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View Full Version : Potrero Rye??



kbuzbee
07-25-2005, 16:11
What do you folks think of the two Anchor Steam Ryes??? I was intrigued reading about them but one is one year old in lightly toasted oak, the other is aged 3 years in charred barrels. I really like the deep wood flavors of spirits like Jefferson's Reserve and my initial reaction to the two Potrero's is 'Why did you rush them out of the barrel?' but this seems to be an intentional act..... Any thoughts???

Cheers,

Ken

TNbourbon
07-25-2005, 18:01
What do you folks think of the two Anchor Steam Ryes?..



Young. Expensive. (That's a combo reminscent of Jack Daniel's.) Never had it (see previous).

robbyvirus
07-25-2005, 22:30
I tried them at the Whiskey Expo last year and found them quite harsh and unpleasant. To my taste they need a few more years in the wood...especially for the selling price.

kbuzbee
07-26-2005, 07:36
That was kinda what I'd expected...... Oh well, that's why it's good to have folks to ask such things of ;-)

chasking
07-26-2005, 14:23
I like it. Old Potrero is made from a mashbill of 100% malted rye, and it is the only whiskey (that you can buy) like that. It is really in its own category among whiskies; it is not really comparable to traditional straight rye or malt whiskey made from malted barley. It might well benefit from more time in the barrel, but I find it surprisingly good for its youth, which is a testiment to the strength of the style. Don't forget, it's bottled at about 120 proof, so if it's a little harsh, some water or ice won't hurt it. (I think I read somewhere that they are bottling a lower-proof version now, but I don't know that for sure.)

Perhaps they bottle it young because they can. Why keep in in a warehouse for six or eight or whatever years, if people will pay a good price for it at one to three years? I would be curious to know how their sales are, and whether people would pay more for an older version.

kbuzbee
07-27-2005, 10:38
Agreed, I also wonder how widely distributed it is.

We get very few things in Ohio (heck, Kentucky is just over the river and we get fewer than half of their offerings!). We don't have either rye or their gin.

Thanks for the impressions though. I, too, had the thought 'because they can'. I'd love to see what 6-8 years would do for it.

Cheers,

Ken

tlsmothers
07-27-2005, 22:10
I really like them both, but agree that they are pricy for young whiskey. My understanding is that rye is more expensive to produce than corn so maybe that causes a bit of a higher price since these are the only 100% ryes. I actually love a Manhattan with the 18th century (2oz), Vya Sweet Vermouth (1/2 oz), and the extinct King Eider Dry Vermouth (1/2 oz), stirred 100 times.

John_Regehr
08-23-2005, 22:54
I first tried Old Potrero a few years ago in a bar in Washington DC. It was totally different from any whisky I'd ever tried. In fact, I remember bemusedly wondering if some unscrupulous bartender, distraught at the idea of running out of "the good stuff," had cut his remaining stock of OP with cinnamon schnapps.

Anyway, tonight, inspired by another thread at straightbourbon that said "an unopened bottle isn't doing anyone any good" or something to that effect, I opened a bottle of Old Potrero that I snagged from Sam's while visiting Chicago a few months ago.

I am no sophisticated taster, but while sipping the Old Potrero I'm reminded much more strongly of a decent grappa than I am of a whisky. I still get a ton of cinnamon, and maybe other sweet spices. I'm also reminded of a Chinese spirit that I've tried a few times--and disliked--that is made primarily from sorghum, I'm told. This isn't a fault with the Potrero, but an undertone that is difficult to overlook.

Overall I'd say it's worth the $60 price tag mostly because it's interesting, enjoyable, and different. Objectively it probably doesn't beat a good scotch or grappa at similar price, or a good bourbon at half the price.

tlsmothers
08-24-2005, 19:21
Which one did you have? The 18th century or the the straight rye?

John_Regehr
08-24-2005, 22:03
It's the 18th century. Essay 10-RW-ARM-3-A, whatever that indicates.

Tried a bit more tonight, this time watered down to around 90 proof. This makes the grappa taste a little less evident, leaving lots of cinnamon schnapps. Very sweet.

tlsmothers
08-25-2005, 19:34
I find it very grassy with a lot of that spiciness that you speak of. It definitely needs some water. It does make a mighty fine Perfect Manhattan, stirred a hundred times, to help dilute.

John_Regehr
08-27-2005, 19:15
How different is the straight rye? Is it worth trying as well?

kbuzbee
08-28-2005, 07:09
How different is the straight rye? Is it worth trying as well?



Hi John, I tried the Straight Rye (also known as the 19th century expression) about a month ago. It is really interesting. It has huge flavor. I disagree with some here, I don't think the lack of time a wood hurts it at all (though 1. I'd fully expected it to and 2. I would love to try it at 8-10 years). The flavor is just massive but not overly complex. I got a lot of rye bread flavor out of it. Good mouth feel and long finish (as in still had tasting memory of it the following day - long) I've tried quite a few Bourbons, a few Ryes and Scotchs. Never tried anything similar to this. It is very good but try not to have preconceived expectations. I think you'll enjoy it but I doubt it will be on your list of top tens.

Cheers,

Ken

DrinkyBanjo
08-31-2005, 12:18
I really agree with this statement. I was infatuated with this when I first tried it because it was so unique. I let it sit for a while, tried it again and where I still liked it I wasn't so enamored as I was the first time but I still liked it quite a bit.

Very unique interesting stuff. I want to try the barrel proof real bad.

Tim

Bamber
09-01-2005, 00:49
Tried the 45 % version for the first time yesterday ....

I thought it tasted like a cross between some weird brandy / grappa and a cheap rum. I felt I could still detect smell a hint of 'white dog' on the nose and I found the mouthfeel to be oily in a way I did not like ! Sure the stuff has a lot of flavours - just not very nice ones (IMO)

All in all, I don't like it and I think it is a rip off http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

kbuzbee
09-01-2005, 06:17
Tried the 45 % version for the first time yesterday ....

I thought it tasted like a cross between some weird brandy / grappa and a cheap rum. I felt I could still detect smell a hint of 'white dog' on the nose and I found the mouthfeel to be oily in a way I did not like ! Sure the stuff has a lot of flavours - just not very nice ones (IMO)

All in all, I don't like it and I think it is a rip off http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif



I can see having that impression. I took a different route.

It's kinda like living your whole life with apples, bananas and pears. Then in your 40s you have your first grapefruit. It's so different from anything you call fruit you probably won't like it.

If you can get beyond the 'I want it to taste like a banana, an apple or a pear' reflex (which is very difficult!) you might enjoy the new fruit. I doubt it would ever become your favorite fruit, but it is something to have when you want to reach outside your usual choices.

Not to say there is anything wrong sticking to the original three either... Just a different play. I had to work with the Old Potrero a few days to decide exactly what I felt about it. I finally wound up baking a loaf of 100% rye bread and had a slice (toasted) with the Old Potrero. That was an Ah Ha! moment. I really didn't well understand what I was tasting until that. Once I had a baseline I could start working with the whiskey.

You are right, it is very viscous (oily). I like a big mouth feel. This one 'may' be more than I like but it was fun to try. Same with the nose. Same with the taste. As I said before, I think it's a very high quality spirit and one I am very glad to have. It will not become one of my favorites, it's too far outside my 'zone', but I think it's quite good.

Weird analogy!

Cheers,

Ken

Bamber
09-01-2005, 06:31
Ken,
I hope I do warm to it. I guess after taking to American, Scotch and Irish so easily I thought this would be another great discovery. Alas no - but time will tell.

What you say about understanding it is very true. I found myself unable to describe the flavour components as I had no point of reference.

kbuzbee
09-01-2005, 06:42
Ken,
I hope I do warm to it. I guess after taking to American, Scotch and Irish so easily I thought this would be another great discovery. Alas no - but time will tell.

What you say about understanding it is very true. I found myself unable to describe the flavour components as I had no point of reference.



Exactly what I found! Try that idea of baking a loaf of rye bread. You don't even have to eat it, just mix yeast, water, rye flour, salt and a few caraway seeds, let it sit an hour or two, pop it in the oven for an hour at 350. When the scent is EVERYWHERE, have a pour...... http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif

Enjoy!!

Ken

Bamber
09-01-2005, 07:16
Heh heh that sounds serious. I am going to have to try that http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

My girlfriend will think I've finally lost the plot http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

kbuzbee
09-01-2005, 10:15
Always good to keem 'em guessing http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/icon_pidu.gif

Ken