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jeff
03-07-2005, 06:36
more than vodka, tequilla, rum, brandy or foreign whiskies? I am going to assume that since we are all here, bourbon is the drink of choice for most members. Is it the taste or the variety of brands available? Is it because bourbon is uniquely "american"? Do you come from a long line of bourbon drinkers? How did bourbon come to be your drink of choice and what is it that sets it apart from other libations, in your opinion?

Gillman
03-07-2005, 08:27
Good question. For me it is the taste of bourbon. This is so mainly with bourbon sampled neat although I like it sometimes on the rocks, but its true character comes through for me taken straight up, no ice. Recent bourbons that epitomise what I am looking for are Elmer T. Lee (with its new silky texture), Ancient Age Bottled In Bond (I don't know if this is still made but if any of you see it, buy it) and on the rye whiskey side, the current Wild Turkey Rye. These are perfect taken neat at their original proof. I like other bourbons too, notably Woodford Reserve and Jim Beam Black Label.

Second to bourbon for me is good malt (Scotch) whisky with some Irish whiskey as footnote no. 1 (notably Connemara Cask Strength). Third is Canadian whisky. Vodka and gin follow after that. Rum is good once in a while, but doesn't really rate in my book. But I must say too malt whiskey is so different to straight U.S. whiskey that I would really put it on a par with bourbon. I like smoky scotches that have a sherried background. Since there are not that many of these out there I tend to vat my own at home. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

I also still like beer a lot but it falls into a different category for me.

If I ever had the taste for brandy I have lost it, I find its perfumedness off-putting. I can take a dry-style cognac occasionally. If it is to be sweet and rich it has to be bourbon.

I have not acquired a taste for tequila except in a straight up margarita made with real citrus juice.

Gary

cowdery
03-07-2005, 08:52
For me it's the taste and the heritage. I think it has to be the taste, in every case, because I can't imagine drinking it for some other reason if the taste doesn't appeal to you. But it would be interesting to know the other factors too. My parents drank bourbon, but I did experiment with some other things before I came back to it. I did so when I was living in Kentucky and working in the industry, and became fascinated with the heritage of it. It was the American-ness that appealed to me in the sense that the heritage was accessible (I was living there) and "mine" (i.e., American).

mobourbon
03-07-2005, 08:52
I never liked wine or beer. I never really liked the alcohol taste. I did drink Canadians every now and then. About 2 years ago I tried Booker's. I loved the taste and I really enjoyed it. About 1 1/2 years ago I started trying different bourbons.
So, I like bourbon because of the taste. With all of the different brands, there are so many different tastes. Most are so enjoyable. A big part of it is the fact that it is the only true "American" whiskey. The history is fascinating!. Put that all together and that's why bourbon is, by far, my favorite libation. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/usflag.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/bowdown.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif

wrbriggs
03-07-2005, 09:23
As others have stated, it is first and foremost the taste of bourbon that does it for me. All other reasons for drinking it are secondary to the sensory enjoyment that this spirit offers. With that said, the heritage and history behind the drink are fascinating, and certainly add to my enjoyment.

Bourbon is not a common libation in my neck of the woods, which makes it even more attractive to me. Many of my snooty peers (including one holier-than-thou family member) will mock me for drinking a "redneck" drink, while they swill Crown Royal and single malt scotch. I've given up trying to convert most of them. I just sit back with a Riedel glass of something like Pappy 15 or 20, Weller Centennial, Evan Williams Single Barrel, Buffalo Trace or one of many others, and think to myself, with a little smile, "More for me."

Hedmans Brorsa
03-07-2005, 10:21
Bourbon is not a common libation in my neck of the woods, which makes it even more attractive to me. Many of my snooty peers (including one holier-than-thou family member) will mock me for drinking a "redneck" drink, while they swill Crown Royal and single malt scotch.



That is, more or less, how I got started on bourbon. Most people I knew worshipped at the altar of single malt Scotch and sneered at everything else.(And to be quite honest, so did I.)

I´ve always been an against-the-grain kind of person and noticing that there were a handful of expensive bourbons available, I simply decided to check them out. Booker´s were my first choice - clearly, this was an unwise way to start off. I was, to put it mildly, overwhelmed.

My second choice, though, was Woodford reserve, and it clicked immediately. I began to realize that there was a world out there to explore and that a lot of people were missing out on something good. Since then, I have, as they say, never looked back.

Oh, almost forgot the original question! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif I enjoy Scotch, Irish, rum, Cognac, rye etc but my desert island-choice for a drink would naturally be bourbon.

Gillman
03-07-2005, 10:49
It is amazing how deep-rooted the aversion can be, in its home country, to bourbon. I know a lady, originally from Texas, who almost literally shudders when I mention bourbon. She can't get past the image it has for her. She says it evokes images of moonshine and liquor made in a shack at the back of the property. I explain how it is made, how much of it stands with or exceeds the world's great spirits, but she won't even taste it. To a degree people anywhere tend to prefer something from far away as "better" even if it isn't, due to factors related to social distinctions, snobbery, etc. Perhaps too the unusual history of whiskey explains this attitude in the sense that it was banned from the market at times, not well-looked upon (sometimes for good reason) by the churches and other authorities, and otherwise not, shall we say, in the social register, but one would think those attitudes would have changed by now.

Gary

jeff
03-07-2005, 11:12
I think it has to be the taste, in every case, because I can't imagine drinking it for some other reason if the taste doesn't appeal to you.



I didn't mean to imply that someone might drink bourbon for other reasons even if they didn't like the taste, but rather: what is it about the taste itself that appeals to you more than other drink choices?

clayton
03-07-2005, 11:12
Count me in as one who is drawn to bourbon for its deep wellspring of interesting flavors. I'd sampled all kinds of beer, wine, and mixed drinks, always dabbling but never really finding much appeal in any of them. Drinking mostly to be social.

This changed when my girlfriend bought me a little beginner's book about whisk(e)y a couple years ago, mostly on a whim. I was fascinated by it, and started by buying a bottle of Irish whiskey (Powers), since it was inexpensive and easily available. I liked it more than I thought I would. A bottle of single malt Scotch (Aberlour 10) came next. My third bottle was bourbon (ORVW 10/90). I liked all three in different ways. Additional books and bottles soon found their way onto my shelves, and I gradually determined that bourbon appealed to me more than any of the other styles.

I still buy and enjoy Scotch, but bourbon has definitely captured the lion's share of my income and interest.

wrbriggs
03-07-2005, 11:16
I know a lady, originally from Texas, who almost literally shudders when I mention bourbon. She can't get past the image it has for her.


Gary,

I have successfully converted two friends to drinking bourbon, both of whom had that same reaction when I started mentioning that it had become my drink of choice. One of them is my own age, and he and I had foolishly consumed handles of Beam white together on occasion in college. I gave him a bottle of Blanton's for his 25th birthday, and it completely changed his view on bourbon.

My other friend is more than 20 years my senior, and had avoided bourbon for his entire life, shuddering at the thought of bourbon in a manner similar to that of the woman you mentioned. I gave him a bottle of Elijah Craig 12 yr (probably not the best choice, but I was fairly new to bourbon also). In a few short months, he went from mixing with coke, to drinking on-the-rocks, to drinking bourbon neat. He now will rarely drink anything else, and cannot believe that he had avoided it for so long.

I guess my point (if I have one) is that this attitude is widespread, and that while bourbon (like any other spirit) is not for everyone, it would probably appeal taste-wise to a much larger audience than currently consumes it, simply because of its reputation in certain circles as a low-quality moonshine-type product. I think that this is changing as people are drawn to the premium and super-premium bottlings, and that the distilleries are working very hard to reverse this image. I just hope the traditional bottlings don't get left in the dust with all the concentration on high-priced brands.

Gillman
03-07-2005, 12:37
Good tips, thanks. Clearly the people you gave the extra-fine bourbon too could see it was excellent, and they opened their mind. I will try that with my friend, recently we sampled Macallan but next day maybe Blanton will be the choice.

Gary

sharkman
03-07-2005, 14:11
Gary,

Just a personal note. If you like mexican food, then try a Tequila straight with food. Or, just sit down with some refried beans and tortilla chips and the Tequila explodes!
Cuervo Traditional (about $28) is the best for a beginner. NOT Cuervo Gold, that stuff is crap. If you want a great Tequila to go with food, then try El Tesoro Anejo. Great Tequila but pricey (about $55).

Good Tequila is a sipping drink, like a good whiskey. Does take a taste though and stay away from the cheap stuff... It will ruin your taste for any Tequila. Oh, and try to stay with Repesados and Anejos. They are older and more complex. Lots of pepper in most anejo tequilas.

Just thought I'd share if interested. If not, then enjoy a bourbon and accept my apologies.

Barry

P.s. Bourbon is still the undisputed champion of the World!
IMHO http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/bowdown.gif

sharkman
03-07-2005, 14:18
Ancient Age Bottled In Bond (I don't know if this is still made but if any of you see it, buy it)



I just bought a bottle of it at Liquor Barn In KY a few weeks ago. Good stuff. Never even knew it existed. Can;t get it in Ohio. I have the regular bottling, the 10 star, the 10 yo, and the BIB. Are there any others?

Barry

Gillman
03-07-2005, 14:26
I am always willing to learn, whether with bourbon or any drink including tequila and mescal of which I know very little. Thanks for the tips, I'll try some of your suggestions.

Gary

TNbourbon
03-07-2005, 15:46
I was first drawn to bourbon and whiskey, in general, as an academic exercise, having gone to work in a liquor store with only suitable knowledge on the wine side of it. But we sold a lot of whiskey, so I decided I wanted to be able to speak knowledgeably about it, too.
I started with Canadians (pleasant, but not always distinctive) and single-malts (like some, hate others, little love), but found something to like in almost every bourbon I tried. That similarity of appeal while also being identifiably different was what set the hook in me.
From there, I spent time gathering knowledge (including finding and joining this forum) and continue to date trying new, different and historic (when I can find them) bourbons, and trying to fine tune my impressions of them.

gr8erdane
03-07-2005, 20:24
What a simple question yet with such complex answers. Over the years, I have gone through many phases in drink. I started with cheap wines in my youth because it was easy to drink and tasted like soda pop. Then came beer because that is what everyone else drank. Then came vodka for no apparent reason other than availability as I never particularly cared for it. Whiskeys pretty much started in college in that it was impossible to hide a six pack under your blazer going to Faurot Field so whatever was on sale that Friday night (Seagrams 7, Jim Beam, Jack Daniels, or Canadian Club) at Eastgate Party Palace was in the flask. For the party after the game however, I was introduced to David Nicholson 1843 and that's where I really learned to love the drink. Then came the reality of dropping out of college and rum became my nightclub drink all the way up to when I tasted the Small Batch Collection in a small kitchen in a smaller town. That led to my first purchase of Bookers and it's gone on from there.

But why do I drink bourbon now? Because each bourbon I try never tastes the same to me every time I drink it. There is always a sense of adventure in each pour. Will this be the time I taste the wet hay Chuck described, or the rock candy Tim was able to discern, or maybe the mint so many people attribute to HH bourbon? Truth is, if I go looking for a particular taste I never seem to find it, but usually find a pleasant surprising other sensation I wasn't expecting. And with few exceptions, the tastes have always been pleasant and a calming influence on me. When I have bourbon in my glass all is right in my world.

TrueBarrel
03-08-2005, 13:16
I didn't mean to imply that someone might drink bourbon for other reasons even if they didn't like the taste, but rather: what is it about the taste itself that appeals to you more than other drink choices?



That up front boldness that even the most lightest-bodied Bourbons possess. For me, it evokes the sine qua nons of America itself: uniqueness and independence.

camduncan
03-08-2005, 15:13
I originally drank bourbon & coke in my late teens because that's what the group I socialised with drank. The initial appeal (after a very bad experience on Bundaberg rum & coke) was the sweetness.

Now I drink it because I like the different flavours, and, frankly, I've yet to find a drink I like more.
I 'trained' myself to drink it neat - it was a conscious decision not to add coke as a mixer as the straight taste wasn't initially to my liking. Then I found this site and a whole range of different bourbons. The variety that's opened up to me now means that I can almost always choose a bourbon to suit a given taste want...

ratcheer
03-08-2005, 19:09
Okay, Jeff, and I am answering before I read what everyone else replies.

I prefer bourbon both because it is a traditional American (and southern) product and because I think it tastes better than other spirits.

I also very much enjoy cognac, rum, and gin. Cognac can approach or sometimes match the bourbon level of quality flavor, but usually only at many times the price. My favorites are usually from Remy-Martin, but I also love the raisiny taste of Courvoisier. I have never really gotten in to expensive aged rums, so I can't comment on them. I basically like rum and gin as casual mixers.

I have had some wonderful scotches, but again at very high prices. And only one has ever been as delicious as even a good, but average priced bourbon. That was The Balvenie 15-year old single barrel.

I care nothing for vodka or tequila or any Canadian that I've ever actually tasted. Stolichnaya is fairly good, but who needs it? Run-of-the mill Irish has never interested me enough to try anything better.

I also love several fine liqueuers, such as the 150th anniversary Grand Marnier. But things like that are far too expensive to enjoy on a regular basis.

That's about all I can think of, right now.

Tim

ratcheer
03-08-2005, 19:19
I have not acquired a taste for tequila except in a straight up margarita made with real citrus juice.




What else would it be made with? http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/skep.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Tim

wrbriggs
03-08-2005, 19:25
I have not acquired a taste for tequila except in a straight up margarita made with real citrus juice.




What else would it be made with? http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/skep.gif http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Tim


One of those foul supermarket mixers? http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/puke.gif

Gillman
03-08-2005, 19:28
Tim, what were some of the bourbons you tried first?

What did you think of them?

Did you sample them neat, or did that come later?

Gary

sharkman
03-08-2005, 23:22
Past:

I got started on Jim Beam when I was about 17 from my best friends father (may he rest in peace.) He was a Jim and Coke drinker. That started me on the path of the whiskey.

Present:

It's the taste first, then the heritage. I love the history of the spirit (and other "american" whiskey. Just look at my avatar). But the taste is the first factor. If I like it (which I don't think there has ever been a bourbon that I hated... wait, take that back, Mark Twain...), then I follow-up on the history of the brand/distillery. I have over 250 opened bottles of spirits here at my home, with over 75 opened bottlings of bourbons, and I'm just getting started (about 1.5 years). I gotta say, I'm hooked... The stuff in the bottles that say "Kentucky Bourbon" on them, has a hold on my soul http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/bowdown.gif that won't let go. And my wife is a Rye fan... go figure? http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Future:

The World!!! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/70358-devil.gif Just kidding... http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smilielol.gif

Anyway, thanks for reading... I'm done.

Barry

TNbourbon
03-08-2005, 23:40
Tim, what were some of the bourbons you tried first?

What did you think of them?

Did you sample them neat, or did that come later?

Gary


Gary, I tried them neat almost from the beginning, quite simply not knowing any better. Generally, I would bring home a 200ml bottle or two from the store -- which would include Weller S.R., Heaven Hill BIB, Evan Williams Green and Black, the Beams (4,7, and 8), Maker's Mark, VOB 80- and 90-proof, Buffalo Trace (a bit later), Wild Turkey 80 and 101.
In general, there wasn't anything I just hated -- which was unlike both the Canadians and Scotches -- although I certainly liked some more than others. W.L. Weller Special Reserve 90-proof 7yo was an early favorite, and I still enjoy the Stitzel-Weller version I have open.
From there, I tried just about everything new I came across for a while.

Gillman
03-09-2005, 00:53
Did the ryed bourbons shock your palate initially after being accustomed to wine for so long? Some people who like beer see analogies to whiskey (the cereal-based taste) but I believe you do not sample beer, or very often.

I must say it took me time to "get" the taste of ryed bourbon and rye whiskey; I think I only started to like them when I realised how they were "supposed" to taste. Michael Jackson's 1987 World Guide To Whisky spoke of a "peppermint palate" and that is when I realised the flavor is intentional (not "bad") and meant to impart balance and complexity. (In general his writing on whiskey was an epiphany; I may bring his book to the Gazebo and would be pleased to read extracts if some persons would be interested). You mentioned liking Weller at the beginning, I too liked wheaters for a long time but now don't drink them except for (when I can get it) ORVW 15 year old bourbon.

Gary

cowdery
03-09-2005, 11:53
What is it about the taste itself that appeals to you more than other drink choices?



Good question. For me, bourbon has a lot of flavor and is complex enough to be interesting, to provoke some thinking, but it's always easy to drink. Except for some very young bourbons, it's always enjoyable and I think that is due to the sweetness that underlies everything. Liqueurs for the most part I find too sweet, rums too, and while I do enjoy other whiskies, some I find more interesting than enjoyable. The final kicker for me is bang for the buck. Bourbon is just such a good value. For example, I probably would drink cognac much more often than I do if the good ones weren't so expensive. Everything else that I like about as well as bourbon is a lot more expensive.

TNbourbon
03-09-2005, 12:37
Did the ryed bourbons shock your palate initially after being accustomed to wine for so long? Some people who like beer see analogies to whiskey (the cereal-based taste) but I believe you do not sample beer, or very often.



Well, you know, Gary -- though I've come to enjoy a good wine with a good meal, the ones for which I've most had an affinity from the beginning are dessert wines, such as Sauternes or Tokaji, the best of which balance the sweetness with some acidity, and have some body. Substitute 'rye' or 'spiciness' for 'acidity' -- sound familiar? So, while I already had some knowledge and appreciation of wine, the ones I liked best had some qualities which can be related to bourbon.

You're right, I've never been a beer drinker but, as noted above, I nonetheless found some analogies to wine. I'll also note that many of us also enjoy fine cognac (except for the price), yet another grape-based spirit.

And, no, I was never overwhelmed by the rye-ness of most bourbons, and I have no explanation of that. In fact, as I've stated here several times, I generally prefer straight rye to those bourbons which have heavier-than-normal rye contents -- e.g., Old Grand-Dad, Bulliet -- an oddity that also seems counterintuitive.

Hedmans Brorsa
03-09-2005, 13:14
I too liked wheaters for a long time but now don't drink them except for (when I can get it) ORVW 15 year old bourbon.



I wish more people had the opportunity to try Maker´s black seal. This is easily on a par with anything you´d care to mention from Buffalo Trace, Wild Turkey or Julian. Honest!

wrbriggs
03-09-2005, 13:36
Some people who like beer see analogies to whiskey (the cereal-based taste) but I believe you do not sample beer, or very often.


Count me in as someone who greatly enjoys beer, although Bourbon is still my poison of choice. I'll also drink wine, but almost exclusively with a meal. Bourbon is the only beverage that I'll pour just for the sake of having one.

BrbnBorderline
03-09-2005, 16:36
I like the flavor(s) in bourbon. And I like knowing NOTHING was added to it to make it taste "better". It is the REAL deal. And, it is a purely American product - those are darn hard to find these days. I'd rather put my $$ to work keeping Americans employed than Canuks or Limeys.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/toast.gif

joe1974
03-09-2005, 19:56
When I drink bourbon, I am staying in touch with my Kentucky roots, of which I am very proud. Heritage was the word Chuck Cowdery used and it sure fits. I drink fine wines, cheap domestic beer, and my spirit of choice is always bourbon. The taste is tantalizing and I also think there is some sense of, dare I say, rugged manliness that is embodied by the drink. I think of outlaws playing poker with pistols slung on both hips knocking back snorts of bourbon whiskey (except the bottle says XXX on it). Kenny Rogers often mentions our beloved spirit in his songs. Of course so does George Thoroughgood, Willie Nelson, and countless others. Bourbon is where I'm from, and who I am.

sydney
03-11-2005, 16:34
I had no idea that bourbon was considered by some people to be a "low quality, moonshine type product." Seriously. I had no such idea. Today, I read about this view in this forum. I don't like that idea at all.

Gillman
03-11-2005, 18:11
I agree with you Syd but the impression you mentioned remains widespread (in my experience). It is one of many popular misconceptions, but hopefully is on its way out.

Gary

TNbourbon
03-11-2005, 18:47
I had no idea that bourbon was considered by some people to be a "low quality, moonshine type product." Seriously. I had no such idea. Today, I read about this view in this forum. I don't like that idea at all.



Whiskey/bourbon -- both in early forms and modern -- has been a stalwart of American enterprise and governance. Among other things, it made corn a profitable cash crop on the frontier as much by its portability as potability -- which, in turn, helped finance the frontier's westward drive -- and provided a very large part of the federal government's funding during much of the pre-Prohibition era (excise taxes, most generally on alcohol and tobacco, amounted to well over half of federal revenues in those days). Even today, as one can tell by the ruckus in KY over a liquor sales tax, it is important to both government and industry.
So, whiskey/bourbon is among the handful of things without which it can be argued America wouldn't be America. But precious few know this history, and so it's reputation has been shaped by the temperance leagues and Prohibitionists.
Without belittling the tragedy which is alcohol abuse, I'd posit that whiskey's uses have been far more beneficial to the country than its abuses costly.

nardo
03-11-2005, 21:58
For me it's simple, Bourbons taste good. there are many various flavors witin the drink. and on the occaision that I can sit down, relax, and somtimes have a fine cigar, bourbon is the drink of choice.
I think I'll go pour a Wild Turkey Rare Breed now. CHEERS!

Hedmans Brorsa
03-12-2005, 04:31
I had no idea that bourbon was considered by some people to be a "low quality, moonshine type product."



This has, for long, been a widespread notion in Sweden. I´m beginning to sense a modest wind of change,though.

The blame, I think, lies at least partly with the bourbon industry itself and the way they chose to promote themselves earlier on.

cowdery
03-12-2005, 12:48
When I think about how misunderstood bourbon is, part of me thinks, "Good, more for me." But the other part realizes that it has been the improved reputation of bourbon, especially in Japan and other foreign markets, that has made so many of today's best products available for the rest of us.

Bamber
03-15-2005, 02:30
Obviously the smell / taste / colour is the main factor. Bourbon is like a single idea expressed perfectly.

I like the history of Bourbon and how it ties in with American history and the frontier spirit. Bourbon has soul.

I like surpirising Scotch drinkers, with American whisky other than JD or JB white. You always know when you've got an immediate convert http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

And finally I like to drink Bourbon because I feel I am rebelling against the half-witted middle class 'cognoscenti', that are over represented in the UK by our left wing media, who think it's clever to rubbish America and everything American.

Gillman
03-15-2005, 03:33
Well put, Bamber, I liked your post.

Gary

Bamber
03-15-2005, 04:20
Thanks Gary, I appreciate that http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

TNbourbon
03-15-2005, 15:28
...Bourbon is like a single idea expressed perfectly...



Very nicely stated. I'm an avid reader, and among my varied literary interests, I enjoy crime novels, within genre there are a number of long-time serial authors (Robert B. Parker, John Sandford, Michael Connelly, James Patterson) who feature and/or reintroduce many of the same characters in story after story. That's bourbon, to me -- though the plot lines differ from bottle to bottle and keep the series new and interesting, my steady relationship with the main characters (corn, wheat, rye, wood) allows each story to intertwine with the others and form a comfortable familiarity.
I know what's in the bottle each time I open a new bourbon -- but I'm excited to find out where the plot line leads me.

Bamber
03-16-2005, 02:19
Tim,

Thanks and I know exactly what you mean. I had a glass of ER 17YO and some Blanton's Silver last night. Both such great whiskies that show their constituent components in their own unique way.

idpa2000
03-17-2005, 08:29
For me it is taste and tradition. I was first introduced to bourbon - Old Grand Dad nearly 30 years ago by Scotish gentelman who I often played golf with. He is long gone but his love of good American spirits lives on. I had asked him why boubon and not scotch from his native country. He was amazed that we Americans did not realize what a good thing we had right under our noses. For him it was the taste of bourbon. Once every two years or so when we play a course near where he lived I make it a point to stop by his grave an give thanks over tumbler of OGD BIB. Some things are hard to explain. Some things need no explaination.

Gillman
03-17-2005, 11:55
Well, there is a link back to Scotland with bourbon and this nice story reflects that. I think Scots who like whisky can recognise something of their national spirit in bourbon, bourbon in other words carries a distant echo of its origins. Dr. James Crow was a Scots immigrant to America. The surname Craig is a Scots name. George Washington employed a distiller not long in America from the auld sod. The early 1800's whiskey writer Samuel M'Harry (surely) was of Scots or Scots-Irish descent. The drink they made in the U.S.A. was different from scotch whisky but still had certain ties to it: both had a smoky taste, both were made from cereal grain, both were (mostly) not flavored with additives and both were genuine, aged whiskey not a bland neutral alcohol. It is like when the British first heard rock and roll in the 1950's and took to it like nobody's business. Why? Because it was in some sense their own, they saw their distant cousins in America playing a music they could still relate to, since common ancestors originated a good chunk of it. Names like Cochran, Presley, Haley, Lewis, Holly, Cash, Perkins, and I can go on and on were British names, not Polish or Jewish or Syrian names (people from these backgrounds contributed to rock music but that was after). There is a direct cultural connection there, and same thing with whiskey. I know rye whiskey has other, or additional, associations (German-American, mainly) but I am thinking primarily of bourbon. Of course this is not a scientific conclusion, but I think it is based on more than impression, too. Thus, the original Messrs. Beam and Dickel may have been German immigrants but I am describing what I believe is (or rather was) a general tendency.

Gary

Edward_call_me_Ed
03-20-2005, 05:54
Hi Bamber,
I appreciate what you had to say, too.
Mostly I love bourbon for the way it tastes. And for how it makes me feel. I don't mean drunk, though it can and does have that effect on me! http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif No, somehow, when I take a sip of good bourbon, a smile comes to my lips and I feel happy.
I also love the history (or maybe lore is the word I am looking for) of bourbon and want to know more about it. I enjoy other spirits as well, notably malt whisky from Scotland, Ireland and Japan and the malt based blends from those countries, too. I have one bottle of tequila open and am enjoying that. I will be getting a few more of those in the future. I don't drink wine much at all. Dessert wines are okay, I like a port once in a while. The wines that are highly thought of burn my throat and give my instant heartburn. No, Thanks! I like good beer and Japanese beer is pretty good beer. Beer is dangerous stuff though, I tend to inhale it at high speed. I would rather sip good bourbon.
Ed

Bamber
03-21-2005, 01:58
Hi Ed,

I'm always trying to enjoy wine but I still can't really get my head around it, especially white wine, which seems to give me an instant headache.

Bourbon's the drink for all occasions http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

lakegz
03-25-2005, 21:19
I like bourbon because....
1)appealing color
2)such a sweet aroma
3) rich, dense, and multilayered flavors
4) The heritage
5) i like knowing that im a rare species in san diego.

mbanu
07-04-2005, 02:48
The age and the price. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Bourbon makers are the only spirit producers I can think of that still seem to believe that quality spirits aren't just something the rich should be able to afford. I appreciate that a lot.

Bourbon makers also put out a lot of OLD spirit. I hear people sort of off-handedly mentioning 10 year and 15 year old spirits as a given, but to me, well, 15 years is a long time. Trying to think of all the stuff that's gone on in the past 15 years in a single instance is almost a bit overwhelming. And summing it all up in a couple of ounces of muddy brown liquid? Amazing!

Drinking something 10-15 years old to me is a reflective practice. It helps me remember what I've been up to these past 10 to 15 years. Helps me keep in touch with my past so I can face my future with a clearer head. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

kbuzbee
08-01-2005, 10:47
Good question. For me it is the taste of bourbon. This is so mainly with bourbon sampled neat ... Second to bourbon for me is good malt (Scotch) whisky



I agree with most (all?) posters here, the taste is the thing. For me, I like a bold flavor in just about everthing I consume.

In Bourbon, that is the sweet, carmel, vanilla taste of something huge like Booker's (strickly neat). I can't say it would have appealed when I was younger but I'm old now so.... I was born in Kentucky and Bourbon was the only drink I can remember my parents drinking (though always in a mix) so I would say I come by my enjoyment honestly. On a warm afternoon Kentucky tea (mostly icewater with a splash of Bourbon) can be very refeshing.

Likewise I now enjoy Scotch (typical pour will be one or the other). We took a recent trip to the UK. I figured I should try to figure out something about Scotch before going so I would have some idea what I was looking at. Trying 6-8 different offerings I came to my conclusions pretty quickly, the peat monsters, Lagavulin and Laphroaig. Now those are some fine Scotches (and I don't think many people who enjoy them would be included in the 'Scotch Snobs' catagory). I'd read over and over warnings not to start with these two.... Oh well. ;-). For those who haven't tried them, Lagavulin is smoother and more refined, Laphroaig roars the loudest. Both are delicious.



I have not acquired a taste for tequila except in a straight up margarita made with real citrus juice.



I was never much of a Tequila drinker either until I tried Espolon Anejo. This has some pretty good flavor to it, for Tequila. As for Margaritas, Margarittaville has posted their recipe for their Ultimate Margarita. This thing is delicious and deadly! A copy is here:

http://www.ocean.washington.edu/people/staff/ericl/marg.html

Cheers,

Ken http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif

Chaz7
08-01-2005, 14:05
I suppose bourbon just sort of snuck up on me. I was/am really into microbrews, and I've enjoyed single malt scotch for many years. When the small batch collection first came out (5 or 10 years or so ago)with Booker, Basil, Baker and the rest, I started enjoying Basil Haydens.But, brews first, wine second, scotch third, martinis next, and as an afterthought, bourbon.Then I wanted to try some classic cocktails, so I picked up a bottle of Knob Creek for some Manhattans. It was fine for a "fling". I have been reading Malt Advocate for years (when I can find it)for their scotch reviews, when I started reading about bourbon. So about six month's or so ago, I bought a bottle of Evan Williams Single Barrel 95. I was hooked. I loved the flavor, mouthfeel, nose, everything about it. And it was $20.00. Springbank Scotch on sale is $40.00, but I liked this better, or at least differently. Then, I found the Pappys;my first bottle was the 15 yr old. Then the Lot B 12, then the holy grail, at least for me, the 20. Now, because of this site, I've tried so many different bottles; Old Grand Dad 114, Black Maple Hill, Old Forester 100, Jeffererson Reserve, 1792 Richmount, Old Rip Van Winkle 10 yr, and others.I even tried Wild Turkey, the first since my youthful party days (back then we mixed it with Coke, didn't know better); although it was the more refined Russell's Reserve and then Rare Breed. Scotch never took me by storm this way. Sure, I'm proud it's American, but it's the flavour and the price (buying all this bourbon would have easily cost me 5-6 times more had it have been scotch). Now, I am looking forward to driving from Colorado to the Bourbon Festival in September, to tour, to meet fellow enthusiasts, and to try (if there is anything left by then!)some new bottlings.

ripvanfan
08-19-2005, 20:50
I'm rather tardy in posting to this thread, but thought I would add my story nonetheless. The first bottle of bourbon I purchased or even tried was Evan Williams shortly after my 21st birthday. I wasn't terribly fond of it calling it a Jack Daniels look-a-like. The bottle stayed around for a few years until I finally finished it while fending off a nasty cold. A strayed away from bourbon for several years after my bottle of EW mostly drinking Canadian 12 year for whiskey and began enjoying the art of crafting home brew. 8 or 9 years ago I decided to give bourbon another try. A bottle of Blanton's had caught my eye for awhile at my local liquor store and I finally decided to give it a chance when they put the bottle on sale. I was very impressed with it and soon added a bottle of Hancock's Reserve. 2 years later I discovered Old Rip Van Winkle. The labling caught my eye and soon the bourbon was my overwhelming favorite. I have went on to try many bourbons over the last 5 years, but still have many dozen more to try.

I'm a real odd duck when it comes to liquor in general. I can't handle wine, have never tried Budweiser(some kids actually do listen to their father), and have never tried or wanted to try tequila. Usually keep a bottle of Grey Goose on hand. Havana Club 7 year is the only rum I keep around. No Gin for me... I do dabble in a little single malt. I sure do miss paying 40 dollars for a bottle of Macallan 18. Oh well, I prefer bourbon over scotch by a large margin anywho.

CrispyCritter
08-21-2005, 22:45
Another late poster...

I started out with single malts, and I still like them a lot. However, they tend to be a bit hard on the wallet, between the weak dollar and the cost of shipping stuff overseas. I used to think along the lines of "all bourbons are alike," but I've found that's definitely not the case. There's easily as much variety in bourbon as there is from anything overseas.

Aside from being generally a better value (in my reckoning, a given tier of bourbon generally costs about half of what an equivalent-tier Scotch costs), I'm finding that bourbon is more appealing in hot summer weather than a peaty Islay Scotch... though I do like an occasional peat fix, even in summer. Speyside Scotches are also good summer pours, but I can get two bottles of Old Fitz BIB for the price of one bottle of Aberlour 10...