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cowdery
11-11-2004, 18:59
At an event last night that I've written about elsewhere in another context, we tasted some Ardbeg Uigeadail. This is an unfiltered, 108.4 proof single malt named for Loch Uigeadail, the source of the distillery's water. (Ardbeg is on Islay.) This stuff is as flavorful and unsubtle as any bourbon. Very strong smoke scent, and smoke not char. When the presenter, Karen Fullerton, suggests adding water she describes what dilution does for the spirit as "like charming a snake out of its basket."

I had tasted this same spirit in the Spring at another event and it didn't make much of an impression on me. It sure did this time. All of the Ardbegs, including the Uigeadail, seem to have a cleaner finish than most single malts, which is something I like about them.

Bamber
11-12-2004, 03:26
I could not agree more. Ardbeg holds true to bourbon principles - no additives, high strength and pure, robust flavours. If EW SB is the Scotch drinkers Bourbon, then Ardbeg might be the Bourbon drinkers Scotch. Last night I actually had an Ardbeg 10 and an Uigeadail after a couple of my favourte Bourbons. They got on famously. It is no coincidence that JM mentions Ardbeg in the same breath as WT and Buffalo Trace. For me it is the ultimate Scottish distillery.

musher
11-12-2004, 07:35
Does the fact that Ardbeg is owned by a bourbon distiller have anything to do with it? Probably not, but it is an interesting bit of trivia.

wrbriggs
11-12-2004, 09:40
I can't get the Uigeadail where I am, but I can get the Ardbeg 10yr 92 proof bottling. I am not a huge scotch drinker, but I'm always open to trying new things... is this worth picking up?

chasking
11-12-2004, 12:21
Ardbeg 10-year-old is one of the great malts of the world, but I haven't seen it sold at 92 proof. Is it a distillery bottling, or is it from an independent bottler? If it's an independent there is a greater chance that it is from an "off" cask, although a reputable independent is probably a safe bet. I don't think you can go wrong with an Ardbeg put out by the distillery. Even if you don't like it, having a bottle of it will impress any malt snobs who may come to dinner.

cowdery
11-12-2004, 13:09
Ardbeg is still owned by Glenmorangie. Both brands are distributed by Brown-Forman in the U.S., but Brown-Forman doesn't own them...yet.

cowdery
11-12-2004, 13:13
I can confirm that the 10-year-old, 92 proof is a distillery bottling. We were supposed to taste it the other night but they substituted Uigeadail instead. I can't speak directly to the 10-year-old expression. I tasted it in the Spring but don't know where my notes are. However, I'm certainly warming to the distillery itself, so would be willing to try pretty much any of its products. For bourbon drinkers who find most malts too wimpy, Ardbeg could make you a believer.

greenbob
11-12-2004, 13:17
I am not a huge scotch drinker, but I'm always open to trying new things... is this worth picking up?



I would like to add a word of caution about Ardbeg 10. I admit that I like Talisker a whole lot better than Ardbeg 10, and I guess that puts me at odds with others here. But the fact remains that Ardbeg 10, with something like 55 ppm, has the greatest peat concentration of any single malt scotch. This is extreme stuff. Unfortunately the Ardbeg 17 is no longer available because of the cut back in single malt production in the mid-1980's.

If you are not a huge scotch drinker, I would recommend working up to Ardbeg 10. If, for example, one was not a bourbon drinker, I might recommend Bruichladdich which is an Islay with not that much peat. If you're used to heavy bourbons then why not start out with Talisker? I think you're taking a risk with Ardbeg 10.

That's just my opinion. Others obviously disagree.

musher
11-12-2004, 13:28
Ardbeg is still owned by Glenmorangie. Both brands are distributed by Brown-Forman in the U.S., but Brown-Forman doesn't own them...yet.


So sorry. I misunderstood the information on the b-f web site to mean that they owned it. They sure make it appear that way.

cowdery
11-12-2004, 13:50
If industry skuttlebutt is to be believed, they will own it when all is said and done. It is for sale and they are the most logical buyers.

TNbourbon
11-12-2004, 14:12
LVMH bought Glenmorangie last month -- for 300M Pounds. Diageo, by the way, has a 34% stake in LVMH.

tdelling
11-12-2004, 14:32
> I would like to add a word of caution about Ardbeg 10. I admit that I like
> Talisker a whole lot better than Ardbeg 10, and I guess that puts me at odds
> with others here. But the fact remains that Ardbeg 10, with something like 55
> ppm, has the greatest peat concentration of any single malt scotch.

If one is averse to peat, I find the Aberlour Abunadh to be a good stepping
stone from bourbon to scotch. It's big and deep and strong and manly without
having to resort to peat to achieve this.

I've had a few conversations along the lines of
me: "Do you like scotch?"
vicitm: "I don't like peat!"
me: "Might I interest you in a blind tasting of something interesting?"

Tim Dellinger

pepcycle
11-12-2004, 14:50
Definition of Incongruos:



a good stepping stone from bourbon to scotch.


http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

voigtman
11-12-2004, 15:27
Heard not nong ago that Glenmorangie PLC (owns Ardbeg, Glenmorangie, and Glen Moray), was bought by a French outfit famous for cognac, name escapes me. Strongly agree with comments about Ardbeg 10: wonderful single malt. The Ardbeg Uigeadail grows on you. Initially, I thought the peat levels were too low and sherry levels too high, but, like I said, it grows on you. Of all the Ardbegs I've tried, the Ardbeg 10 is best overall. Try the Ardbeg 10: it's only $36 in NH and well worth it! Cheers, Ed V.

cowdery
11-12-2004, 15:43
There you go. Presumably Brown-Forman's distribution agreement is unchanged, however. It could be B-F is planning or positioning itself for something involving Ardbeg distinct from Glenmorangie, as that seems to be what they are aggressively promoting.

cowdery
11-12-2004, 15:47
From CNN.com, 10/21/04

PARIS, France (AP) -- French luxury goods company LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis said Wednesday it plans to buy whisky maker Glenmorangie PLC for about 300 million (euro430.5 million, US$541 million).

Glenmorangie chief executive Paul Neep hailed the deal as "great news for the company, our brands and employees."

"As part of LVMH, we will continue to develop and grow our premium brands in their key markets," Britain's Press Association quoted him as saying.

Glenmorangie put itself up for sale in August. French company Pernod Ricard SA withdrew from the bidding earlier Wednesday, leaving LVMH as the preferred suitor. LVMH will launch its formal offer over the next 28 days, through its Moet Hennessy arm.

Glenmorangie, founded in 1893, is the world's sixth-largest Scotch-whisky producer by volume and makes single malts Glenmorangie, Glen Moray and Ardbeg.

For LVMH, the deal marks only its second venture outside wines and cognac. It bought control of the Belvedere premium vodka brand in 2001.

As well as premium champagne brands like Moet & Chandon, Dom Perignon and Krug, LVMH's 14-label drinks stable includes Hennessy cognac and new world wines like Cloudy Bay.

"Glenmorangie is a whisky of very great quality, a growing brand, led by a strong team. It will have its place alongside Moet & Chandon, Hennessy and our other prestigious brands," said Moet Hennessy chairman Christophe Navarre. "We have a fine future together."

The home of brands from Dior to Tag Heuer, LVMH is the world's biggest luxury goods maker by revenue. The Paris-based company's drinks division has traditionally been its second-biggest profit generator behind its star brand, the Louis Vuitton shoes, bags and leather goods maker.

A spokesman said LVMH hopes to have the acquisition completed by Christmas.

Bamber
11-13-2004, 03:01
If one is averse to peat, I find the Aberlour Abunadh to be a good stepping stone from bourbon to scotch. It's big and deep and strong and manly without having to resort to peat to achieve this.

Tim Dellinger



Absolutely - one of the biggest Scotches around, 120 proof, sweet, flavour packed and peatless.

DavidNelson
11-15-2004, 11:31
Keep your eyes peeled for the upcoming release of "Very Young Ardbeg" too. This was originally a Committee (Ardbeg fan club) release, but it went over well enough to become a general release. Cask strength, no filtering or coloring. Its spirit from after the restart in (IIRC) 1997 when, believe it or not, they raised the peating level even higher.

I was lucky enough to get my two bottles of the Committee release and it is an intense ride - I'll post a proper note one of these days, but the nose is an incredible essense of peat, complete with iodine and smoke and a Springbank-like salinity. Malt comes out on the palate, and its enough to balance the peat but barely. Lingers seemingly forever on the finish. Makes the 10 y.o. seems positively polished. Cracking good fun.

Cheers,

Dave

charred283
11-16-2004, 10:14
Keep your eyes peeled for the upcoming release of "Very Young Ardbeg" too.



I know this was released in the U.K., but has anyone heard anything about this being released in the U.S.?

Bamber
11-17-2004, 02:03
It's a limited release (and a really good whisky !), so I doubt you'll see it in the US. You could order it from thewhiskyexchange.com but its not *that* good. I believe Ardbeg plan to release a 7YO, 8YO and 9YO in subsequent years to track progress to their 10YO.

To be honest, if you can get the 10YO, go for that. It is the distillery managers favourite and many Scotch drinkers desert island whisky.

charred283
11-17-2004, 06:33
Thanks for your comments.



It's a limited release (and a really good whisky !), so I doubt you'll see it in the US.



That's the impression I'd gotten as well. Fortunately, there's plenty of the 10 year old and Uigeadail available locally. Personally, I think the 10 YO is better balanced and perfect for everyday drinking, but there's no denying the power and complexity in the Uigeadail. Both are great whiskies.

Cheers,
John

Vange
01-19-2006, 13:42
The A'Bunadh is one of my favorite scotches to date. Especially for sub $55! I have heard all good things about the Uigeadail. I have one question though. If you had to compare it to another scotch, would it be more like a macallan 18, lagavulin 16, or a'bunadh?

I am NOT a big fan of overly peaty single malts like the lagavulin, but I really love the a'bunadh and macs. Will I like the Uigeadail?

dougdog
01-19-2006, 14:17
If you had to compare it to another scotch, would it be more like a Macallan 18, Lagavulin 16, or A'bunadh?




You will probably find it more like the Lag...

Ardbeg is arguably the smokiest, peatyest 10yo out there...just ask Dane!

CrispyCritter
01-19-2006, 15:28
I'd also say it would be closest to the Lagavulin. It isn't as intensely peaty as Ardbeg 10, and some of the whisky in the vatting is older stock that was matured in sherry casks.

If you're a peat fan, it's wonderful. In Chi-town, it's about $2 more than Lagavulin 16, but unlike the Laga, it's cask-strength.

DrinkyBanjo
01-19-2006, 16:18
It is an Islay so Lagavulin would be the closest out of the ones you mentioned.

That said it is wicked, wicked stuff. If you like Islay malts and you like 'em cask strength this will be your new friend.

Paulbrad25
03-31-2006, 07:25
I can confirm that the 10-year-old, 92 proof is a distillery bottling. We were supposed to taste it the other night but they substituted Uigeadail instead. I can't speak directly to the 10-year-old expression. I tasted it in the Spring but don't know where my notes are. However, I'm certainly warming to the distillery itself, so would be willing to try pretty much any of its products. For bourbon drinkers who find most malts too wimpy, Ardbeg could make you a believer.


I've just got hold of one of the last bottles of 17yr old from the last barrel, sorry guys they're not shipping it to the U.S.A.

I stock the Uigeadail on my bar and recently collected a bottle of the 'very young' and 'Serendipity',
The Very Young is a 3 year old from a batch that is being released every few as a new expression. e.g. the next one will be called 'Not so Young' etc. and all of them at cask strength. eventually I'll be able to sample Ardbeg from differant bottles as an example of the aging process and what the barrel brings to the whisky.
The serendipity is an accidental vatting of Glen Moray (30%) and a very old Ardbeg (70%). It doesn't compare in power to the regular expressions but as a whisky in its own right its pretty special.

Both well worth looking out for on E-bay.

Just to make you guys really jealous, a friend of mine has just bought a bottle from the year he was born, from before the distillery originally closed down.

AVB
04-01-2006, 12:56
Ardbeg 17 is still to be found in the States if you look hard enough. The only problem is that the places who have it don't ship. Also, Ardbeg Very Young is 6 years old and the newer version is Ardbeg Still Young also 6 years old.

Paulbrad25
04-01-2006, 21:04
Sorry, my bad, more enthusiasm than research.:rolleyes:

But I'm looking for the 'Still Young' here in the U.K. and haven't managed to find any yet, not even on the Ardbeg website. My rep told me it was out in April, is this true or is it available elsewhere already.

AVB
04-02-2006, 06:33
Some samples of the "Still Young" are out but there hasn't been a release yet. I heard that it will be mid-April. I'm hoping it will be mid-April!


Sorry, my bad, more enthusiasm than research.:rolleyes:

But I'm looking for the 'Still Young' here in the U.K. and haven't managed to find any yet, not even on the Ardbeg website. My rep told me it was out in April, is this true or is it available elsewhere already.

tritioch
06-29-2006, 16:12
Uigeadail has the most checkered US release I have ever witnessed. Initially Brown-Forman imported it and planned a release, about two years ago, before scrapping plans and leaving us high and dry in NY. This summer Moet-Hennesy finally released Uigeadail into the US market on a "limited release" basis. Uigeadail should now be on the store shelves, even though we initially had to pre-order locally, there appears to be more stock than interest.

Strange thing though, Moet Hennessy suposedly imported and released it, but all the bottles I have seen say imported by Brown-Forman. Makes me think it has been sitting in a warehouse in the US for the last two year, for no damned reason.

*P.S. Word is that Ardbeg will have a new release in the US market sometime this fall, and it is not Ardbeg Very Young.

TimmyBoston
07-05-2006, 23:32
I've read the Uigaedail is a blend of 10-12 year old Ardbeg and a much, much older Ardbeg. Does anyone know how older the older whisky is?

CrispyCritter
07-07-2006, 19:45
From what I understand, the older component(s) of Uigeadail are 1970s-vintage. The older elements of the vatting are sherry-casked, as well.

It's expensive enough that I haven't had any in a while - but, IMO, it's a better deal than Lagavulin 16yo, as it's cask-strength. I need to bust my budget and pick up a couple of bottles!

Deep in my bunker, there's an unopened bottle of Ardbeg 1977, which is bourbon-casked. I've had a couple of bottles of this before it became extinct, and it's a truly outstanding Islay. I've heard that the 1974 was even better, but it was way, way, way out of my price range, even before it became unobtainium.

My intention is that the next time my brother-in-law (a native of Manchester, England who loves Ardbeg 10yo) comes down here to visit, the cork is going to be pulled from said bottle of Ardbeg '77.

The very oldest single malt I've had was Glenrothes 1974, a Speyside that had a strong citrus note to it. I really regret that I didn't pick up a spare bottle of it when I had the chance! I did share some of this with my brother-in-law, and it was well appreciated...

The oldest single-grain Scotch, and the oldest whisk(e)y I've ever had was a Hart Brothers bottling of Alloa 40yo. It had a soft, buttery note to it that I've never found in anything else - and it was a good way to learn that well-aged Scotch grain whisky can be quite a treat.

cowdery
07-20-2006, 18:22
I just saw Uigeadail at Binny's for $70 and 10-year for $50. Those were the only Ardbeg expressions they had.

Vange
07-21-2006, 12:08
The oldest single-grain Scotch, and the oldest whisk(e)y I've ever had was a Hart Brothers bottling of Alloa 40yo.

Just to add my 2 cents, the oldest single grain whisky (and oldest whisky in geenral) I have ever had is the new Scotts Selection North of Scotland bottling. It is 41 years old and to me is VERY reminiscent of bourbon! If you like bourbon, you'll love this single grain. Binnys has it,
Scott's Selection North of Scotland 1964-41yr Old.
I tried it at WhiskyLive in NYC and really liked it so I purchased it.

brockagh
07-25-2006, 08:12
I'm selling my Oogling. I bought it with the best intentions, but I'm selling it so I can buy a Kildalton. Anyway, if anyone's interested - http://cgi.ebay.ie/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ih=015&item=250011057482&rd=1&sspagename=STRK%3AMESE%3AIT&rd=1

TimmyBoston
08-02-2006, 23:11
I just bought a bottle of Uigeadail today. I am very impressed. I really, really like it. It is incredibly smooth and oh so smoky. I still have a question when it was said, "the older whisky is a 70's Vintage" Does that mean it was distilled in the 70's and just now bottled?
Thanks

CrispyCritter
08-04-2006, 22:01
Yes, and 1970s-era Ardbeg is phenomenal. Other than what gets vatted into Uigeadail, the only 1970s Ardbeg I've had is the 1977, and it's sublime. 1974 is considered to be the peak of the old pre-Glenmorangie-ownership production, but its price was so out of whack that I never have tasted it. Unfortunately, you're unlikely to find either on a store shelf anymore.

cowdery
08-08-2006, 18:13
I don't think I mentioned this in my original post, but when I tasted Uigeadail, we tasted four other Brown-Forman products on the same night. They were Appleton Rum, Jack Daniel's (Gentleman Jack), Woodford Reserve, and a South African cream liqueur.

I literally could still taste the Uigeadail two days later.

DrinkyBanjo
08-08-2006, 18:58
I hope you liked it!

cowdery
08-09-2006, 20:04
Yes, very much, even on the second day. I would buy it if my budget allowed and will drink it for free every time the opportunity is offered.

DrinkyBanjo
08-10-2006, 05:19
I have a bottle that I sample from every now and again and it is wicked stuff. If you have a chance try Lagavulin 12 YO Cask Strength. It is really wicked stuff!