tomorrow so maybe I'll try some more specific notes tonight after taking a nap...

Sweetmeats
07-10-2007, 14:11
I suck at tasting notes too so no worries. I went to BevMo and bought myself a bottle as well. Wonderful stuff.

Any idea how Brown Forman buying Herradura will effect it here? This one was distributed by Sazerac. I hope Brown Forman doesn't change anything.

Vange
07-11-2007, 11:53
Any idea how Brown Forman buying Herradura will effect it here? This one was distributed by Sazerac. I hope Brown Forman doesn't change anything.

Me too, HSS is my favorite tequila!

Sweetmeats
07-11-2007, 14:56
Anyone tried those single village Mezcals? I'm thinking about trying one but 64 bucks is making me cringe.

Frodo
07-14-2007, 16:17
I've had the Chichicapa and the Minero. They are pricy, but they are worth it IMHO - especially the Minero! It helps if you like smokey flavours though. I wouldn't recommend someone buying it on a lark unless you have $$ to burn, but if you like the smokey taste of Mezcal, the Minero has a flavour profile clear as a bell (burnt lemon and honey) and powerful too. Helps that it's a bit overproof (for tequila/mezcal) at about 48% abv.

jbaker
02-10-2008, 00:19
I gotta say, I'm surprised slightly that no one has mentioned el Jimador Reposado yet. I can't say that it's particularly "interesting" in any technical sense, but damn if it doesn't do double-duty as both a great margarita tequila and a decent Tuesday night sip. It's not 100% de Agave, but for the same price as Cuervo Gold (or less in some instances) it's fantastic and a real reposado. #1 selling tequila in Mexico, I have on decent authority. I'm a believer. Did I mention that it's a Herradura product?

For the better stuff, I reach for Chinaco Anejo for woody moods. I recently bought Gran Centenario Anejo and was left somewhat disappointed. Not enough wood and conversely not enough agave flavor.

Any fantastic blanco/platino recommendations? I really want to try a white tequila that showcases the agave flavors.

Martian
02-12-2008, 05:09
Jeff, I would suggest going here for some blanco recommendations. http://www.tequila.net/
Steve

scratchline
02-22-2008, 13:00
Was on my out of the local liquor store when I noticed that the mini-bottles of Don Felipe Tesoro Tequila were on sale for a buck each. That's 15 bucks for a 750 bottle of 100% agave tequila! I had already paid so I told the girl I'd be back later. Drove a couple of miles and then u-turned. Just couldn't pass up a deal like that. Ended up with 3 for one: a bottle of silver, reposado, and anejo. And the 750 bottles were on the shelf at regular price. Go figure.

-Mike

jbaker
02-22-2008, 13:08
Was on my out of the local liquor store when I noticed that the mini-bottles of Don Felipe Tesoro Tequila were on sale for a buck each. That's 15 bucks for a 750 bottle of 100% agave tequila! I had already paid so I told the girl I'd be back later. Drove a couple of miles and then u-turned. Just couldn't pass up a deal like that. Ended up with 3 for one: a bottle of silver, reposado, and anejo. And the 750 bottles were on the shelf at regular price. Go figure.

-Mike

Sweet deal Mike! I've had that happen with Bulleit Frontier Bourbon at a local shop. 15 nips for $15 instead of the full 750mL bottle for $30!

New2Whiskey
02-23-2008, 07:23
Sweet deal Mike! I've had that happen with Bulleit Frontier Bourbon at a local shop. 15 nips for $15 instead of the full 750mL bottle for $30!

I have Tres Mujeres Reposado Tequila. That is my 1st purchase. Namely, because I found 'high ranking's on review sites and the fact that it can't be purchased just anywhere. But I'm not sold on it.

The Don Felipe Tesoro Tequilas I see from my research as being top of the line. I think I'm just going to spend some money and buy it. I'm tired of reading about it. I need to see if it lives up to the hype.

Virus_Of_Life
03-29-2008, 14:27
Mark, as for higher proof Tequilas I have long wanted some myself, the only one I know of is the Herradura Blano (not silver) which is 92proof. Bevmo does typically carry it, have not tried it myself, but am getting thirsty...

Bumping this thread with photos for Chuck.

You have to go into the Spanish version of their website and click Mexico for country and there it is. Maybe it is only sold here in California? As well as Mexico of course...

> And according to the website it is 45 days. Note the true Blanco is 92 proof.

chilidawg7
03-29-2008, 15:07
I would offer up Tres Generaciones Anejo, by Sauza.

It is, by far, my favorite tequila. I've got a mini-bottle collection (all empty of course) of 50+ bottles, as I wanted to sample many different varieties before settling on my go-to choice. Tres Generaciones won hands down.

Most restaurants carry it, including Chili's, which features it in its "Three G's Margarita."

bigtoys
03-29-2008, 15:25
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Tqall.jpg

Here's what I've returned from Mexico with. Almost got detained at the border coming into Texas, well at least sent to line #2 at the DFW Airport. You're only allowed 2 L; I had 3.75, but was willing to pay the duty on the excess. The Customs Official said the 2L rule is because they want you to buy your liquor in Texas (despite the fact that I was just passin' thru on my way to Chi-town) and they usually pour out the excess. I don't know if he was serious or just pulling my leg, but he let me through this time.

1921 Single Barrel Reposado Reserva Especial along with a 4 pack of mini's including their Tequila crema. I kind of wish I had got a few more of the mini's for gifts, but I knew I was gonna have enough trouble already with the Federales.
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/1921s.jpg

Esperanto Anejo. Aged 36 months. I admit, I got it a little for the cool bottle with the glass agave plant in the middle.
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Esperanto.jpg
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/36cl.jpg

Revolucion Anejo and some mini reposados. On the advice of my Mexican barber. On the back, there are lines. The website says it's so a bar can leave the bottle at a table and know how many shots were done. Very clever.
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Revs.jpg
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Revback.jpg

Comalteco Anejo. Tasted it in one of the many company stores around PV. Small bottle a gift.
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Comalteco.jpg

Here's the gecko that was in our shower on the last day:
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/gecko.jpg

cowdery
03-29-2008, 22:21
Bumping this thread with photos for Chuck.

You have to go into the Spanish version of their website and click Mexico for country and there it is. Maybe it is only sold here in California? As well as Mexico of course...

> And according to the website it is 45 days. Note the true Blanco is 92 proof.

My source is recent promotional material put out by Herradura's new owner, Brown-Forman. What I suspect is that they've been importing Mexican expressions into California primarily for Mexican consumers. BF is repositioning the brand for a more general, national distribution and isn't featuring, and perhaps isn't even offering, the blanco.

They have a similar situation with Appleton rum. Appleton makes, and sells in Jamaica, a very broad range of products, including an over-proof and a white rum, but only a smaller and more premium portfolio of products is being generally promoted in the U.S.

As for 40 v. 45 days, not much difference, so probably just some sloppiness on the part of either the brochure creators or the web site maker, though the web site hasn't been updated since the sale, so it's also possible the practice has changed, i.e., the brochures I have are more recent.

They are promoting el Jimador too, which is their value line, with a blanco, not a silver, so that does seem to be the distinction though, as I recall, it's not an official distinction recognized the the entity that governs tequila production. I think they use the terms white and silver synonymously.

Virus_Of_Life
03-30-2008, 00:09
White, Silver, Blanco, Plata and I've heard one more which I cannot recall now. Kind of makes you appreciate the more strict, yet not strict enough, bourbon industry.

Everything else aside I really hope they do not do away with either as I like them both and I hope there are not changes in quality with BF owning them!

Sweetmeats
04-01-2008, 15:41
Damn. The grocery store near me has a big sign "Close Out" on the 92 Proof Blanco. Time to stock up. The price isn't cheaper though.

gblick
04-01-2008, 23:31
There was a store where I got my Herradura Blanco 46 (the unaged 92 proof) that was selling it for $19.99. But when they ran out, within the last year, they never restocked it. Maybe they did quit distributing it to Texas, but there's still a lot of it around (but usually for >$30).

Speaking of the El Jimador blanco, I have a 1L bottle of it stated to be 100% agave. The present-day El Jimador blanco and reposado is mixto, but apparently there was a time when it was all 100% agave, or maybe they just made some batches that were 100%.

cowdery
04-02-2008, 19:56
Looking again at the recent sales brochures I have, the el Jimador Anjeo is 100% agave. The other expressions are not.

No tequila says "mixto" on the label. Basically, if it doesn't say "100% agave" on the label, it's mixto. El Jimador and others will even use the word "agave" several times on the label to trip you up, but if you don't see the words "100% agave" you can be pretty confident it is not.

gblick
04-03-2008, 12:05
Looking again at the recent sales brochures I have, the el Jimador Anjeo is 100% agave. The other expressions are not.

No tequila says "mixto" on the label. Basically, if it doesn't say "100% agave" on the label, it's mixto. El Jimador and others will even use the word "agave" several times on the label to trip you up, but if you don't see the words "100% agave" you can be pretty confident it is not.

Yeah, I'm pretty sure the anejo has always been 100% agave (when it first came out it was over $100 per bottle, too), but yes the blanco and reposado are now mixto (like I mentioned earlier, above).

True, it never says mixto on the label, you will know it by the absence of the term "100% agave". But, like I said, there was once 'some' 100% agave blaco and reposado in the El Jimador line. When I get time, I'll post a pic of my bottle.

Martian
04-05-2008, 14:07
In addition to Brown-Foreman, Heaven Hill is now in the tequila business. HH is now part owner of Tierra de Agaves that makes La Certeza and Lunazul.
Herradura Silver won a silver medal, Herradura Resposado won a gold medal, and the Herradura Anejo won a double gold Medal at the 2007 San Francisco World Spirits competition. La Certeza also won some medals. The Blanco won a bronze medal, Reposado won a silver medal, and the Anejo won a bronze.

bent
05-02-2008, 03:08
I am definitely not an expert on tequilas but I have tried many different bottles---el tesoro repasodo, el jimidor, cabo wabo, patron, etc.....my favorite so far has been Milagro Select Barrel Reposado Reserve. it is kinda pricey but for those who take it neat, I'm sure it will fit your tastes.

goldenwill
05-19-2008, 12:08
You should look for tequilas with 100% BLUE agave. Nobile is good, also Milagro. They are standouts because of the blue agave they use.

Frodo
05-19-2008, 23:15
You should look for tequilas with 100% BLUE agave. Nobile is good, also Milagro. They are standouts because of the blue agave they use.

FYI tequila can only be made with the Agave Weber (blue agave) variety. With Mixto tequila you can use up to 49% sugar/molasses but the agave content has to be (by law) exclusivly blue agave. This is in comparison to mezcal that can use several varieties of agave which give different flavours - kinda like using different grape varieties in winemaking.

I make no claims to know the rules for agave spirit made in places like South Africa that are sometimes called "tequila"...

ILLfarmboy
05-25-2008, 20:08
I'm sitting here with a glass (Riedel Bourbon) of my very first Tequila; Gran Centenario Plata (blanco). I wanted to try a quality blanco for my first because I want to get a feel for the spirit apart from any barrel notes before moving on to try an Anjeo. Wow! I'm realy digging this stuff. The nose isn't unlike many unaged spirits I have tried except it is less ethanol and slightly peppery and vegatal with an indefinable smokiness or perhaps the vegatal character combines with the pepperyness to give something like the impression of smokiness. That has to be it, right? It can't be smokey in the same way that scotch distilate is infused with peat smoke? The taste is an amped up representation of the nose. For a green unaged spitit it sure is flavorful. It has a nice finish, very peppery.

My original intent was, on the advice of an acquaintance, who knows my penchant for pairing whiskeys with food, was to pick up supper from town, fajitas Del Mar, from my wife's favorite Mexican restaurant, and after first sampling this Tequila by itself, to try it as an accompaniment to the food. Things didn't work out that way. But tomorrow is another day.

Edited to add: I just noticed while reading the back of the box that "Gran Centenario Plata rests in French Limousin Oak casks for 28 days....." So some blancos receive some aging? less than a month?

Virus_Of_Life
05-25-2008, 23:22
Edited to add: I just noticed while reading the back of the box that "Gran Centenario Plata rests in French Limousin Oak casks for 28 days....." So some blancos receive some aging? less than a month?

Glad you saw that Brad, I was going to point out that GC Plata was one of the few that does get some age. As pointed out I think previously in this thread Herradura is another that gets some age, but also has a 92 proof purely unaged silver.

Good choice with GC, I think the batches vary as I have had some bottles that were amazing and another that was merely good.

Schpyder
05-27-2008, 21:00
I'm sitting here with a glass (Riedel Bourbon) of my very first Tequila; Gran Centenario Plata (blanco). I wanted to try a quality blanco for my first because I want to get a feel for the spirit apart from any barrel notes before moving on to try an Anjeo. Wow! I'm realy digging this stuff. The nose isn't unlike many unaged spirits I have tried except it is less ethanol and slightly peppery and vegatal with an indefinable smokiness or perhaps the vegatal character combines with the pepperyness to give something like the impression of smokiness. That has to be it, right? It can't be smokey in the same way that scotch distilate is infused with peat smoke? The taste is an amped up representation of the nose. For a green unaged spitit it sure is flavorful. It has a nice finish, very peppery.

Hi Brad! Great choice, Gran Centenario's offerings are great across the board. You'll find most really good tequilas have that same vegetal characater that you pick up in the GC Plata, and it becomes more pronounced as the tequila gets older. As for the smoke, the piña (heart of the agave plant) is actually baked to hydrolize the sugars before milling to extract the juice. It can pick up a lot of flavor from this process, depending on the producer and how rustic they go with it.

If you want to try something on the opposite end of the spectrum, give an anejo a try, especially the GC, or Don Julio or Herradura.

Martian
05-29-2008, 15:16
The Herradura Anejo won the double gold medal at the 2007 San Francisco World Sprits Competiton. The reposado won a gold medal, and the silver won a silver medal. I really like the reposado but don't like the silver (blanco). Go figure.

Frodo
05-30-2008, 02:56
Not suprising if you are used to whisky. Reposado has some barrel age whereas the blanco may have up to 60 days in oak - no more.

bigtoys
07-13-2008, 18:38
Need to replace some basic Don Julio for margaritas. Checked Binny's and Sam's and found a couple of bucks difference. Was going up to Eagle River, WI and thought maybe I'd find a bargain. Unbelievably, it was about $10 more for the basics, but the 1942 was $99 at a grocery store--about $30 less than around here, so I got another bottle of that for the bunker. Guess I'll just get some blanco and reposado around here.

callmeox
07-13-2008, 21:27
When I went bourbon shopping in Myrtle Beach on vacation, one of the stores that we hit had a neat little Patron sampler "suitcase" with four 375's of Patron in it (silver, reposado, anejo and their XO Cafe liqueur) for what I thought was a reasonable price so I got it for my wife. She had already hit up the silver here at home, so she started with the anejo over some ice and she really liked it. I had been serving her the silver here at home on the rocks with a little squeeze of lime in it, but she said that the anejo was fine by itself on the rocks. Needless to say, the bottle came home empty.

I'll have to surprise her with a bottle of the anejo soon since it is such a great summer drink.

ACDetroit
08-04-2008, 19:37
On a hunt the other day, not sure why I was looking in the tequila area of the store but came across a bottle of Milagro Anejo for a mere $29 bucks plus tax. I did bring it home with me :grin::rolleyes:!

Tony

JamesW
08-21-2008, 18:33
I bought some Partida Anejo a few days back. Anyone like/dislike this one. I got some agave nectar with it and it makes for an excellent margarita. I don't like using a premium like the Anejo in a mixer so I'm looking for a blanco to use ... any suggestions on what should I get?

ACDetroit
08-21-2008, 19:29
James, IMO you can not go wrong with Milagro Blanco or (silver), there Anejo is one of my favorites. Good luck.

Tony

JamesW
08-21-2008, 20:32
James, IMO you can not go wrong with Milagro Blanco or (silver), there Anejo is one of my favorites. Good luck.

Tony

Thanks Tony, that's the push I needed. I saw the Milagro Silver won double gold at the SF Spirits championship and was thinking about pulling the trigger. At $30 it is priced right for a mixer. The Partida Anejo is really great but a bit pricey at $64 for a mixer - I'll drink that one neat once I get the Milagro.

Thanks again.

JamesW
08-22-2008, 09:57
Picked up the Milagro this morning. Looking forward to Margaritas this evening http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/icons/icon7.gif

CorvallisCracker
08-22-2008, 10:45
James, IMO you can not go wrong with Milagro Blanco or (silver), there Anejo is one of my favorites. Good luck.

Tony

I second Tony's recommendation for the Milagro Silver. It's usually $30 here, but the OLCC frequently runs a "monthly special" on it (3 of the last 4 months), pricing it at $26. We stock up.

JamesW
10-13-2008, 09:54
Last night I had EL Tesoro Reposado at a friends place and it was a very fine sipping Tequila. Also tried his Milagro and 1800 Reposados which didn't really compare. Came home and finished up with some ORVW 10/107.

cowdery
10-13-2008, 22:34
I've been enjoying some El Jimador Reposado, which is pretty tasty for $23.

El Jimador is Herradura's mixto brand.

New2Whiskey
10-20-2008, 08:31
Last night I had EL Tesoro Reposado at a friends place and it was a very fine sipping Tequila. Also tried his Milagro and 1800 Reposados which didn't really compare. Came home and finished up with some ORVW 10/107.

I also purchased El Tesoro Reposado as well as the Silver. I've only had 2 other tequilas. The El Tesoro Reposado was far better than the previous ones I owned.

I also used the Silver in making a margarita. I used a recipe from Robert Hess. (Not sure if its ok to post his website). I've made other margaritas before. But his ratio and the silver tequila from El Tesoro made a ridiculously great margarita!

Vange
10-20-2008, 09:43
I was recently at a wine tasting and one of the tables actually had spirits. The only bourbon was Knob Creek so I passed on it. They did offer El Tesoro's 70th anniversary 7 year extra aged anejo. Very light for a 7 year so I assume it was aged in used barrels. Very nice tasting, lots of vanilla and oak. Reminded me a lot of the DJ1942. Nice pour, but just not worth the price tag of $170. The regular El Tesoro anejo is my house pour for people wishing to explore and try a good tequila.

whskylvr
10-20-2008, 13:40
Hello All,

Another 100 proof tequila is Don Fulano Blanco Fuerte. Available in 80 or 100 proof, hand blown bottle and 100% Agave. I have enclosed a picture of the bottle.

Another great tequila if you like the woody ones is Chinaco Negro Extra Anejo. The whole Chinaco line is a spicy style of Tequila compared to most others.

I also enjoy the El Tesoro line. I tend to prefer silvers/blancos because they tend to show their earthy notes more. NO WOOD influence. I always have DJ1942 in the house, along with Chinaco, El Tesoro, and the Espolon Reposado.

Dave

Vange
10-20-2008, 13:45
I am definitely an anejo guy. I do like rposado or blanco in a nice homemade margarita, but not for sipping. I have tried them I just seem to prefer a more mellow and oaky tequila.

With that said, I have and half finished my bottle of Chinaco Emperador. I think its good, but a ridiculous price tag for its contents. I have a Chinaco Negro Extra anejo unopened. Ill get to it eventually. ET is one of my favorite lines with Paradiso being the star. I love that tequila although it seems the earlier bottlings are much better than the new wax dipped bottles. Had the Espolon anejo and enjoyed it. Good for the $$.

whskylvr
10-20-2008, 15:58
To big of a rush. Here is the picture of Don Fulano.

gblick
10-22-2008, 13:21
I was in a store today and noticed that the new shipments of El Jimador blanco/reposado are back to 100% agave. The new bottle shape is taller and slimmer. I still have an unopened liter bottle of their 100% agave blanco from years ago.

Frodo
10-23-2008, 18:36
I was in a store today and noticed that the new shipments of El Jimador blanco/reposado are back to 100% agave.

That's really good news!!!

Vange
10-24-2008, 07:48
I was in a store today and noticed that the new shipments of El Jimador blanco/reposado are back to 100% agave. The new bottle shape is taller and slimmer. I still have an unopened liter bottle of their 100% agave blanco from years ago.

It could be good news. I am in the process of compiling a list of tequilas that were once great and where the latest production pales in comparison to the original juice.

gblick you can find that list on the tequila forum as I noticed you are a member of both forums.

Virus_Of_Life
10-25-2008, 17:32
Very light for a 7 year so I assume it was aged in used barrels.

Aren't all tequilas aged in used barrels? Hence the almost Scotch like character some of the extra anejos get. That's definitely the impression I've always had.

On the subject of 100 proofers, 1800 (Cuervo) has a new Silver that is 100 proof and it is pretty damn good! I really like the higher proof tequilas I think you get more flavor and hope to keep seeing more and more introduced. I'll have to look for this Don Fulano, good to see it is 100% agave, anything that isn't does not come home with me!

cowdery
10-25-2008, 17:43
I was in a store today and noticed that the new shipments of El Jimador blanco/reposado are back to 100% agave. The new bottle shape is taller and slimmer. I still have an unopened liter bottle of their 100% agave blanco from years ago.

I'm surprised by this. The bottle I bought a couple of weeks ago is not 100% agave. It's also quite tasty. I'm not sure why they would do that. The bottle I have does identify it as a Casa Herradura product, distributed by Brown-Forman. If El Jimador is 100% agave, then why spend twice as much for Herradura?

By the way, the El Jimador Reposado has been going fast at Casa Cowdery, and I rarely reach for anything except bourbon.

Frodo
10-25-2008, 19:31
I'm surprised by this. The bottle I bought a couple of weeks ago is not 100% agave. It's also quite tasty. I'm not sure why they would do that. The bottle I have does identify it as a Casa Herradura product, distributed by Brown-Forman. If El Jimador is 100% agave, then why spend twice as much for Herradura?

I'm not sure what the difference is between the brands except quality and price. The quality difference is well known at Mumpsimous forum. Cut points in the distillation process? Wood policy? I can a radical difference between the two. Herradura is the better brand by a country mile IMHO.

El Jimador used to be 100% agave before there was some sort of agave shortage. Perhaps now that production has caught up, the brand has gone back to being 100% agave?

cowdery
10-26-2008, 19:17
It may be a Canada thing, but I'll be on the look-out here. I know the Herradura reposado and anjeo are aged longer than the Il Jimador equivalents, but it's hard to guess what "quality" differences there could be since it's produced at the same distillery. The only way to make it cheaper is to make it mixto.

JamesW
10-27-2008, 20:29
I also purchased El Tesoro Reposado as well as the Silver. I've only had 2 other tequilas. The El Tesoro Reposado was far better than the previous ones I owned.

I also used the Silver in making a margarita. I used a recipe from Robert Hess. (Not sure if its ok to post his website). I've made other margaritas before. But his ratio and the silver tequila from El Tesoro made a ridiculously great margarita!

I make my Margarita's using Partida's Agave nectar for sweetness. I follow the recipe on the bottle and it is quite good.

Tonight I enjoyed some Partida Anejo neat which is always smooth and quite enjoyable.

whskylvr
10-29-2008, 12:40
El Jimador vs Herradura

*El jimador is a mixto but they also offer 100% Agave!!

Below I have outlined some differences in El Jimador (Mixto) vs Herradura

FERMENTATION
EJ is for 72 hours vs H fermented at 96 hours

DISTILLATION
EJ lasts 5 hours vs Herradura at 6 hours

After the 2nd distillation Herradura is 46%abv (92 proof)
After the 2nd distillation El jimador is 48%abv (96 proof)

AGING
Herradura silver aged 45 days / Reposado aged 11 months
El jimador blanco unaged / Reposado aged 2 months

One of the bigger factors is the Agave Terrior (where it is from which region valley vs Mountains) this really influence the flavor profile.

ILLfarmboy
12-10-2008, 18:51
Well, I finally bought another tequila today. After reading many reviews on Tequila.net I decided to go with Gran Centenario Reposado.

I picked up a replacement bottle of their Plata so I'm sitting here with a glass of each. Aside from a fleeting vanilla that melds well with the 'pepper' and a smoothing of the edges the two iterations are, to my inexperienced 'tequila palate', identical, which is what I was hoping for. I love the agave taste. I wouldn't want that covered up. I can't make up my mind which one I like better.

I was almost persuaded to buy a bottle of the Herradura Reposado when I saw a Christmas gift pack that included a glass. I think I'll head out to a Mexican restaurant within the next few days and try a pour before buying a bottle.

Gillman
12-10-2008, 19:56
This thread has prompted me to taste some tequila, something I do only rarely.

I poured some 4 Copas Blanco in my Whiskey Keller Bourbon Street glass (a copita-style glass and I can't recall now where I got this, I think it was at a whisky festival). I added a large cube of ice.

The taste was quite strong at first (I am not used to tequila) but now I can see its allure, the taste is complex, sweetish, with grassy and herbal notes, pepper too.

Gary

Hondo
12-13-2008, 16:10
I spend some time reading through this thread and have enjoyed it.

I know almost nothing about Tequila however did have some interesting experiences in Mexico years ago when I used to travel there for business.

Some of the mexican businessmen used to poke some fun at me since a lot of gringo's are known to knock back shots of Jose Cuervo. First off I found that Cuervo is not too well regarded in Mexico and secondly that Tequila should be sipped not tossed back as you sometimes see in the states.

I did manage to sip a variety of nice Tequilas while I was there and recall that I especially liked Don Julio. I first had Don Julio while dining at El Gaucho which is an Argentine Steak House and is amazing by the way. The Don Julio is served chilled in a tall shot glass. Along with it they serve Sangrita to sip along with the Tequila. It was very good... matter of fact, I may pick up a bottle and give it another go.

ILLfarmboy
12-28-2008, 23:07
After about the forth or Fifth uncorking of this bottle of El Tesoro Platinum (blanco) The synthetic cork came unglued from the wooden top. I had a hell of a time getting the rubber stopper out.

The stopper fit so snugly the bottle would jerk when I pulled it out. I use to think that synthetic corks for spirits were a good Idea, but if they have to be made this snug maybe it isn't such a good Idea. Synthetic corks on a wine bottle only have to come out once.......but a bottle of spirits....



I'm liking screw caps more and more these days............

JamesW
01-02-2009, 21:32
This thread has prompted me to taste some tequila, something I do only rarely.

I poured some 4 Copas Blanco in my Whiskey Keller Bourbon Street glass (a copita-style glass and I can't recall now where I got this, I think it was at a whisky festival). I added a large cube of ice.

The taste was quite strong at first (I am not used to tequila) but now I can see its allure, the taste is complex, sweetish, with grassy and herbal notes, pepper too.

Gary

I had that 4 Copas Blanco this summer and it was excellent.... it was the Tequila that opened my eyes to how good a Tequila could be.


Tonight I'm enjoying some Partida Anejo after a bunch of Islay Scotches...

ILLfarmboy
01-03-2009, 00:46
James, How do the 4 Copas offerings compare to El Tesoro?

Since buying a bottle of El Tesoro repasado and a bottle of the blanco the Gran Centenario tequilas taste sweet, too sweet, even the blanco. My wife even commented on how sweet the GC blanco tasted when I gave her a sip of the El Tesoro and then had her try the GC. A few days ago she even requested that I make our Margaritas with the ET platinum. We've never made them at home and I can't recall having one in a restaurant. I used a 2:1:1 ratio. I had mine straight up and she had hers on the rocks. I liked it, but she thought they were a bit too strong with tequila. She liked it better after the ice melted some. I plan on experimenting further when we have tacos for supper again.

JamesW
01-05-2009, 16:39
James, How do the 4 Copas offerings compare to El Tesoro?

Since buying a bottle of El Tesoro repasado and a bottle of the blanco the Gran Centenario tequilas taste sweet, too sweet, even the blanco. My wife even commented on how sweet the GC blanco tasted when I gave her a sip of the El Tesoro and then had her try the GC. A few days ago she even requested that I make our Margaritas with the ET platinum. We've never made them at home and I can't recall having one in a restaurant. I used a 2:1:1 ratio. I had mine straight up and she had hers on the rocks. I liked it, but she thought they were a bit too strong with tequila. She liked it better after the ice melted some. I plan on experimenting further when we have tacos for supper again.

ILLfarmboy, I can't recall the 4 Copas well enough to make an honest comparison. As it was the first tequila that I've had that didn't taste like rot-gut so I was obviously impressed. It got me to go out and try all these others since then. The 4 Copas was not available in my area so I haven't had the opportunity to try it again. I just remember it having a citrus flavor and not being too sweet for sure.

If I ever have the pleasure again I'll report back the new findings.

Cheers!

JamesW
01-05-2009, 20:37
Enjoying some of that Partida Anejo tonight.

ddubb
07-15-2009, 03:12
Here's a couple questions.

Definitions and preparation aside, only referring to taste, what's the general difference between anejo and resposado? Especially if you compare the two styles within one brand head to head.

Second question: more specifically, what about Herradura Anejo vs Herradura Resposado?

Here's my very extremely limited experience with better tequilas. I was introduced to Chinaco, my first 'sipping' tequila. I've tried a few other brown ones, sorta recall the brands, but I didn't know to pay attention to the rest of the title.

In general always preferred the brown ones vs blanco or silver. Although I have had at least one blanco that I really liked. But all my trials were in bars, many years ago, can't remember all I've had.

So recently I was in a liquor store, trying to decide on a brown tequila. I was flying blind, I hadn't done a bit of research. Generally I don't like putting money down without spending at least a few minutes googling a couple reviews.

Based on a neck tag bragging about some awards, I settled on something I had never tried up to that point: Herradura Anejo. I can't imagine tequila being better than this.

I've noticed that with rum I tend to prefer anejo rums. I'm really curious about Herradura Resposado as compared to Herradura Anejo.

Vange
07-15-2009, 07:27
OK here is the lowdown woith definitions and then Ill get into taste.

Blanco - unaged tequila normally clear
Reposado - up to 1 year of barrel aging
Anejo - 1-3 yea barrel aging
Extra Anejo - 3+ years of barrel aging

It seems you prefer anejos (like me) as they are more mellow and I think have more characteristics than unaged (blanco) tequila. IMO reposados are the best for margaritas though. So, the difference between Herradura anejo and reposado is just time spent in barrel which makes the anejo type taste more mellow and "smoother".


If you liked Herradura anjeo then Herradura Sellecion Suprema Extra anejo (HSS) would blow you away!

Other good ones out there.

"Affordable":
El Tesoro anejo - this started my lovefest with tequila $40-50
Tonala Suprema Reserva - $40

More luxury:
Don Julio 1942 - $80ish
El Tesoro Paradiso - $100ish
HSS - $300ish
Don Fulano Imperial - $100ish

Vange
07-15-2009, 07:35
I used to always recommend JCRF (Jose Cuervo Reserva de la Familia) which is a tequila that comes out each year with a newly designed box by some artist. The 04s were amazing and most of the releases since its inception in 1995 were amazing. Since 04 the 05, 06, 07, and 08 are just not even close to 04 and and earlier vintages. The 09 has some promise and I am awaiting a sample before I buy it. I just wanted to add that as it seems to be a tequila that is becmiing more readily available. Price is around 80-100. It used to be the ONLY Cuervo product worth buying (barring the 1800 Collecion which is in the 1000s), but I wouldnt bother until they release a worthy vintage OR you get an 04.

Thankfully, I have 4-5 bottles of the 04 bunkered. I am hoping JC will turn it around, but they are probably too big to care.

gblick
07-16-2009, 13:14
I used to always recommend JCRF (Jose Cuervo Reserva de la Familia) which is a tequila that comes out each year with a newly designed box by some artist. The 04s were amazing and most of the releases since its inception in 1995 were amazing. Since 04 the 05, 06, 07, and 08 are just not even close to 04 and and earlier vintages. The 09 has some promise and I am awaiting a sample before I buy it. I just wanted to add that as it seems to be a tequila that is becmiing more readily available. Price is around 80-100. It used to be the ONLY Cuervo product worth buying (barring the 1800 Collecion which is in the 1000s), but I wouldnt bother until they release a worthy vintage OR you get an 04.

Thankfully, I have 4-5 bottles of the 04 bunkered. I am hoping JC will turn it around, but they are probably too big to care.I disagree about it being the ONLY Cuervo product worth buying (barring the 1800 Collecion). I thought the Jose Cuervo Anejo was excellent, IMO just as good as any JCRF and only half the cost. But that's just my opinion, I know many on the tequila forums don't agree. And of course the Jose Cuervo Anejo is no longer sold and very hard to find, so I guess it's not very relevant, but I wanted to mention it.

Vange
07-16-2009, 13:31
I would also agree JCA is another quality Cuervo product, but as you mentioned no longer available. Rumor has it is similar to JCRF in its heyday.

smokinjoe
07-16-2009, 14:34
For our annual Cinco de Mayo party, I always pick up a couple good Anejo's or Reposado's for drinking as a toast later in the evening. One of the bottles this year, was 1921 Reserva Especial. It has many bourbon qualities to it. Kinda mapley, caramelly. It was fantastic. To date, this is the best tequila I've ever tasted. :yum:

DeanSheen
07-16-2009, 14:43
What no love for the Don Julio Anejo?

I used to be an avid Tequila drinker. Part of the reason I got out of it was that most bottles I liked suddenly jumped up into the $50 range.

I prefer Blanco's and Reposado's now as I find most Anejo's unsuited to my palette for anything other than an after dinner drink.

I think Milagro Reposado isn't a bad deal here @ $33 and goes great with beer!

cowdery
07-16-2009, 20:24
Anejo is just woodier and I usually prefer a reposado. Herradura is one of my favorites and I prefer the reposado there. I haven't sampled a lot of other lines comparing the different styles in the line, so maybe with other brands I would prefer the anejo. I also like Hornitos, which is the reposado version of Sauza, and El Jimador Reposado, which is Herradura's value brand. If I want to try a new tequila, I usually start with the reposado. It's a very personal preference thing, so your results may vary.

ILLfarmboy
07-16-2009, 22:24
Anejo is just woodier and I usually prefer a reposado. Herradura is one of my favorites and I prefer the reposado there. I haven't sampled a lot of other lines comparing the different styles in the line, so maybe with other brands I would prefer the anejo. I also like Hornitos, which is the reposado version of Sauza, and El Jimador Reposado, which is Herradura's value brand. If I want to try a new tequila, I usually start with the reposado. It's a very personal preference thing, so your results may vary.


Largely because of your stated preference for Hurradura reposado, I've given that one a try. I like it. it is probably my favorite reposado. For pure fresh agava flavor I love El Tosoro Platnum. Oddly, I'm not nearly as big a fan of their reposado.

wadewood
07-17-2009, 15:23
I have a few bottles of the El Tessoro Platinum (Blanco) that are the older bottlings (different bottle/label). It states that is distilled to 80 proof, which means no water added. I love this stuff, can really taste the agave.

ILLfarmboy
07-17-2009, 17:36
I have a few bottles of the El Tessoro Platinum (Blanco) that are the older bottlings (different bottle/label). It states that is distilled to 80 proof, which means no water added. I love this stuff, can really taste the agave.


All of my bottles have been the newer "olive oil bottle" shape, But I think it is still distilled to proof. Their web site features the newer bottles but still claims that it is "double distilled to exactly 80 proof".

Every time I buy a bottle I'm glad I'm patronizing a product that uses a low distillation proof.

gblick
07-18-2009, 13:02
When I was a tequila drinker, El Tesoro was one of my very favorites. When they changed the bottle, I still always sought out the old-style bottles, as they were still easy to find around here. Those old bottles are much harder to find now, but they are still out there.

wadewood
07-18-2009, 14:08
When I was a tequila drinker, El Tesoro was one of my very favorites. When they changed the bottle, I still always sought out the old-style bottles, as they were still easy to find around here. Those old bottles are much harder to find now, but they are still out there.

Are you sure Gus? I been snagging them up:rolleyes:

gblick
07-19-2009, 14:07
Are you sure Gus? I been snagging them up:rolleyes:I'll keep an eye out for them for you.

ddubb
07-20-2009, 02:07
One thing that impressed me during my first exposure to Herradura Anejo was that the distinct "tequila-ness", that flavor that makes tequila what it is, was very subdued. There were many layers of flavor; fibery, silky, woody, etc, and the "tequila" flavor was just a hint among other flavors.

If nothing else, it was just impressive and unexpected that the distinct tequila-ness could be just a bit actor. Now as I work my way through the bottle, I find myself wishing for just a hint more of that tequila flavor. Not that this is even a criticism.

It seems that this anejo and I'm sure many others are probably a good first choice to offer to someone uninitiated or skeptical of the idea that tequila, with all its baggage, can be sipped as is scotch or brandy.

On the other end of the spectrum I did try some white tequila that I got for my wife when she wanted some margaritas. I found Hornitos Plata quite sip-worthy. Maybe not quite where I'm at right now, but the smoothness and quality were definitely there.

I think I can relate to others here who have settled on Resposados. I like cowdery's approach: when trying a new brand, to start out with the Resposado. That's where I'm headed next.

Martian
08-21-2009, 10:41
I'm always looking for good value brands of my favorite spirit. The best one I've found so far is Lunazul (owned by Heaven Hill). Both the reposado and blanco won silver medals at the 2009 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.
Give them try.

miller542
08-24-2009, 17:12
I'm always looking for good value brands of my favorite spirit. The best one I've found so far is Lunazul (owned by Heaven Hill). Both the reposado and blanco won silver medals at the 2009 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.
Give them try.

2nd that, was looking for something on the less expensive side but still 100% agave, settled on Lanazul reposado and was plesantly surprised.

unclebunk
08-26-2009, 09:18
Okay. I've got a small stash of reposados now--Cazadores, El Jimador (good and inexpensive!), Sauza Hornitos and my favorite, Herradura, which a Mexican friend brought back for me on his last trip home. I'm still eyeing the El Tesoro Reposado which should pretty much satisfy my needs in terms of reposados.

So here's my question: I still need one affordable blanco (or silver) for that down-home traditional tequila flavor (but something that doesn't put me into rot-gut territory) and one not-too-expensive but premium quality anejo. I like true agave flavor and realize that that can sometimes get lost in some anejos due to the pronounced presence of oak imparted by lengthier barrel ageing, but I want to cover the whole spectrum in my tiny collection of tequila and feel I should have at least one anejo on the bar. My Mexican friend recommends the Herradura Anejo at about $50 or possibly the El Tesoro at a similar price. As to the blanco, I do not intend to ever drink it in a mixer so I want something tasty to sip straight up. Any suggestions, folks?

fuzz
08-26-2009, 18:50
2nd that, was looking for something on the less expensive side but still 100% agave, settled on Lanazul reposado and was plesantly surprised.

3rd that. I don't think I'd enjoy sipping Lanazul, but I'm enjoying the blanco in a margarita as I type. It's the only 100% agave tequila on the shelves here in NC that's under $20. The repo is currently on sale for $16.95! For the money, I'm not sure how you'd beat this for margaritas.

I like to start the night with a single margarita, rinse with a cup of water, and then start sipping on the more expensive juice!

Martian
08-29-2009, 14:13
unclebunk, you can't go wrong by just staying within the El Tesoro lineup. The El Tesoro Platinum was awarded the Best Tequila and a Double Gold medal at the 2009 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. The reposado and anejo were also awarded Double Golds. All are also reasonably priced and usually priced less than Herradura.

ILLfarmboy
08-29-2009, 15:26
unclebunk, you can't go wrong by just staying within the El Tesoro lineup. The El Tesoro Platinum was awarded the Best Tequila and a Double Gold medal at the 2009 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. The reposado and anejo were also awarded Double Golds. All are also reasonably priced and usually priced less than Herradura.

Around here the best liquor stores are usually the Hy-Vee Wine and Spirits. For some bizarre reason they have the El Tosoro Platinum priced the same as the anejo, 52 dollars. The entire El Tosoro line up is priced identical. I don't know what other people pay for the anejo but the Blanco should be around 36-38 dollars. I pay about that down in Peoria at Friar Tucks Beverage.

I wonder what gives. I was thinking the El Tosoro line was sort of like Highland Park 12, big variation in price depending on your location and the individual store.

unclebunk
08-29-2009, 16:14
unclebunk, you can't go wrong by just staying within the El Tesoro lineup. The El Tesoro Platinum was awarded the Best Tequila and a Double Gold medal at the 2009 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. The reposado and anejo were also awarded Double Golds. All are also reasonably priced and usually priced less than Herradura.

Thanks for the advice. My Mexican friend said the same thing about the El Tesoro Platinum being an excellent blanco. I've been looking for the reposado and anejo in the older non-olive oil style bottles but haven't had any luck finding them. I guess they're long gone now but I liked the more "traditional" look of them.

unclebunk
08-29-2009, 16:33
...they have the El Tosoro Platinum priced the same as the anejo, 52 dollars. The entire El Tosoro line up is priced identical. I don't know what other people pay for the anejo but the Blanco should be around 36-38 dollars. I pay about that down in Peoria at Friar Tucks Beverage. I wonder what gives. I was thinking the El Tosoro line was sort of like Highland Park 12, big variation in price depending on your location and the individual store.

I just checked the Binny's on-line prices and the El Tesoro Anejo was $50 and the Reposado was $45. Oddly, the Platinum wasn't even listed. But I agree, the blanco/silver/platinum should be no more than upper $30's if the others are priced in the $45-$50 range. I'm sure all of the El Tesoro products are of excellent quality (like the Herradura line too) but I'm not quite that enamoured with tequila to spend upwards of $40 too many times. I'll be happy to have a few bottles on the bar at that price for those occasions when I want a real quality tequila, but when I'm spending that kind of dough I'm going to head for a Pappy 15 or another killer bourbon more often than not.

ddubb
08-31-2009, 00:49
I forgot to thank Vange for his little list of tequila types. It actually came in very useful for me.

In another thread I was complaining about most of my liquor having a smell that's similar to fingernail polish. Others referred to it as an "acetone" smell. It goes away when I let the drink aerate for a while before drinking.

I've noticed that the Herradura Anejo doesn't have that smell at all.

But more than this, there is another reason I love the Herradura. Long before I noticed that Herradura lacks this acetone smell, I noticed that I feel much better the morning after drinking Herradura, compared to how I feel after drinking anything else.

As a matter of fact, sometimes I feel better the day after Herradura, than I would've felt had I abstained from drink. I know of many who would be skeptical of this. I became intentionally skeptical myself, just so I wasn't unintentionally creating a psychosomatic effect; wishfully thinking myself into thinking I was feeling better; psyching myself into thinking my favorite drink is actually good for me.

I guess anyone else skeptical of my claim could come up with another explanation. For example, maybe I just sleep lightly in general, but on a night when I sip alcohol I achieve a deeper level of sleep. In fairness there may be something to that.

But there's something singularly unique about Herradura. It really acts like a medicinal tonic for me. There have been instances where I was having some minor (very minor) health things going on. A bout of hay fever, a canker sore outbreak, lower back goes out of whack, common cold, etc. Things that, once they hit me, usually take a few days to run their course.

You know how you can usually gauge your health, and if you got something minor like that, you can make a good guess about your expectation that the condition may linger for a day or three before its completely gone.

Some may think I'm crazy, but in many cases, drinking Herradura has been a bit like finding the correct herbal tea for what's been bugging me. The morning after having a bit the night before, I wake up feeling much better than expetcted; that is, healed up quicker and more completely than expected. I guess a good analogy is that it seem to live up to the claims made about menudo.

unclebunk
09-01-2009, 09:21
But there's something singularly unique about Herradura. It really acts like a medicinal tonic for me. Some may think I'm crazy, but in many cases, drinking Herradura has been a bit like finding the correct herbal tea for what's been bugging me. The morning after having a bit the night before, I wake up feeling much better than expetcted; that is, healed up quicker and more completely than expected. I guess a good analogy is that it seem to live up to the claims made about menudo.

Ooh. I like that. A spirit that is actually good for you! I have no doubt that some drinks may have this type of positive effect on people. I know that alcohol is a stimulant, but when I'm suffering from a head cold and experiencing one bad night's sleep after another, a small glass of scotch or Elmer T. Lee not only buys me some much needed slumber but it actually seems to clear my congestion a bit. I'll have to try it with the Herradura next time. But you can keep the menudo. I hate the stuff! :grin:

unclebunk
09-01-2009, 09:36
I've been meaning to ask. Has anyone tried the Corralejo line of tequila? I've been seeing it around a lot more lately and I'm intrigued. Their bottles are really attractive and the line is priced quite nicely as well (usually in the upper $20's or low $30's depending upon the retailer and sales that may take place).

Frodo
09-03-2009, 13:25
I've tried the Repo, Repo tripple distilled, and Anejo. Myt thoughts are that the brand has a strong peppery taste and tends to be light on the oak at each aging point tending to accentuated the agave.

unclebunk
09-03-2009, 14:43
Enjoyed some Cazadores Anejo last night. Sweeter than the Herradura Anejo and a bit silkier in texture but still enough agave shining through the oak. Nice bottle too!

ILLfarmboy
09-04-2009, 19:29
I've tried the Repo, Repo tripple distilled, and Anejo. Myt thoughts are that the brand has a strong peppery taste and tends to be light on the oak at each aging point tending to accentuated the agave.


I've wondered how a triple distilled product can do that. I've heard a lot of good things about the Casa Noble line but shied away from trying it since it is triple distilled.

Any Idea what the final proof off the still is?

Martian
09-14-2009, 13:15
I tried the Corralejo Repo and liked it, but I prefer Herradura and even Lunazul to it.

Frodo
09-15-2009, 11:08
I've wondered how a triple distilled product can do that. I've heard a lot of good things about the Casa Noble line but shied away from trying it since it is triple distilled.

Any Idea what the final proof off the still is?

Not sure about the proof off the still, but Casa Noble is probably the best tasting brand of Tequila I've tried.

PAspirit1
01-17-2010, 14:38
I got back recently from an 9 day stay in Michoacan, Mexico. Our hosts did all of the buying and I just went with the flow. The tequila for the first 7 days was mixer quality to me. I think El Compadre was one. On the first night I told our host that I don't usually mix spirits and I tried to muscle down a "limpia" - neat pour. Very rough. I was mixing my a## off after that and drinking "Jarritos Locos."

On the second to last night a 1800 Reposada appeared and I couldn't get enough. I seem to remember a sort of cherry flavor. The last day was 1800 Anejo and I was loving that as well. It seemed very complex. With 7 days of the rough stuff, these two were set up pretty well to be appreciated. I looked on one website and the reviews seemed so-so but I know I enjoyed both immensely. I will be buying one of these soon.

SMOWK
01-17-2010, 16:04
I got back recently from an 9 day stay in Michoacan, Mexico. Our hosts did all of the buying and I just went with the flow. The tequila for the first 7 days was mixer quality to me. I think El Compadre was one. On the first night I told our host that I don't usually mix spirits and I tried to muscle down a "limpia" - neat pour. Very rough. I was mixing my a## off after that and drinking "Jarritos Locos."

On the second to last night a 1800 Reposada appeared and I couldn't get enough. I seem to remember a sort of cherry flavor. The last day was 1800 Anejo and I was loving that as well. It seemed very complex. With 7 days of the rough stuff, these two were set up pretty well to be appreciated. I looked on one website and the reviews seemed so-so but I know I enjoyed both immensely. I will be buying one of these soon.

Whenever I drink tequila it's usually for one reason, to get really really drunk. I find tequila gives me a "crazy" high that's very uppity. A party drink. I most always do shots with lime and salt, and usually can take down a whole bottle in one sitting. Although I usually regret it, somewhat. Since the sole purpose is to get drunk, and I'm doing shots, I've found that blanco is my favorite. And it's cheaper.

1800 was always my favorite until I started making my way around the tequila aisle a little more. I've bought a few top shelf tequilas, but I've never been impressed. To date, my 3 favorite blancos are 1800, Cazadores, and Cuervo Platino. The store nearby was selling the Platino for 30 bucks a bottle for a while. It must've been mis-priced or something because the price shot up to 60 after I bought most of them over a few months.

Ya know, I haven't had a bottle of tequila in a while. If I get arrested, I blame this thread...

Lost Pollito
01-17-2010, 16:47
I gotta say, Siete Leguas is my favorite still. Loads, and loads of fruit with terrific spice from the agave. Hand-picked agave's from Los Altos sure make for tons of flavor.:grin:

Gillman
01-17-2010, 16:51
(This must be a contender for oldest active SB thread, being about 5 1/2 years old).

Tequila and cognac are spirits I have never quite come to terms with. Their flavor is very pronounced, and unique, and either you like them or you don't. Sure there are different qualities, but still.

Anyway not long ago some friends gave me a half-bottle of Tequila Maya Reposado. It has their picture on it, they bought it from a shop where their picture was taken to put on the bottle.

I wasn't expecting anything special but this truly is a fine drink, the best tequila I have ever had. It has a typical pepper-like nose but a very soft palate with no burn at all. It's all in Spanish on the label and I can't tell who makes it. You can taste all the tequila flavours but nicely tamed with oak aging and no artificial sweetness evidently. It's an agave, from I think (again the label) Gapillade Gaudalupe, not sure if that is a locality or distillery. I would buy this definitely, a fine spirit indeed.

Gary

Gillman
01-17-2010, 16:59
Actually on the back of the Tequila Maya Reposado it states: "Triangulo Dorada Region De Los Altos", with Gapilla de Guadalupe shown in the triangle near the center, so I gather this is a good indicator. Certainly the taste shows it.

Gary

Gillman
01-17-2010, 17:09
Sorry for the, um, articulated posts, but it is taking me time to understand the label. In the centre on the back it states "5 Anos", so I gather 5 years old. I think this is unusually long for reposado, but if so it suits the spirit very well, softening it down but preserving all the flavor. Ole!

Gary

ILLfarmboy
01-17-2010, 18:40
(
I wasn't expecting anything special but this truly is a fine drink, the best tequila I have ever had. It has a typical pepper-like nose but a very soft palate with no burn at all. It's all in Spanish on the label and I can't tell who makes it.

I think all bottles of tequila have something called a NOM number by which you an trace its provenience. Not sure though.....

PAspirit1
01-17-2010, 19:19
Tequila and cognac are spirits I have never quite come to terms with. Their flavor is very pronounced, and unique, and either you like them or you don't. Sure there are different qualities, but still.



I'm with you on the cognac or brandy. It is hard for me stomach it. Vodka is worse to me though - it turns my stomach.

Gillman
01-17-2010, 19:35
Well, these are acquired tastes and in general I find I cannot acquire them, but as with many things there are exceptions. I can see developing a taste for good reposado. Ive been reading up on tequila and most "repos" seem aged from a couple of months to about a year - perhaps I misread the 5 on mine and it wasn't aged 5 years (which seems too long I think for most brands anyway). However they made it, I like it!

Gary

bpt
01-18-2010, 18:51
The newest category in Tequila is Extra Anejo and (I believe) these are aged 3 years or more. Reposado can go up to just under a year and then it becomes anejo. Maybe the "5 anos" is referring to something else?

Gillman
01-18-2010, 19:02
Probably, it says Reposado on the front, and 5 anos in the center of the label on the back, so it must refer to something else, maybe the number of years the Los Altos region has been recognized as a special tequila area, you can read it that way. I'll have to try some other aged types of tequila. It makes sense to me that some time will improve it but you don't want its essential quality overwhelmed by barrel qualities and I like the balance the Tequila Maya gets, it is both bland and tasty at the same time if that makes sense.

Gary

Vange
01-19-2010, 12:39
Maybe the 5 anos refers to the age of the blue agave plant before being harvested? I am not sure, but reposados are by Mexican law less than a year aged in barrel.

As for 1800, there are a handful of 1800s (the crap mixto, Milenio, Coleccion, anejo) Unfortunately, most tequila sold is mixto (51% blue agave and the rest cheap fillers) and those are harsh and are what give tequila its bad name. My analogy is mixto is like JD.

If you want a nice drink on par with other fine spirits the anejo or extra anejos (3+) of 100% blue agave are the way to go. The prices are rising though as good tequila gets more popular.

If you really want to get a good feel for them, grab 4 bottles (5 if you got the $$). mixto, blanco, reposado, anejo, extra anejo.

emr454
01-19-2010, 14:49
I saw it mentioned earlier in this thread, but does anyone else have opinions of Lanazul reposado?

Eric

Lost Pollito
01-19-2010, 15:28
I saw it mentioned earlier in this thread, but does anyone else have opinions of Lanazul reposado?

Eric
I loved it for the price. I got a btl at $16 some time ago...maybe 6 months. Now it's up to $20. But, it's still reasonable at that price imo.

emr454
01-19-2010, 15:36
I loved it for the price. I got a btl at $16 some time ago...maybe 6 months. Now it's up to $20. But, it's still reasonable at that price imo.

I saw it recently at the local discount liquor store for around $17 IIRC.

I am interested in trying out some "sipping" tequilas and possibly trying a proper margarita (no, put the blender and ice away!).

Eric

Lost Pollito
01-19-2010, 16:34
Don't know that I'd call Lunazul a sipper, but it made a great Margarita. :grin:

emr454
01-19-2010, 17:13
Don't know that I'd call Lunazul a sipper, but it made a great Margarita. :grin:

It's gotta be better than the Cuervo gold my brother and I bought last year!:slappin:

Next to the Lanazul there was Herradura reposado, can't remember the price but I know it had to be less that $30.

Eric

Lost Pollito
01-19-2010, 20:24
No complaints against Herradura. Really nice. I'll say it again...Siete Leguas. It's really , really good. I don't claim to be a tequila nerd, but it makes me wanna turn into one. $40 for the blanco, and I'd call it a sipper. Herradura is right there as well. I think Luna is more of a mixer, while Herradura , and Siete are more sippin friendly, even as blanco. However, the Luna does beat Jose 100% of the time imo. :grin:

PAspirit1
01-21-2010, 18:07
I was really surprised to learn how brief the time in oak is for Tequila. I figured an anejo was at least eight years. Wikipedia says that a reposado is two months to one year. Over a year is an anejo.

Lost Pollito
01-21-2010, 21:39
Had a hoporita at New Holland last night. Not tequila, but it worked. A beer wash distilled twice and dry hopped. Finally a tequila-esque spirit for hop heads. :grin:

unclebunk
01-22-2010, 08:17
I was really surprised to learn how brief the time in oak is for Tequila. I figured an anejo was at least eight years. Wikipedia says that a reposado is two months to one year. Over a year is an anejo.

It is brief, isn't it? But a little time in the oak goes a long way with tequila. I've had some that was barreled for only two years and there was a pronounced oaky flavor, so the agave must be fairly delicate and subject to great change when in the barrel even for relatively short periods of time.

Vange
01-22-2010, 08:59
As with bourbon and other spirits the "experiments" of allowing more time to barrel age has been on a steady incline. Asom Broso even has an 11 year aged anejo. They recently added the extra anejo category due to all the anejos over 3 years. There are many anejos with 5 years of age. I think with time we may even see a 20 year anejo oneday!

ILLfarmboy
01-23-2010, 17:06
As with bourbon and other spirits the "experiments" of allowing more time to barrel age has been on a steady incline. Asom Broso even has an 11 year aged anejo. They recently added the extra anejo category due to all the anejos over 3 years. There are many anejos with 5 years of age. I think with time we may even see a 20 year anejo oneday!

I hope this also does not portend that high quality blanco and repasado tequilas will be one their way out. What I like about tequila is you can get an unaged or minimaly aged spirit that tastes good.

emr454
02-07-2010, 08:59
Just yesterday I picked up a bottle of El Jimador 100% agave and it is pretty awesome! It's very earthy, spicy and a tad fruity and the finish is rather long with fruity/earthy tones lingering for quite some time. I HAVE to see if I can get it cheaper somewhere other than where I bought it yesterday($47/750mL, ouch!)

BBQ+Bourbon
02-20-2010, 18:54
My favoriite tequila was 7 Leguas Anejo I picked up in a tourist trap in Cancun. It had the nicest pure agave flavor I've had though I am no expert. Unfortunately I can't find it in KC and my Mexican friends liked it so much, it didn't survive it's first outing.:lol:

Lost Pollito
02-20-2010, 20:21
My favoriite tequila was 7 Leguas Anejo I picked up in a tourist trap in Cancun. It had the nicest pure agave flavor I've had though I am no expert. Unfortunately I can't find it in KC and my Mexican friends liked it so much, it didn't survive it's first outing.:lol:
Siete Leguas was the original producer for Patron. I love siete. It is very pure with loads of fruit complemented by wonderful agave spice.

BBQ+Bourbon
03-03-2010, 20:05
My parents got one of those last-minute-travel-deals for a trip to Playa Del Carmen the other day and I had a few hours to decide whether I wanted to go. One of the factors that weighed in my decision was to buy a few bottles of 7 Leguas while there.

In the end I decided to save my vacation for some other things. Like a week in Kauai and a few days on the Big Piney river. :cool:

Josh
03-04-2010, 06:01
Had a hoporita at New Holland last night. Not tequila, but it worked. A beer wash distilled twice and dry hopped. Finally a tequila-esque spirit for hop heads. :grin:

Just noticed this. Sounds yummy! Do you know how widely distributed this is?

Lost Pollito
03-04-2010, 06:49
Just noticed this. Sounds yummy! Do you know how widely distributed this is?
Very limited....I think Michigan, and Illinois only at the moment. Maybe Indiana as well. It really is quite unique.:grin:

bigtoys
05-16-2010, 20:40
Maybe I've posted this before, but 1921 Reserva Especial (Reposado) is probably the best tequila, especially for the $55 cost. Note the dark red top; not the green of the regular reposado, which is ok, too, just not great.

Great for sipping or for a killer margarita ("martini" style). I started drinking it based on a recommendation by my barber, who's from Mexico. He told me to get it on a trip to Puerta Vallarta. It wasn't even imported then. A few years later, it was imported, then seemed to disappear. Now, it seems to be readily available again.
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Teq1921a.jpg
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Teq1921b.jpg

1921 was the year the Mexican Revolution ended
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Teq1921c.jpg

all the 100% de agave tequilas have a NOM number, which is a number given to the distillery by the government. different brands made by the same distillery will have the same NOM number
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Teq1921NOM.jpg

remember, dark red top, not green! not that I had any trouble going through the regular reposado in Margaritas!!!
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee132/bigtoys335/Teq1921both.jpg

DeanSheen
05-16-2010, 22:42
I'll have to grab that. It's summer now and I do prefer reposados.

Lost Pollito
05-16-2010, 22:55
The 1921 cream tequila is equally delicious.